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How can I tell gnu make not to build some recipe in parallel. Let's say I have the following makefile :

sources = a.xxx b.xxx c.xxx
target  = program

all : $(target)

$(target) : $(patsubst %.xxx,%.o,$(sources))
    $(CXX) -o $@ $<

%.o : %.cpp
    $(CXX) -c -o $@ $<

%.cpp : %.xxx
    my-pre-processor -o $@ $<

However, the my-pre-processor command create temporary files with fixed name (I cannot change this). This is working fine if I just use make without the -j parameter. However, if the -j option is used, the build sometimes fails because two concurrent invocation of my-pre-processor overwrite their temporary files.

I'd like to know if there is a way to tell make that it must not build the try to parallelize the execution of the %.cpp : %.xxx recipes.

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2  
... Why wouldn't you fix the tool instead? – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Dec 3 '10 at 14:20
1  
Well, I don't have the source, so it's not really an option, sadly. – Sylvain Defresne Dec 3 '10 at 14:53
    
Get a better tool, then. Any preprocessor that is not able to run concurrently is basically broken. – Jonathan Leffler Dec 4 '10 at 20:41
up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is a horrible kludge, but it will do the job:

b.cpp: a.cpp

c.cpp: b.cpp

Or if there are actually a lot of these, you can have a few stiff drinks and do this:

c-sources = $(sources:.xxx=.cpp)

ALLBUTFIRST = $(filter-out $(firstword $(c-sources)), $(c-sources))
ALLBUTLAST = $(filter-out $(lastword $(c-sources)), $(c-sources))
PAIRS = $(join $(ALLBUTLAST),$(addprefix :,$(ALLBUTFIRST)))

$(foreach pair,$(PAIRS),$(eval $(pair)))

(This works in GNUMake, I don't know about other versions.)

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Solution 1

GNU Make contains the special built-in pseudo-target .NOTPARALLEL

Example:

.PHONY: all clean

.NOTPARALLEL:

anotherTarget: dependency1

Solution 2

You can also use the -j <n>,--jobs[=<n>] flag on the command line where n is the number of recipies allowed to run in parallel.

Usage: make -j <n> | make --jobs=<n>

Example: make -j 1 | make --jobs=1

note: omitting <n> will allow an arbitrary number of recipes to be executed, only limited by your system's available resources


Solution 3

Finally, you can assign the command line flag in solution 2 to the MAKEFLAGS variable from within your Makefile

Example: MAKEFLAGS := -j 1 or MAKEFLAGS := --jobs=1

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If the temporary files are created in the current working directory, you may be able to use subdirectories (not pretty, but rare):

sources = a.xxx b.xxx c.xxx
target  = program

all : $(target)

$(target) : $(patsubst %.xxx,%.o,$(sources))
    $(CXX) -o $@ $<

%.o : %.cpp
    $(CXX) -c -o $@ $<

%.cpp : %.xxx
    mkdir $@.d
    s=`realpath $<` && cd $@.d && my-pre-processor -o ../$@ "$${s}" || { $(RM) -r $@.d && false; }
    $(RM) -r $@.d

Also, since you are using syntax but not features that are exclusively available to GNU make, please note that the following equivalent Makefile should be more portable

sources = a.xxx b.xxx c.xxx
target  = program

all : $(target)

$(target) : $(sources:.xxx=.o)
    $(CXX) -o $@ $<

.cpp.o:
    $(CXX) -c -o $@ $<

.xxx.cpp:
    mkdir $@.d
    s=`realpath $<` && cd $@.d && my-pre-processor -o ../$@ "$${s}" || { $(RM) -r $@.d && false; }
    $(RM) -r $@.d

.PHONY: all
.SUFFIXES: .xxx .cpp .o

Also note that GNU make's intrinsic .cpp.o: rule allows for users to specify flags on the command line, (similar to)

.cpp.o:
    $(CXX) $(CPPFLAGS) $(CXXFLAGS) -c -o $@ $<

which your users may like when they need to provide, say, custom include directories via -L...

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3  
Consider making a wrapper script for the preprocessor that does all of the work in a temporary directory. This would keep the Makefile tidier. – Jack Kelly Dec 4 '10 at 20:28

A related solution is to specify the exact order you want things built (rather than saying, "don't build in parallel").

To specify the exact order, you can use order-only prerequisites. Here's GNU make's man page on it:

Occasionally, however, you have a situation where you want to impose a specific ordering on the rules to be invoked without forcing the target to be updated if one of those rules is executed. In that case, you want to define order-only prerequisites. Order-only prerequisites can be specified by placing a pipe symbol (|) in the prerequisites list: any prerequisites to the left of the pipe symbol are normal; any prerequisites to the right are order-only:

targets : normal-prerequisites | order-only-prerequisites

And here's the example they offer:

OBJDIR := objdir
OBJS := $(addprefix $(OBJDIR)/,foo.o bar.o baz.o)

$(OBJDIR)/%.o : %.c
        $(COMPILE.c) $(OUTPUT_OPTION) $<

all: $(OBJS)

$(OBJS): | $(OBJDIR)

$(OBJDIR):
        mkdir $(OBJDIR)

I had to use order only prerequisites on a make dist rule due to a race condition. The dist recipe depended on a distclean and diff rules, and the diff rule performed an svn diff -r XXX to show the exact changes. On occasion, make would delete the diff it just created because the clean rule would run after the diff rule.

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Five-year-old question and the right answer appears the same day I need it. Thanks! – svick Sep 9 '15 at 17:43

You would do well to study the operation of the ylwrap tool that comes with automake: It solves most of the same problems for old versions of lex and yacc:

http://git.savannah.gnu.org/cgit/automake.git/tree/lib/ylwrap

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