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I often need to match a tuple of values that should have the same constructor. The catchall _,_ always winds-up at the end. This of course is fragile, any additional constructor added to the type will compile perfectly fine. My current thoughts are to have matches that connect the first but not second argument. But, is there any other options?

For example,

type data = | States of int array 
            | Chars  of (char list) array

let median a b = match a,b with
    | States xs, States ys ->
        assert( (Array.length xs) = (Array.length ys) );
        States (Array.init (Array.length xs) (fun i -> xs.(i) lor ys.(i)))
    | Chars xs, Chars ys -> 
        assert( (Array.length xs) = (Array.length ys) );
        let union c1 c2 = (List.filter (fun x -> not (List.mem x c2)) c1) @ c2 in
        Chars (Array.init (Array.length xs) (fun i -> union xs.(i) ys.(i)))
    (* inconsistent pairs of matching *)
    | Chars  _, _
    | States _, _ -> assert false
share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can use the slightly shorter pattern below:

| (Chars _| States _), _ -> assert false

In fact, you can let the compiler generate it for you, because it's still a little tedious. Type the following and compile:

let median a b = match a,b with
| States xs, States ys ->
    assert( (Array.length xs) = (Array.length ys) );
    States (Array.init (Array.length xs) (fun i -> xs.(i) lor ys.(i)))
| Chars xs, Chars ys -> 
    assert( (Array.length xs) = (Array.length ys) );
    let union c1 c2 = (List.filter (fun x -> not (List.mem x c2)) c1) @ c2 in
    Chars (Array.init (Array.length xs) (fun i -> union xs.(i) ys.(i)))

Warning 8: this pattern-matching is not exhaustive. Here is an example of a value that is not matched: (Chars _, States _)

You can now copy-paste the suggested pattern back into your code. This is usually how I generate non-fragile catch-all patterns for types with tens of constructors. You may need to launch the compiler several times, but it's still faster than typing them yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting! This strategy is probably something that should be built into Haskell IDEs? – Jörg W Mittag Dec 3 '10 at 15:32
    
Well, I'd rather not have all those compile warnings --an additional one would get lost in the shear number that would be produced. I actually had no idea you can do or matches within tuples like that. That should save some lines, thanks. – nlucaroni Dec 3 '10 at 15:33
    
@nlucaroni In case I did not make that clear, I am only suggesting to get the warning temporarily because it contains a catch-all non-fragile pattern to copy-paste back into the code. – Pascal Cuoq Dec 3 '10 at 15:35
    
Ah, I missed that, thanks. – nlucaroni Dec 3 '10 at 15:35
    
@Jörg In case someone decides to do that, another instance of the same trick is to write val f:unit in the signature of a module where f is in fact a function with a complicated type that you do not feel confident writing yourself. The error message contains the type of f as implemented in the module. Not sure how that one translates to Haskell, though. – Pascal Cuoq Dec 3 '10 at 15:40

It's only a matter of taste/style, but I tend to prefer grouping clauses on the same constructor together, rather than having the useful clauses for everything first, then all the "absurd cases" together. This can be quite helpful when you get to write several "useful" clauses for one given constructor, and want to check you didn't forget anything.

let median a b = match a,b with
  | States xs, States ys ->
    assert( (Array.length xs) = (Array.length ys) );
    States (Array.init (Array.length xs) (fun i -> xs.(i) lor ys.(i)))
  | States _, _ -> assert false

  | Chars xs, Chars ys -> 
    assert( (Array.length xs) = (Array.length ys) );
    let union c1 c2 = (List.filter (fun x -> not (List.mem x c2)) c1) @ c2 in
    Chars (Array.init (Array.length xs) (fun i -> union xs.(i) ys.(i)))
  | Chars _, _ -> assert false
share|improve this answer

This is pretty hackish (and results in warnings) but you can use Obj to check if the tags are equal or not. It should catch all cases where a and b have different values:

type data = | States of int array 
            | Chars  of (char list) array

let median a b = match a,b with
    | States xs, States ys ->
        assert( (Array.length xs) = (Array.length ys) );
        States (Array.init (Array.length xs) (fun i -> xs.(i) lor ys.(i)))
    | Chars xs, Chars ys -> 
        assert( (Array.length xs) = (Array.length ys) );
        let union c1 c2 = (List.filter (fun x -> not (List.mem x c2)) c1) @ c2 in
        Chars (Array.init (Array.length xs) (fun i -> union xs.(i) ys.(i)))
    (* inconsistent pairs of matching *)
    | x, y when (Obj.tag (Obj.repr x)) <> (Obj.tag (Obj.repr y)) -> assert false

The warning is for non-exhaustive pattern-matching (since it can't tell whether or not the guarded clause matches the rest or not).

EDIT: you don't need to use Obj at all, you can just compare x and y directly:

| x, y when x <> y -> assert false

Though this still results in a warning, unfortunately.

share|improve this answer
2  
In my opinion, the very point of these warning is not to ensure that the execution goes all right, but that you will get warned, if you change the datatype, to reconsider this pattern and possibly implement a new behavior adapted to the changes. Your technique is dynamically clever, but doesn't give those useful warnings (or turn them into noise) that very much help maintainability. – gasche Dec 3 '10 at 17:04
3  
My solution is even worse than that! It doesn't take into account constant Constructors. I'm going to edit it for that, but yeah, losing the value of warnings is almost certainly not worth it. – Niki Yoshiuchi Dec 3 '10 at 17:36

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