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The following code of mine should detect whether T has begin and end methods:

template <typename T>
struct is_container
{
    template <typename U, typename U::const_iterator (U::*)() const,
                          typename U::const_iterator (U::*)() const>
    struct sfinae {};

    template <typename U> static char test(sfinae<U, &U::begin, &U::end>*);
    template <typename U> static long test(...);

    enum { value = (1 == sizeof test<T>(0)) };
};

And here is some test code:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <list>
#include <set>
#include <map>

int main()
{
    std::cout << is_container<std::vector<std::string> >::value << ' ';
    std::cout << is_container<std::list<std::string> >::value << ' ';
    std::cout << is_container<std::set<std::string> >::value << ' ';
    std::cout << is_container<std::map<std::string, std::string> >::value << '\n';
}

On g++ 4.5.1, the output is 1 1 1 1. On Visual Studio 2008, however, the output is 1 1 0 0. Did I do something wrong, or is this simply a VS 2008 bug? Can anyone test on a different compiler? Thanks!

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Worked for me on MinGW g++ 4.4.0 (got 1 1 1 1). Unfortunately I have no idea why it fails on VS2008, although the code looks correct. –  Derrick Turk Dec 3 '10 at 17:11
    
Same on VS2010 1 1 0 0. I had a hunch it might be debugging STL so I tried /DDEBUG and /DNDEBUG but didn't make any difference. –  Rup Dec 3 '10 at 17:14
1  
You could have a look at the HAS_XXX facility provided by Boost.MPL to see how they work around limited SFINAE capacities of certain compilers. –  Luc Touraille Dec 3 '10 at 17:24
    
Another data point: Comeau (uses EDG, usually a good to-the-letter-of-the-standard test) appears to return 1 1 1 1 - your program compiled fine on their online try-it-out comeaucomputing.com/tryitout with the long line commented out. –  Rup Dec 3 '10 at 18:13
    
@Rup: Can you actually run the program on their tryitout website? –  FredOverflow Dec 3 '10 at 18:25
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5 Answers

So, here's how I go about debugging these things.

First, comment out the negative alternative so you get an error instead of just a mismatch. Next, try to instantiate the type you're putting in the function with one of the items that do not work.

At this step, I was able to instantiate your sfinae object but it still wasn't working. This lets me know it IS a VS bug, so the question then is how to fix it.

VS seems to have troubles with SFINAE when done the way you are. It works better when you wrap up your sfinae object. I did that like so:

template <typename U, typename it_t = typename U::const_iterator >
struct sfinae 
{
  // typedef typename U::const_iterator it_t; - fails to compile with non-cont types.  Not sfinae
  template < typename U, typename IT, IT (U::*)() const, IT (U::*)() const >
  struct type_ {};

  typedef type_<U,it_t,&U::begin,&U::end> type;
};

Still wasn't working, but at least I got a useful error message:

error C2440: 'specialization' : cannot convert from 'overloaded-function' to 'std::_Tree_const_iterator<_Mytree> (__thiscall std::set<_Kty>::* )(void) const'

This lets me know that &U::end is not sufficient for VS to be able to tell which end() I want. A static_cast fixes that:

  typedef type_<U,it_t,static_cast<it_t (U::*)() const>(&U::begin),static_cast<it_t (U::*)() const>(&U::end)> type;

Put it all back together and run your test program on it...success with VS2010. You might find that a static_cast is actually all you need, but I left that to you to find out.

I suppose the real question now is, which compiler is right? My bet is on the one that was consistent: g++.

Edit: Jeesh...

template <typename T>
struct is_container
{
    template <typename U, typename it_t = typename U::const_iterator > 
    struct sfinae 
    {
      //typedef typename U::const_iterator it_t;
      template < typename U, typename IT, IT (U::*)() const, IT (U::*)() const >
      struct type_ {};

      typedef type_<U,it_t,static_cast<it_t (U::*)() const>(&U::begin),static_cast<it_t (U::*)() const>(&U::end)> type;
    };

    template <typename U> static char test(typename sfinae<U>::type*);
    template <typename U> static long test(...);

    enum { value = (1 == sizeof test<T>(0)) };
};



#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <list>
#include <set>
#include <map>

int main()
{
    std::cout << is_container<std::vector<std::string> >::value << ' ';
    std::cout << is_container<std::list<std::string> >::value << ' ';
    std::cout << is_container<std::set<std::string> >::value << ' ';
    std::cout << is_container<std::map<std::string, std::string> >::value << ' ';
    std::cout << is_container<bool>::value << '\n';
}
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1  
@sbi @John @Rup Sadly, this code does not work. If the type does not have begin or end methods, it does not compile. –  FredOverflow Dec 4 '10 at 8:38
    
@Fred: But your original code also checked for begin()/end(), didn't it? (And what class would have a nested const_iterator type, but no begin()/end() returning it?) –  sbi Dec 4 '10 at 11:17
3  
@sbi: SFINAE means "substitution failure is not an error". If T does not have begin and end methods, then is_container<T>::value should still compile (and yield false). And that's exactly what my code does correctly in g++. –  FredOverflow Dec 4 '10 at 11:29
    
