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MyClass[] array;
List<MyClass> list;

What are the scenarios when one is preferable over the other? And why?

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Arrays are rather obsolete, as seen in a popular discussion here. Also pointed out here, and by our host in the blog. –  gimel Jan 12 '09 at 8:14
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If I'm not mistaken the List<> has an array as internal structure. Whenever the internal array is filled it simply copy the content to an array that is double the size (or some other constant times the current size). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_array –  Ykok Sep 12 '13 at 12:15
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9 Answers

up vote 182 down vote accepted

It is rare, in reality, that you would want to use an array. Definitely use a List<T> any time you want to add/remove data, since resizing arrays is expensive. If you know the data is fixed length, and you want to micro-optimise for some very specific reason (after benchmarking), then an array may be useful.

List<T> offers a lot more functionality than an array (although LINQ evens it up a bit), and is almost always the right choice. Except for params arguments, of course ;-p

As a counter - List<T> is one-dimensional; where-as you have have rectangular (etc) arrays like int[,] or string[,,] - but there are other ways of modelling such data (if you need) in an object model.

See also:

That said, I make a lot of use of arrays in my protobuf-net project; entirely for performance:

  • it does a lot of bit-shifting, so a byte[] is pretty much essential for encoding
  • I use a local rolling byte[] buffer which I fill before sending down to the underlying stream (and v.v.); quicker than BufferedStream etc
  • it internally uses an array-based model of objects (Foo[] rather than List<Foo>), since the size is fixed once built, and needs to be very fast

But this is definitely an exception; for general line-of-business processing, a List<T> wins every time.

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The argument about resizing is totally valid. However people prefer Lists even when no resizing is needed. For this latter case, is there a solid, logical argument or is it nothing more than "arrays are out of fashion"? –  Frederick The Fool Jan 12 '09 at 8:25
    
@Frederick: hard to answer without hearing the "why". Actually, in many cases I'd prefer IList<T> or IEnumerable<T> - it lets the caller decide what they want to use (T[] or List<T> etc). LINQ largely balances out a lot of the extra List<T> functions (over IList<T>). –  Marc Gravell Jan 12 '09 at 8:28
    
Actually, I'm working with a legacy, C# 1.0 codebase. Some of the functions there take and return arrays. No resizing or anything is happening.... –  Frederick The Fool Jan 12 '09 at 8:37
    
...Now, in my wrapper functions, I'm inclined to use List<T>'s instead of arrays. But I have no solid reasoning to justify this. Just a warm fuzzy feeling. I need a good argument for my decision. –  Frederick The Fool Jan 12 '09 at 8:38
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"Definitely use a List<T> any time you want to add/remove data, since resizing arrays is expensive." List<T> uses an array internally. Were you thinking of LinkedList<T>? –  Dangph Mar 9 '10 at 6:49
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Really just answering to add a link which I'm surprised hasn't been mentioned yet: Eric's Lippert's blog entry on "Arrays considered somewhat harmful."

You can judge from the title that it's suggesting using collections wherever practical - but as Marc rightly points out, there are plenty of places where an array really is the only practical solution.

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Finally got around to reading this over 3 years later haha. Good article then, good article now. :) –  Spencer Ruport Apr 20 '12 at 19:36
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Use an array when you are dealing with data that is:

  • fixed in size, or unlikely to grow much
  • suitably large (more than 10, 50, 100 elements, depending on the algorithm)
  • you will be doing lots of indexing into it, i.e. you know you will often want the third element, or the fifth, or whatever.

Use a list for:

  • variable length data lists
  • that are mostly used as a stack or a queue or need to be iterated in its entirety
  • when you do not want to write an expression to derive the ultimate array size for the declaration and you do not want to wastefully pick a large number

Use a hashmap for:

  • variable length data lists
  • that need to be indexed like an array would

In reality, you'll want a list or hashmap almost all of the time. Next time you pick a data structure, think about what it must do well for you (or your code, anyway). Then pick something based on that. When in doubt, pick something as general as possible, i.e. an interface you can replace the implementation of quite easily. Some good links in the other answers as well.

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Notwithstanding the other answers recommending List<T>, you'll want to use arrays when handling:

  • image bitmap data
  • other low-level data-structures (i.e. network protocols)
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Why for network protocols? Wouldn't you rather use custom structures here and give them an special serializer or an explicit memory layout? Furthermore, what speaks against using a List<T> here rather than a byte array? –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 12 '09 at 8:28
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@Konrad - well, for starters, Stream.Read and Stream.Write work with byte[], as does Encoding etc... –  Marc Gravell Jan 12 '09 at 8:37
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Unless you are really concerned with performance, and by that I mean, "Why are you using .Net instead of C++?" you should stick with List<>. It's easier to maintain and does all the dirty work of resizing an array behind the scenes for you. (If necessary, List<> is pretty smart about choosing array sizes so it doesn't need to usually.)

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"Why are you using .Net instead of C++?" XNA –  Bengt Jun 12 '11 at 4:54
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If I know exactly how many elements I'm going to need, say I need 5 elements and only ever 5 elements then I use an array. Otherwise I just use a List<T>.

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Most of the times, using a List would suffice. A List uses an internal array to handle its data, and automatically resizes the array when adding more elements to the List than its current capacity, which makes it more easy to use than an array, where you need to know the capacity beforehand.

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms379570(v=vs.80).aspx#datastructures20_1_topic5 for more information about Lists in C# or just decompile System.Collections.Generic.List<T>.

If you need multidimensional data (for example using a matrix or in graphics programming), you would probably go with an array instead.

As always, if memory or performance is an issue, measure it! Otherwise you could be making false assumptions about the code.

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Hi, could you explain why "A list's lookup time would be O(n)" is true? As far as I know List<T> uses array behind the scenes. –  dragonfly Aug 7 '12 at 6:54
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@dragonfly you're totally right. Source. At the time, I assumed that the implementation used pointers, but I've since learned otherwise. From the link above: 'Retrieving the value of this property is an O(1) operation; setting the property is also an O(1) operation.' –  Sune Rievers Aug 7 '12 at 8:30
    
Great, thanks for answer. –  dragonfly Aug 7 '12 at 8:31
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It completely depends on the contexts in which the data structure is needed. For example, if you are creating items to be used by other functions or services using List is the perfect way to accomplish it.

Now if you have a list of items and you just want to display them, say on a web page array is the container you need to use.

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If you have a list of items and you just want to display them, then what is wrong with just using the list you already have? What would an array offer here? –  Marc Gravell Jan 12 '09 at 8:18
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And for "creating items to be used by other functions or services", actually, I'd prefer an iterator block with IEnumerable<T> - then I can stream objects rather than buffer them. –  Marc Gravell Jan 12 '09 at 8:47
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Agree with Marc + for interoperability you can't have List<> as argument of a method

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