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How do I programmatically determine the availability of a port in a given machine using Java?

i.e given a port number, determine whether it is already being used or not?.

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1  
While this question is about how to know if a given port is already in use, you may have landed here trying to find a way to obtain a free port number, which stackoverflow.com/questions/2675362/… (with link to my gist.github.com/3429822) covers better. –  vorburger Aug 22 '12 at 22:12

6 Answers 6

This is the implementation coming from the Apache camel project:

/**
 * Checks to see if a specific port is available.
 *
 * @param port the port to check for availability
 */
public static boolean available(int port) {
    if (port < MIN_PORT_NUMBER || port > MAX_PORT_NUMBER) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid start port: " + port);
    }

    ServerSocket ss = null;
    DatagramSocket ds = null;
    try {
        ss = new ServerSocket(port);
        ss.setReuseAddress(true);
        ds = new DatagramSocket(port);
        ds.setReuseAddress(true);
        return true;
    } catch (IOException e) {
    } finally {
        if (ds != null) {
            ds.close();
        }

        if (ss != null) {
            try {
                ss.close();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                /* should not be thrown */
            }
        }
    }

    return false;
}

They are checking the DatagramSocket as well to check if the port is avaliable in UDP and TCP.

Hope this helps.

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2  
A nice variant of this if you have MINA is AvailablePortFinder.getNextAvailable(1024) which gets you the next non-privileged port. –  Alain O'Dea Jun 27 '11 at 18:24
8  
This doesn't catch everything however. I've been bitten by a running nginx on TCP 8000 whilst the above routine reports 8000 as available. No idea why -- I suspect nginx does some sneaky stuff (this is on OS X). Workaround for me is to do the above and also to open a new Socket("localhost", port) then return false if we don't get an exception. Thoughts? –  Partly Cloudy Jan 16 '12 at 22:59
    
I've had the same issue with OS X. –  OmerGertel Feb 28 '12 at 19:59
2  
Same issue on Windows trying to detect if papercut SMTP server is running. A solution where you open a connection to a port, rather than trying to bind to a it (as suggested by Partly Clodys comment and Ivan's answer) seems to work more reliable. –  stian Dec 6 '12 at 12:46
1  
Interesting. The call to setReuseAddress() is completely pointless after the socket is already bound, and it it also completely contrary to the purpose of the code. –  EJP Mar 30 '13 at 23:59

If you're not too concerned with performance you could always try listening on a port using the ServerSocket class. If it throws an exception odds are it's being used.

boolean portTaken = false;
    ServerSocket socket = null;
    try {
        socket = new ServerSocket(_port);
    } catch (IOException e) {
        portTaken = true;
    } finally {
        if (socket != null)
            try {
                socket.close();
            } catch (IOException e) { /* e.printStackTrace(); */ }
}

EDIT: If all you're trying to do is select a free port then new SocketServer(0) will find one for you.

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Use finally for cleanup (try { ... } catch { ... } finally { if (socket != null) socket.close(); } –  Hosam Aly Jan 12 '09 at 7:51
    
You can also set "portTaken = (socket == null);" at the end instead of doing it in the catch. –  Hosam Aly Jan 12 '09 at 7:52
    
Thanks for the recommendation. –  Spencer Ruport Jan 12 '09 at 8:00
1  
Is there a way to do it without try/catch? I wouldn't mind using any available port for my purposes, but iterating over port numbers and try/catch-ing over each one until I find a free one is a little wasteful. Isn't there a 'native boolean available(int)' method somewhere, which just checks? –  Oz. May 21 '09 at 12:41
15  
new SeverSocket(0) will automatically select a free port . –  Spencer Ruport May 21 '09 at 16:32

It appears that as of Java 7, David Santamaria's answer doesn't work reliably any more. It looks like you can still reliably use a Socket to test the connection, however.

private static boolean available(int port) {
    System.out.println("--------------Testing port " + port);
    Socket s = null;
    try {
        s = new Socket("localhost", port);

        // If the code makes it this far without an exception it means
        // something is using the port and has responded.
        System.out.println("--------------Port " + port + " is not available");
        return false;
    } catch (IOException e) {
        System.out.println("--------------Port " + port + " is available");
        return true;
    } finally {
        if( s != null){
            try {
                s.close();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                throw new RuntimeException("You should handle this error." , e);
            }
        }
    }
}
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1  
Tested both solutions and I can confirm TwentyMiles is right –  betaman Sep 29 '13 at 18:48

For Java 7 you can use try-with-resource for more compact code:

private static boolean available(int port) {
    try (Socket ignored = new Socket("localhost", port)) {
        return false;
    } catch (IOException ignored) {
        return true;
    }
}
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In my case it helped to try and connect to the port - if service is already present, it would respond.

    try {
        log.debug("{}: Checking if port open by trying to connect as a client", portNumber);
        Socket sock = new Socket("localhost", portNumber);          
        sock.close();
        log.debug("{}: Someone responding on port - seems not open", portNumber);
        return false;
    } catch (Exception e) {         
        if (e.getMessage().contains("refused")) {
            return true;
    }
        log.error("Troubles checking if port is open", e);
        throw new RuntimeException(e);              
    }
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The try/catch socket based solutions , might not yield accurate results (the socket address is "localhost" and in some cases the port could be "occupied" not by the loopback interface and at least on Windows I've seen this test fails i.e. the prot falsely declared as available).

There is a cool library named SIGAR , the following code can hook you up :

Sigar sigar = new Sigar();
int flags = NetFlags.CONN_TCP | NetFlags.CONN_SERVER | NetFlags.CONN_CLIENT;             NetConnection[] netConnectionList = sigar.getNetConnectionList(flags);
for (NetConnection netConnection : netConnectionList) {
   if ( netConnection.getLocalPort() == port )
        return false;
}
return true;
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I get: "no sigar-x86-winnt.dll in java.library.path" Unfortunately it requires download of some additional dll that is not really viable in enterprise environment (I have no control over CI system). So bad.... Thanks anyway. –  uthomas Apr 18 '13 at 14:02
    
@uthomas I guess you still have control on your app deployment package, if this is the case you can always provide Sigar native runtime DLL/SOs near your JARs and set the JAVA lib path pragmatically (via simple hack you can influence it even after your app has launched by the JVM). –  Shmil The Cat Apr 19 '13 at 10:04

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