The question was asking about problems wrt the MS compiler. The solution I provided indeed works as requested in MSVC. –  Crazy Eddie Dec 27 '10 at 6:49
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Why are you going to all that effort? If you want to check if U::begin() exists, why not try it?

template <typename T>
struct is_container
{
    template <typename U> static char test(U* u,
       typename U::const_iterator b = ((U*)0)->begin(),
       typename U::const_iterator e = ((U*)0)->end());
    template <typename U> static long test(...);

    enum { value = (1 == sizeof test<T>(0)) };
};

In addition to checking for the existance of U::begin() and U::end(), this also checks whether they return something that is convertible to a const_iterator. It also avoids the pitfall highlighted by Stephan T. Lavavej by using a call expression that must be supported, instead of assuming a particular signature.

[edit] Sorry, this relied on VC10's template instantiation. Better approach (puts the existance check in the argument types, which do participate in overloading):

template <typename T> struct is_container
{
    // Is.
    template <typename U>
    static char test(U* u, 
                     int (*b)[sizeof(typename U::const_iterator()==((U*)0)->begin())] = 0,
                     int (*e)[sizeof(typename U::const_iterator()==((U*)0)->end())] = 0);
    // Is not.
    template <typename U> static long test(...);

    enum { value = (1 == sizeof test<T>(0)) };
};
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Tested on VS2005, works fine even for is_container<std::set<std::string> >::value (is true) –  MSalters Dec 10 '10 at 15:25
    
typename U::const_iterator b = ((U*)0)->begin(), when we populate the default argument, it's doesn't calls the begin ?, can you please explain concepts why begin (((U*)0)->begin()) doesn't get's called? , Thanks a lot :) –  Mr.Anubis Feb 24 '12 at 20:35
    
@Mr.Anubis: A default argument is evaluated at the point where the function is called. Since test<T>() isn't actually called (sizeof(expr) doesn't evaluate the expression), default arguments aren't evaluated either. However, sizeof(test<T>(0)) does need to do overload resolution to determine the return type. –  MSalters Feb 27 '12 at 9:14
    
So, when we do this ((U*)0)->begin() , (even test<T>() isn't called) it just checks the compatibility whether non-type arg b's type is same as type of expression ((U*)0)->begin() , right? . Thanks a lot:) –  Mr.Anubis Feb 27 '12 at 9:19
    
@Mr.Anubis: Yes, and that in turn requires that U has a member begin, which answers the original question. –  MSalters Feb 27 '12 at 9:27
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With C++11, there are now better ways to detect this. Instead of relying on the signature of functions, we simply call them in an expression SFINAE context:

#include <type_traits> // declval

template<class T>
class is_container{
  typedef char (&two)[2];

  template<class U> // non-const
  static auto test(typename U::iterator*, int)
      -> decltype(std::declval<U>().begin(), char());

  template<class U> // const
  static auto test(typename U::const_iterator*, long)
      -> decltype(std::declval<U const>().begin(), char());

  template<class>
  static two  test(...);

public:
  static bool const value = sizeof(test<T>(0, 0)) == 1;
};

Live example on Ideone. The int and long parameters are only to disambiguate overload resolution when the container offers both (or if iterator is typedef const_iterator iterator, like std::set is allowed to) - literal 0 is of type int and forces the first overload to be chosen.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Stephan T. Lavavej has this to say:

Please note that it is technically forbidden to take the address of a Standard Library member function. (They can be overloaded, making &foo::bar ambiguous, and they can have additional default arguments, defeating attempts to disambiguate via static_cast.)

So I guess I'm going to use the simpler version that only checks for the nested const_iterator type.

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This probably should be a comment, but I don't have enough points

@MSalters

Even though your is_container works (almost) and I've used your code myself, I've discovered two problems in it.

First is that type deque<T>::iterator is detected as a container (in gcc-4.7). It seems that deque<T>::iterator has begin/end members and const_iterator type defined.

2nd problem is that this code is invalid according to GCC devs. I qoute: values of default arguments are not part of the function type and do not take part in deduction. See GCC bug 51989

I am currently using this (C++11 only) for is_container<T>:

template <typename T>
struct is_container {
    template <
        typename U,
        typename S = decltype (((U*)0)->size()),
        typename I = typename U::const_iterator
    >
    static char test(U* u);
    template <typename U> static long test(...);
    enum { value = sizeof test<T>(0) == 1 };
};
share|improve this answer
    
So is deque not a container? –  FredOverflow Feb 8 '12 at 15:57
    
deque is a container, but deque<T>::iterator is not. –  Leonid Volnitsky Feb 10 '12 at 9:26
    
2nd problem is real. I overlooked 14.7.1/2; default arguments are not instantiated with the template themselves. –  MSalters Feb 27 '12 at 9:42
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