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How to Calculate the Square Root of a Float in C# .. Like Core.Sqrt in XNA

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Use powerful magic - 0x5f3759df –  jball Dec 3 '10 at 21:18
    
That magic is the inverse square-root. But similar magic exists for sqrt. And this loses precision. –  CodesInChaos Dec 3 '10 at 21:22
    
@CodeInChaos - the second code sample in the article has an implementation for sqrt: "Note that the only real difference is in the return value – instead of returning y, return numbery as the square root"* –  jball Dec 3 '10 at 21:26
    
@CodeInChaos Does that mean I am to use "(float)Math.Sqrt(inputFloat)" yes? –  Chris Dec 3 '10 at 21:26
1  
yes. What jball posted in mainly a cool curiosity and only useful if performance is much more important than precision. First I'd use simple built in stuff and only switch to complicated solutions if performance really requires it, and profiling shows that the change actually matters. –  CodesInChaos Dec 3 '10 at 21:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Calculate it for double and then cast back to float. May be a bit slow, but should work.

(float)Math.Sqrt(inputFloat)
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wont it loose precision? –  Chris Dec 3 '10 at 21:14
    
I've always hoped that somehow .Net would optimize this to be an all-float (all 32-bit) operation behind the scenes. Does anyone know if this gets optimized? –  Detmar Dec 3 '10 at 21:15
1  
@Chris: no, there's a well-known theorem of floating point analysis that guarantees that this will give you the correct result. –  Stephen Canon Dec 3 '10 at 21:16
2  
Since double has a much higher precision than float the loss will be very small or non existent. By using floats you already said you don't care much about precision. –  CodesInChaos Dec 3 '10 at 21:19
1  
@CodeInChaos: note that the precision loss isn't even "very small". Assuming that the conversions and double-precision square root are correctly-rounded, this delivers a correctly-rounded single-precision square root for all possible inputs. –  Stephen Canon Dec 3 '10 at 21:40

Hate to say this, but 0x5f3759df seems to take 3x as long as Math.Sqrt. I just did some testing with timers. Math.Sqrt in a for-loop accessing pre-calculated arrays resulted in approx 80ms. 0x5f3759df under the same circumstances resulted in 180+ms

The test was conducted several times using the Release mode optimizations.

Source below:

/*
    ================
    SquareRootFloat
    ================
    */
    unsafe static void SquareRootFloat(ref float number, out float result)
    {
        long i;
        float x, y;
        const float f = 1.5F;

        x = number * 0.5F;
        y = number;
        i = *(long*)&y;
        i = 0x5f3759df - (i >> 1);
        y = *(float*)&i;
        y = y * (f - (x * y * y));
        y = y * (f - (x * y * y));
        result = number * y;
    }

    /*
    ================
    SquareRootFloat
    ================
    */
    unsafe static float SquareRootFloat(float number)
    {
        long i;
        float x, y;
        const float f = 1.5F;

        x = number * 0.5F;
        y = number;
        i = *(long*)&y;
        i = 0x5f3759df - (i >> 1);
        y = *(float*)&i;
        y = y * (f - (x * y * y));
        y = y * (f - (x * y * y));
        return number * y;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// The main entry point for the application.
    /// </summary>
    [STAThread]
    static void Main()
    {
        int Cycles = 10000000;
        Random rnd = new Random();
        float[] Values = new float[Cycles];
        for (int i = 0; i < Cycles; i++)
            Values[i] = (float)(rnd.NextDouble() * 10000.0);

        TimeSpan SqrtTime;

        float[] Results = new float[Cycles];

        DateTime Start = DateTime.Now;

        for (int i = 0; i < Cycles; i++)
        {
            SquareRootFloat(ref Values[i], out Results[i]);
            //Results[i] = (float)Math.Sqrt((float)Values[i]);
            //Results[i] = SquareRootFloat(Values[i]);
        }

        DateTime End = DateTime.Now;

        SqrtTime = End - Start;

        Console.WriteLine("Sqrt was " + SqrtTime.TotalMilliseconds.ToString() + " long");
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}
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1  
To be honest, this seems pretty off-topic, but is interesting anyway! –  Dudeson Apr 3 '13 at 9:03
    

var result = Math.Sqrt((double)value);

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float and double calculate differently no? –  Chris Dec 3 '10 at 21:13
2  
@Chris - The Math.Sqrt method takes a double and returns a double. That is why I casted the parameter as a double. –  Randy Minder Dec 3 '10 at 21:19
    
I see that. But I am talking about floats. Thanks anyway –  Chris Dec 3 '10 at 21:24

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