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In C# it bugs me how there is no "Math.Cos" function that returns a float. A double is the only value you can get back thus forcing you to cast it to a float. Like so:: {float val = (float)Math.Cos(someVal);}

I need to use floats because i'm doing stuff in Direct3D which strictly uses floats. Floats are much more common in the graphics world(as it stands now) because they are 32bit.

Is there any functionality within C# I can use that would simply just process floats like C++ can do??

I do not want to wrap any C++ stuff because this needs to run on XNA & Linux for OpenGL.

NOTE: It would nice to have code that did not cast a double to a float.

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3  
You could overload math.cos() with your own version that just returns a cast version. –  Puppy Dec 3 '10 at 21:36
1  
While Direct3D requires floats, it's still better to work with double until you have to convert as it avoids most (but not all) rounding error problems. –  ChrisF Dec 3 '10 at 21:45
2  
@ChrisF - this really isn't true with games. The rounding is rarely an issue or can be dealt with by clamping, and the perf savings of avoiding Double is significant. –  codekaizen Dec 3 '10 at 21:47
4  
You can't overload Math.Cos since you can't edit the Math class. You just can define a function in your own class. –  CodesInChaos Dec 3 '10 at 22:07
1  
@ChrisF - things are moving to Double, but it's slow. The current gen of GPUs are the first to support it with any reasonable performance. –  codekaizen Dec 3 '10 at 22:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Without going into some in-depth math, you will not be able to write your own accurate Cos function. Here is a suggestion though using extension method:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        float cos = Math.Cos(.25d).ToFloat();

        Console.WriteLine("cos(.25d) = {0}", cos);

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

public static class MathExtensions
{
    public static float ToFloat(this double value)
    {
        return (float)value;
    }
}

This is another way using Func<T, TResult> and creating your own MathF static class:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("cos(.25d) = {0}", MathF.Cos(.25d));
        Console.WriteLine("sin(.25d) = {0}", MathF.Sin(.25d));

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

public static class MathF
{
    public static Func<double, float> Cos = angleR => (float)Math.Cos(angleR);
    public static Func<double, float> Sin = angleR => (float)Math.Sin(angleR);
}

As others have pointed out, the Func delegates will be slower as zezba confirmed in his test code (I didn't know that the delegates would be that much slower). The quickest is the direct cast to float. The middle ground would be simple static method calls in the MathF static class.

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2  
Cos() is not a good name for a convert-to-single-precision extension function. –  Jimmy Dec 3 '10 at 23:07
    
@Jimmy: edited...ToFloat() –  IAbstract Dec 4 '10 at 15:13
4  
Why would you ever write static Func<double, float> Cos = angleR => ... instead of static float Cos(double angleR) { ... }? –  Juliet Dec 5 '10 at 6:29
    
Thankx so much for that great code. I didnt know about either of those methods and will be archiving them for later use. If you know of any way you don't have to cast that would be cool, but I doubt there is without wrapping c++. –  zezba9000 Dec 5 '10 at 9:37
4  
I don't like your implementation of MathF. The idea of defining a MathF class is good. But using delegates here is stupid(yours aren't even readonly fields). Delegates just throw away performance here and make the code harder to understand since for example the documentation will list them as static fields instead of static methods. And I think the functions should take float instead of double. float Cos(float angle){return (float)Math.Cos(angle);} –  CodesInChaos Dec 5 '10 at 9:48

I would create a MathCommonMethods class with methods that would convert all of the frequently used return types to floats in leiu of doubles. This will save you some typing in the long run.

As far as there being an existing function that returns the value as a float, I've not heard of one.

You should also be careful too when casting not to lose precision, if precision is important to your application.

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4  
"Overload" means defining a group of methods with the same name in one class. If you're talking about adding a method to a different class, that's not overloading. It's just defining a method. –  Daniel Earwicker Dec 3 '10 at 21:45
    
I had meant a derived class, to my understanding that's still considered an overload. Good catch though, my initial answer wasn't clear on that. –  Chuck Callebs Dec 3 '10 at 21:51
2  
System.Math is a static class. You can't derive from it. –  Daniel Earwicker Dec 3 '10 at 21:53
    
In that case, overload is not the correct term. :) Thanks again. –  Chuck Callebs Dec 3 '10 at 21:55
3  
@x0n How do you add static methods with extension methods? I think that extension methods can add only instance methods. –  CodesInChaos Dec 3 '10 at 22:08

If you want to avoid casting, you'll need a different implementation. If you are doing cross-platform, you can create a platform abstraction layer where you can put different implementations based on the platform. This will help with performance. If perf isn't an issue (is this ever the case with games), then creating a utility function and performing the casting there is a good solution.

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I had thought about doing that & that is a good idea. But I don't want to over complicate things. Although I think I may try that & see what speed improvements I get from it. Would be nice for PC, Mac & Linux, but would not work on XNA on the XBOX or Phone7. –  zezba9000 Dec 5 '10 at 9:43

Ok so I ran some benchmarks to see what method was the fastest after reading "dboarman" reply. Sadly it seams there is no way to do it without casting using strictly c# & the fastest method is to just cast on spot, so because I care about speed as its mostly for games ill be sticking with the old cast method.

These tests were compiled using the following specs::

C# .NET 4.0
ConsoleApplication - Release - Optimized code - x64
4gb ram, 2.4ghz AMD_X2_DualCore 4600 CPU, running Windows7 Ultimate.

Code:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    //Start
    Console.Write("Hit Enter to Start\n");
    Console.ReadLine();
    long num = 100;
    long mil = 0;
    float val = 0.01f;
    Stopwatch startTime = new Stopwatch();

    //Run
    for(long i = 0; i != num; ++i)
    {
        startTime.Restart();
        for(uint i2 = 0; i2 != 1000000; ++i2) val = (float)System.Math.Cos(val);// 48 Milliseconds
        //for(uint i2 = 0; i2 != 1000000; ++i2) val = System.Math.Cos(val).ToFloat();// 53 Milliseconds
        //for(uint i2 = 0; i2 != 1000000; ++i2) val = MathF2.Cos(val);// 59 Milliseconds
        //for(uint i2 = 0; i2 != 1000000; ++i2) val = MathF.Cos(val);// 63 Milliseconds
        startTime.Stop();
        mil += startTime.ElapsedMilliseconds;
    }

    //End
    mil /= num;

    //Print
    Console.Write("Milliseconds = "+mil.ToString());
    Console.ReadLine();
}

Here is the base math code for the tests::

public static class MathF
{
    public static Func<double, float> Cos = angleR => (float)System.Math.Cos(angleR);
    public static Func<double, float> Sin = angleR => (float)System.Math.Sin(angleR);
}

public static class MathF2
{
    public static float Cos(float pValue) {return (float)System.Math.Cos(pValue);}
}

public static class MathExtensions
{
    public static float ToFloat(this double value)
    {
        return (float)value;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
so if I read your test code correctly, time to complete 1 million casts with the standard cast method is 48ms? Nice job on the tests. I honestly didn't realize how much slower the Func delegates would be. –  IAbstract Dec 5 '10 at 15:21
    
Yes you are correct, 1 million casts would complete in 48ms. I repeat the test 100 times then get the average & print the result. –  zezba9000 Dec 5 '10 at 19:58

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