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This question has been asked in different ways before, but the answers don't help me, because (1) I don't have control over the built-in Exception classes, and (2) Activator.CreateInstance() returns an object/instance, where I need a true dynamic type.

I'm trying to create an extension method that allows me to throw a FaultException out of my WCF service, based off the exception I catch. For example:

try {
    ...
}
catch (ArgumentNullException exc) {
    throw new FaultException<ArgumentNullException>(exc);
}

is straight-forward. But if I want to extend this in a general way, I'd use an extension class, like:

try {
    ...
}
catch (Exception exc) {
    exc.ThrowFaultException();
}

Where I get hung up, of course, is the implementation of the extension method:

public static void ThrowFaultException(this Exception exc) {

    //  Gives me the correct type...
    Type exceptionType = exc.GetType();

    //  But how the heck do I use it?
    throw new FaultException<???>(exc);
}

The answers here and here don't help. Any ideas?

TIA!
James

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Why can't you cast the return from Activator.CreateInstance() to Exception? It will still get thrown as its actual type, no? –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Dec 3 '10 at 19:02
    
It's a good idea to throw exception from custom code and not from some generalized method. This would help VS.Net and other code analyzers (your peers included) to detect unreachable code and related issues. –  DK. Dec 3 '10 at 19:31
    
BR/DP> What I found when I tested that solution was that the caller caught the exception under the general catch (Exception exc){} handler, not the handler for FaultException<ArgumentException> –  James King Dec 3 '10 at 19:39
    
DK> Could you elaborate on that? –  James King Dec 3 '10 at 19:40
    
James B> It's just general consideration, not directly related to the question... Imagine that later on a junior developer adds logging at the end of each exception handling. In your first code snippet with "throw" being right there, compiler will warn him right away that Log.LogError() call can not be placed after the throw statement since it will be unreachable; in fact it's unlikely that developer would even try to do it. In the situation with 2nd snippet it's more obscure for developer and there is no help from compiler. HTH. –  DK. Dec 3 '10 at 20:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this:

public static void ThrowFaultException<TException>(this TException ex) where TException : System.Exception
{
    throw new FaultException<TException>(ex);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Works perfectly!! Exactly what I wanted : ) –  James King Dec 3 '10 at 19:25
    
I constantly forget the beauty of generics! –  James King Dec 3 '10 at 19:26

You don't need to cast the object returned by Activator.CreateInstance to FaultException<?> to throw it. Casting it to Exception is enough:

var type = typeof(FaultException<>).MakeGenericType(exc.GetType());

throw (Exception)Activator.CreateInstance(type, exc);

I wouldn't throw the exception in ThrowFaultException though:

try
{
    ...
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    throw e.WrapInFaultException();
}

public static Exception WrapInFaultException(this Exception e)
{
    var type = typeof(FaultException<>).MakeGenericType(e.GetType());

    return (Exception)Activator.CreateInstance(type, e);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was just thinking about posting this, but how would he pass exc as a parameter to the constructor of the FaultException? Does CreateInstance allow for this? –  Pandincus Dec 3 '10 at 19:02
    
@Pandincus: I haven't tested it, but I believe the call to Activator.CreateInstance(Type, Object[]) shown above should work as-is. –  dtb Dec 3 '10 at 19:04
    
Nevermind, I see you edited your answer for that. Neat trick! –  Pandincus Dec 3 '10 at 19:05
    
If I do that the client catches a general exception, not a FaultException<ArgumentException> : ( –  James King Dec 3 '10 at 19:23
   public static void ThrowFaultException(this Exception exc)
    {
        //  Gives me the correct type...
        Type exceptionType = exc.GetType();
        var  genericType = typeof(FaultException<>).MakeGenericType(exceptionType);
        //  But how the heck do I use it?
        throw (Exception)Activator.CreateInstance(genericType, exc);
    }
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