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I came across this piece of code today while tutoring some students in a C programming language course. The exercise asked to implement two functions. The first one scans input from a user and the second displays what has been previously scanned. The code I came across is the following:


#include <stdio.h>

void myInput(int i,int n)
{
  int cpt;
  int tab[n];   

  for ( cpt=0; cpt<n; cpt++)
  {
    printf("Enter a number :");
    scanf("%d",&i); 
    tab[cpt]=i;
   }
 }



void myDisp (int n)
{
  int tab[n];      
  int cpt;

  for ( cpt=0; cpt <n; cpt++)
  {
    printf("%d ", tab[cpt]); 
  } 
}

int main()
{
  int n; int i;
  printf(" Entrer the numbers of elements you want: \n");
  scanf("%d \n",&n);
  int tab[n];
  myInput(i,n);         
  myDisp(n);
}

Although this code is full of inconsistencies, it does actually work under gcc 4.4.3: it displays the numbers that have been input!!!!!! Does anyone understands how come these code works?

Thanks very much

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For future reference: please highlight your code and press Ctrl+K or click on the button with '0 1' and such to format your code. Thanks. –  birryree Dec 3 '10 at 16:53
    
This is perfectly valid C99, from what I can see. –  Electro Dec 3 '10 at 16:57
    
@Electro, @birryree: He probably is looking at the use of the uninitialized variable tab in myDisp. –  Thanatos Dec 3 '10 at 16:59
    
-1 for "Why does incorrect code give a result that looks like what I wanted it to do?" C does not guarantee that incorrect code gives wrong results, and only weakly guarantees that correct code gives correct results... ;-) –  R.. Dec 3 '10 at 17:46
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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If that works, it's through sheer dumb luck. What is printed in myDisp is uninitialized stack, which may or may not contain the data that was put into similarly named variables in myInput. Related reading

Here's an easy way to break it with do-nothing code:

void myInput(int i,int n)
{
  // Add some variables to mess up the stack positioning.
  int breaker;
  int cpt;
  int stomper;
  int tab[n];
  int smasher;

  for ( cpt=0; cpt<n; cpt++)
  {
    printf("Enter a number :");
    scanf("%d",&i); 
    tab[cpt]=i;
   }

  // Trick the compiler into thinking these variables do something.
  breaker = 1;
  smasher = 3 * breaker;
  stomper = smasher + breaker;
  breaker = stomper * smasher;
 }

Another way to break it would be to put a function call (say, to printf) between the calls to myInput and myDisp.

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3  
To expand: You may be getting lucky that myDisp is allocating tab in the same segment of memory as in the other functions. It appears to work, but the code is not correct, and needs fixing. –  Thanatos Dec 3 '10 at 17:00
    
Hi Nathon! I've just recompiled under gcc and run it. It works. It displays the numbres I've input!!! –  strangeLoop Dec 3 '10 at 17:02
    
@strangeLoop: Sure, but try compiling with -O3. Does it still work? Does it display all the numbers you input in the correct order? –  nmichaels Dec 3 '10 at 17:03
    
Hi Thanatos! Since the memory is not freed at the end of myDisp, it should be lost. So the pointer in myDisp should not point to this memory location!! Am I wrong? –  strangeLoop Dec 3 '10 at 17:05
    
@Nathon: Yes It actually works when compiled with -O3 –  strangeLoop Dec 3 '10 at 17:07
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Since the two arrays are completely separate it really should not work. If it does it's just because they ended up in the same location in memory.

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It doesn't work, at least not consistently. Granted I have gcc 4.4.4 not 4.4.3

$ ./a.out
 Entrer the numbers of elements you want:
5
2
Enter a number :Enter a number :4
Enter a number :1
Enter a number :2
Enter a number :3
2 4 1 134514562 3

Moral of the story is when you access uninitialized memory, anything can happen, including the appearance of working.

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Ok, thanks SiegeX, I'll give it a try with gcc 4.4.4. –  strangeLoop Dec 3 '10 at 17:13
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Probably it works because the memory location of the tab local to myInput e myDisp happens to be (almost?) the same.

It doesn't sound so weird to me: myInput and myDisp have almost the same signature (they differ for just one int parameter); even in the worst case scenario the locations on the stack referred by tab in the two functions would be still correctly aligned and shifted at most by two ints (i and cpt in myInput).

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It appears the program is accessing the same memory location for every array int tab[n] you declared but, as mentioned, it should not work.

But I think what's happening here is something like: you are allocating tab[] inside main(), let's say, under the address 0x00000001 (take it as an example only). The array have n integers but no values at all.

Then you go into myInput(), declare the array again (same size), in other address, like 0x001F0000, and then set the values, one by one.

So, when the function terminates, it frees the allocated memory of its variables, so your array does not exist anymore.

But wait, this is C, so when you free the memory, you only tells the heap (or the memory allocator, in general) that the addresses can be used again. You do NOT exactly remove the values from memory.

Then you call myDisp() and declare your array again. It appears the memory you just requested has higher priority and then it is somewhat given again to your program. So your array is again instanciated and on the same address.

So, even if you did not fill it with values, the memory is read (as it is always valid in C) and the values are still there.

Oh, and the array declared inside main()? Nothing happens to that. Try to print its values and I bet you'll not have the correct ones.

That is my guess.

EDIT: Just to see things happening: try to declare another array after tab (do not rename tab), say tab2, same length, and use it to put your values instead of tab, then let the program run again :)

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Yes, well the array in the main() scope is completely useless. I just rewrote the code as I was given. Should this array declaration be commented of, the code still runs and gives the good values! –  strangeLoop Dec 3 '10 at 17:18
    
Sure. I'm blamming the memory heap for this situation. In my opinion, as I stated, You declare that array and the heap gives you one address X because it was on top of the heap. Then you free X and it will top the heap again (sounds odd), and then the heap will give you the same address when you declare tab again. –  Giuliano Dec 3 '10 at 17:27
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