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Given:

myChart = new ganttChart("chart1");

function ganttChart(gContainerID) {

    this.variable1 = "lol";
    this.variable2 = "hai dere";
    this.variable3 = "cometishian";

....
    this.gContainer = document.getElementById(gContainerID);
    this.gContainer.innerHTML += "<div id=\"gBar" + i + 
            "\" class=\"gBar\" onmousedown=\"gInitBarDrag(this)\">Hello</div>";
....
}

How would I make the function gInitBarDrag() defined inside the ganttChart class? I don't want an exterior standalone function as it needs to reference things inside the object.

So for example, the function would be able to reference variable1/2/3 which are defined in a specific instance of the ganttChart object (you can have multiple chart objects).

Hope that makes sense! EG:

function ganttChart(gContainerID) {

    this.variable1 = "lol";
    this.variable2 = "hai dere";
    this.variable3 = "cometishian";

....
    this.gContainer.innerHTML += "<div id=\"gBar" + i + 
            "\" class=\"gBar\" onmousedown=\"gInitBarDrag(this)\">Hello</div>";
....

    gInitBarDrag = function(thisGanttObject)
    {
        alert(thisGanttObject.variable2);
        // This line wont work because it doesn't know what ganttChart to reference!
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
@Tom What does the this value point to? –  Šime Vidas Dec 3 '10 at 17:12
    
The ganttchart object. –  Tom Gullen Dec 3 '10 at 17:14
    
@Tom What do you mean by "granttChart class"? granttChart is a function, and there are no classes in JavaScript, anyway. –  Šime Vidas Dec 3 '10 at 17:15
    
I think you could try to attach an event instead of declaring it in the markup, and reference the function inside ganttChart. Most of the JS framework nowadays should have an API to attach events to DOM objects. I'm not posting an answer because I'm not able to try to code that right now. If this is not answered by the time I get home, I will try to get some working code for you. –  wtaniguchi Dec 3 '10 at 17:15
    
@Tom Aha, it is a constructor function then? –  Šime Vidas Dec 3 '10 at 17:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
function gnattChart(gContainerID) {
  var div = document.createElement('div');
  div.id = 'gBar';
  div.className = 'gBar';

  //If you want to reference properties from the gnattChart object...
  //Use `self` where you'd normally use `this` in the handler function
  var self = this;

  div.onmousedown = function () {
    //contents of gInitBarDrag here...
  };

  //If you want the container to be emptied...
  this.gContainer.innerHTML = '';

  this.gContainer.appendChild(div);
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 this looks correct will try and implement it –  Tom Gullen Dec 3 '10 at 17:27
    
+1 That should do it. (Although I prefer attaching event handlers using a library) –  Šime Vidas Dec 3 '10 at 17:36
    
@Šime Vidas - It's so easy to get off on tangents when talking about Javascript isn't it. Just trying to keep things simple. I'd prefer it as well, luckily using the onevent DOMNode properties is 100% cross-browser and at least an order of magnitude better than inline event attributes, even if not completely ideal. –  MooGoo Dec 3 '10 at 18:07
this.gContainer.innerHTML += "<div id=\"gBar" + i + "\" class=\"gBar\" onmousedown=\"function(){ alert('here'); }\">Hello</div>";

Although, inline functions are generally frowned upon.

share|improve this answer
    
My eyes just died. Ugly, but +1 for correctness. –  Stephen Dec 3 '10 at 17:14
    
Sorry you miss my question point, the function needs to be able to access variables within the main ganttChart object –  Tom Gullen Dec 3 '10 at 17:17

OK, I will answer without testing it, and using prototypejs, but I'm sure you can workout the functions for yourself if you don't want to use a JS framework.

First, you will want to create your div using document.createElement instead of injecting HTML, something like this:

var d = document.createElement("div");
// Set your div properly.

Then you will have to use document.appendChild to put your new div (variable d) in your page. Now the "difficult" part: listen for mousedown events and act accordingly. You can do this by using Event.observe (prototypejs) AND bind (prototypejs) to bind your object to the listener, so you can use its variables (this.variable1, variable2, etc).

This will give a code somewhat like this:

function ganttChart(gContainerID) { 

this.variable1 = "lol"; 
this.variable2 = "hai dere"; 
this.variable3 = "cometishian"; 

// Create Element part (createElement, appendChild, etc).
var d = document.createElement("div");
// continue from here.


this.gInitBarDrag = function() 
{ 
    alert(this.variable2); 
}; 

$(d).observe("mousedown", this.gInitBarDrag.bind(this));

} 

Some notes: bind and observe can be implemented somewhat easily without a JS framework. This code is untested.

share|improve this answer

If you define a function as a property of an object, then this points to the object:

var myObject = { foo: true, bar: function(){ if(this.foo){ doStuff(); }};

If this is used in a constructor function that returns an object, then this is bound to the new object that is returned. The way you're using this in the code you posted, this points to the global scope, which is one of the bad parts of Javascript.

So, here's how I would approach this:

function GanttChart(gContainerID) {
    var chart = {
    variable1: "lol",
    variable2: "hai dere",
    variable3: "cometishian",
    containerId: gContainerID,
    gInitBarDrag: function(){
        alert(this.variable2);
        }
    }
    return chart;
}
myChart = new GanttChart("chart1");
document.getElementById(myChart.containerId).innerHTML += "<div id=\"gBar" + i + "\" class=\"gBar\" onmousedown=\"myChart.gInitBarDrag();\">Hello</div>";

I changed the ganttChart function to be capitalized because by convention, constructor functions that return an object are capitalized.

share|improve this answer
var gInitBarDrag = function(){
  ///function body here
};

function ganttChart(gContainerID) {
....

    this.gContainer.innerHTML += "<div id=\"gBar" + i + "\" class=\"gBar\" onmousedown=\"gInitBarDrag(this)\">Hello</div>";
....


}
share|improve this answer
    
Will that function be able to reference variables contained within the ganttChart object? –  Tom Gullen Dec 3 '10 at 17:14
    
No...it will look for a global function called gInitBarDrag, find none, and throw an exception –  MooGoo Dec 3 '10 at 17:17
    
copy pasting mistake. fixed it –  Ali Tarhini Dec 3 '10 at 21:47

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