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i have a quick question on how do I specialize a template for a set of datatypes. for example,

template<typename T>
inline T getRatio(T numer, T denom){
    return (numer/denom);
}

I want this to work with int, long, double, float so I want to specialize it for this set of datatypes. so that if the user tries this function with a 'char' type, the compiler would throw error. if this is a dup let me know. thanks

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So you want it to ONLY work with long, double, float, and no other types? –  EboMike Dec 3 '10 at 19:14
    
@EboMike. Yes .. –  blueskin Dec 3 '10 at 19:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As only the three data types long, double and float are relevant and their is no need for an additional generic version, just reject the template and provide three functions for long, double and float.

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+1: Just use an overload. –  Puppy Dec 3 '10 at 19:42
    
This means three functions to maintain instead of just one. It might be ok with just three and the simplicity of the function, but it makes me nervous that sometime in the future some maintenance programmer will only change some of them. –  KeithB Dec 3 '10 at 20:08
    
@KeithB - you do realize that a non-template function can call a template function, right? –  Crazy Eddie Dec 3 '10 at 20:12
    
@Noah - Yes, it just didn't occur to me to use the overloaded functions to forward to the template function. In my defense, the way the answer is worded it looks like (to me anyway) the suggestion is to write three versions of the function. –  KeithB Dec 3 '10 at 20:19
1  
@Flinsch... if you provide overloaded functions for type long, double, and float only.. then one of them would be called for char type argument as well (implicit conversion)... so that means, it's not a solution either. –  Nawaz Dec 3 '10 at 20:31

It depends on what you want to do. If you want the compiler to simply fail to find an appropriate resolution for the function call you could use Flinsch's answer, which is probably best, or you can use SFINAE:

template < typename T > is_an_ok_type : boost::mpl::false_ {};
template < > is_an_ok_type<int> : boost::mpl::true_ {};
... etc...

template < typename T >
typename boost::enable_if< is_an_ok_type<T>,T >::type
get_ratio(T t1, T t2)
{
  return t1/t2;
}

If you want some sort of reasonably readable error instead you use a static assert; either static_assert (C++0x) or BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT.

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can this solution be further simplified to put all the "etc" types in a single statement? –  ProgramCpp Jan 12 at 11:38

you might do this:

// declaration
template <typename T> inline T getRatio(T numer, T denom);

// specialization for long    
template <>
inline long getRatio<long>(long numer, long denom) { return (numer / denom); }
// specialization for float
template <>
inline float getRatio<float>(float numer, float denom) { return (numer, denom); }
// specialization for double
template <>
inline double getRatio<double>(double numer, double denom) { return (numer / denom); }

this will result in a linker error if getRatio is called with a type other than long, float or double.

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1  
Overload or SFINAE method would be preferable to this. When the compiler fails to match the function call (as with overload/sfinae) you'll normally get a line location, etc... information you can use to find the problem. With linker errors you're usually only given, at best, the object file that's trying to link to that function. –  Crazy Eddie Dec 3 '10 at 20:07
    
... or a static assertion. –  UncleBens Dec 3 '10 at 20:42

If you want to restrict your getRatio() function only for int, long, double and float, then you can use this function as well. It will generate "a meaningful" compilation error if you call it with,say, char type argument. The compilation error would be : this_type_is_not_allowed_in_getRatio .

//yourheader.h
template<typename T>
inline T getRatio(T numer, T denom)
{
    typedef typelist<int, typelist<long, typelist<double, float>>> allowedtypes;
    compile_time_checker<contains<allowedtypes, T>::result> this_type_is_not_allowed_in_getRatio;
    return (numer/denom);
}

It uses this header:

//metafunctions.h
template<typename H, typename T>
struct typelist
{
    typedef H Head;
    typedef T Tail;
};

template<typename T, typename Tail> 
struct contains
{
    static const bool result = false;
};

template<typename Head, typename Tail, typename T> 
struct contains<typelist<Head, Tail>, T>
{
    static const bool result = false || contains<Tail, T>::result;
};

template<typename T, typename Tail> 
struct contains<typelist<T, Tail>, T>
{
    static const bool result = true || contains<Tail, T>::result;
};

template<bool b> struct compile_time_checker;
template<> struct compile_time_checker<true> {};

Hope, it helps you. You can write all your code in just one function now!

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There's no way built into the language to specify that a template can only be instantiated with a certain set of type parameters. However, this will fail to compile for any type that does not have an operator / defined, which may be enough for you.

When designing APIs, it's considered good practice to avoid surprising your user, and most users would be surprised if you told them they weren't allowed to compute the ratio of two things that can be divided!

If you really don't want the default behavior, Flinsch's answer is a good compromise.

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1  
"There's no way built into the language to specify that a template can only be instantiated with a certain set of type parameters." <- simply not true. –  Crazy Eddie Dec 3 '10 at 20:00

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