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I have a PC with a TV card, it connects to an antenna via a coaxial cable, so at the back of PC there is a coaxial cable connector, the PC is in the basement. 60 feet apart in the living room above there is a big screen TV, the only way I can think of to possibly transfer a signal from the PC to the TV is an existing coaxial cable which extends from the basement all the way to the TV, so I wonder if there is a way to write a Java program to send TV signal streams to the TV via the coaxial cable ? A few points need to be mentioned here :

  1. I've thought of HDMI, but no HDMI line can be 60 feet long.
  2. Can't move the PC closer to the TV.
  3. Don't want to buy extra hardware to transmit signal from PC to TV
  4. I know the coaxial cable connector at the back of the PC is for taking in antenna signal not for output use. What I'm attempting is to use it to output signal.

Is it doable ? If so where can I find some sample Java code ?

Edit : This is just a technical challenge to see how far I can go with Java on the software side, sort of flexing the intellectual muscle, so to speak. Trying to send Internet video stream info from PC to a TV via a coaxial cable between them.

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Offer a bounty for that one! –  Nick Dec 3 '10 at 16:31
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"I know the coaxial cable connector at the back of the PC is for taking in antenna signal not for output use. What I'm attempting is to use it to output signal. Is it doable ?" Sounds like you've answered your own question. –  PeterT Dec 3 '10 at 16:31
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Nice question. However if you're trying to do it this way because you'd rather not buy more hardware, I think you're in over your head. This dabbles in drivers which instantaneously launches this question into a new level of pain and frustration. –  Neil Dec 3 '10 at 16:35
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Given point #4, I don't think you'll have much luck (although I'd be happy to be proven wrong!) If you can overcome that, though, I expect you'll need native drivers and a JNI wrapper to do it in Java... –  eaj Dec 3 '10 at 16:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As other people have said, there's no way to do this with the TV in card, as that's built for taking an NTSC (Or ATSC/QAM if it's newer) signal and converting it into a MPEG stream.

I know that an NTSC composite black and white signal (I imagine PAL too, I think the two are similar for luma) with a micocontroller, a few pins, some resistors, and judicious use of cycle counting.

If you can get low level (e.g. bit-banging) control of a parallel port from Java, you might be able to do something similar, if you get the timing tight enough.

However, I see several possible issues:

  1. I don't know if the parallel port can bit-bang fast enough to do this (I know an 8051 running somewhere around 12MHz can barely pull this off)
  2. Any modern multitasking operating system will probably context-switch away to another thread while trying to do this, and throwing off timings.
  3. On top of context switches, I know the garbage collector in .Net (I'm not a java dev, so I'm not sure on the java side of things here), will pause active threads to collect (At least in versions previous to 4, i think that changed in 4), this will, again, affect timing.
  4. I don't know if parallel signals will travel 60ft.
  5. If somehow all of the above prove possible, you have a low resolution, monochrome display (4 digital lines would net you 16 shades of gray on the other end, with the appropriate resistors)
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get a modded xbox with XBMC ($50-60 but won't handle high def), an xbox 360, a ps3, a slingbox, or any other network video solution and stream it across your network

edit: for all intents and purposes, it can't be done

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EDIT: NO IT CANNOT BE DONE


Buy an AppleTV and stream what you want across your wireless network.

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He clearly stated he wants to know if it's possible to do it with java. Not sure why this is even an answer? –  Matt Phillips Dec 3 '10 at 17:05
    
@Matt, better now? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Dec 3 '10 at 17:33

I doubt you can make the TV card input socket output anything without low-level access to the card's firmware and possibly some hardware hacking. Certainly not with Java, and even if you could, there are easier ways to output a video signal from a computer.

Nonetheless, assuming your TV has a tuner (i.e. it's not just a monitor), you can always plug the aerial into the TV as well. All you need is a BNC T-piece (e.g.) and an extra length of cable. That way, your aerial goes to both the TV and the computer. As a bonus, you'll be able to get a different channels on both.

[edit]Having re-read your question, I think I'm barking up the wrong tree. Is what you want to do use your TV card to use your TV as essentially an external monitor? I doubt very much that this is possible. The card isn't designed to transmit a signal - it's designed to receive only (unlike, say, a network adapter, which is two-way). Nice as it would be, having the connectors is only part of the story (an analogy would be trying to use a scanner as a printer - both involve images, but one is for inputting images, while the other is for outputting images). You'll be far easier buying some sort of video over IP system, as has already been suggested by others.

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I intend to stream Internet video to the TV via the cable. PC can get the signal from IP connection, then use the connector to send the signal to the TV. No antenna is involved. –  Frank Dec 3 '10 at 20:15
    
Then, no: it can't be done - at least, not using your TV card. There are ways to do it - either get a box that connects to your TV and transfers the video over IP (either direct from the internet or via your computer), or use an output from your video card (possibly with an adaptor) to connect to the TV with a more amenable cable. I'm sure I read somewhere about doing DVI over Cat5 - there are undoubtedly others, one of which may suit you. I realise that both these solutions require buying hardware, which you wanted to avoid, but this is a hardware issue - no amount of Java will fix it. –  Scott Dec 4 '10 at 4:01
    
Alright, that's what I wanted to know. –  Frank Dec 6 '10 at 18:09

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