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I need a way to check if a string contains only alphabetic characters. As I need the functionality several times in my program, I thought it a good idea to put it into a function.

Here's my implementation:

int sisalpha(const char *s) {
    int result = 1;

    while (s++ != '\0') {
        result = isalpha(*s); // uses isalpha of <ctype.h>

        if (result == 0) {
            return result;
        }
    }

    return result;
}

What could I improve in here? Would it be beneficial to also pass in some sort of size to avoid bufferoverflows and allow checking of 'substrings'?

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5  
while(*s++) or while(*s++ != '\0') is you you insist on needless verbosity. –  Chris Becke Dec 3 '10 at 21:54
2  
I find, practically, that isalpha from <ctype.h> is useless as its idea of alpha is never 100% congruent with whatever spec i'm implementing. e.g. depending on the current locale, it can easily decide that characters like 'å' are alpha. or perhaps, not. If you want only ascii alpha... roll your own valid character test. –  Chris Becke Dec 3 '10 at 21:58
2  
is it intentional that empty strings are alpha, and the first character is skipped?: "" is alpha, "a" is not, "1a" is alpha. –  Chris Becke Dec 3 '10 at 22:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use strspn.

Make the set of character to check for, the alphabet in upper and lower case. If the value returned by strspn is the same as the strlen, then it is all alphabetic.

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You could shorten it by not needlessly storing the result. I generally consider succinct code to be an improvement:

int sisalpha(const char *s) {
    while (*s++ != '\0')
        if (!isalpha(*s))
            return 0;
    return 1;
}

I believe this is failing to check the first character in the string though. You could make it shorter still by moving the isalpha test into the while condition, which also insures the first character is checked:

int sisalpha(const char *s) {
    while (isalpha(*s))
      ++s;

    return *s == '\0';
}
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@meagar: All of those variations are skipping a check of the first character. Since the OP's code has a bug which prevents much from working, it seems reasonable to use the function name as a specification. –  wallyk Dec 3 '10 at 21:59
2  
the second function increases s in the while if *s=='\0', and then checks *s again, which does not point to the '\0' any more. –  Wimmel Dec 3 '10 at 22:01
3  
This code is wrong. In fact, it is a very common mistake in functions like this to increment the pointer inside the while condition. That's almost always wrong, you could call it an antipattern in fact. Increment the pointer in the body of the loop after performing whatever calculation characterizes the algorithm you are implementing. I am giving my +1 to Wimmel's correct answer. –  Bill Forster Dec 3 '10 at 22:21
2  
@Antal. Because in the while condition you are testing whether you have reached the end (of the string). If you haven't reached the end, you are pointing at valid data. So process the valid data, and then (and only then), increment the pointer past the data you've just processed. Making this increment operation the very last thing in the body of the while loop is natural and correct, since you then naturally loop around to see if you have now reached the end of the data. –  Bill Forster Dec 3 '10 at 22:32
3  
@Antal: one bug (in the second code snippet) is that if a string is composed entirely of alpha characters the while loop will complete when isalpha() has acted on the '\0' character. However, it will have also incremented the s pointer past the '\0' character, so the return statement will deference an invalid pointer value. This bug also causes the function to return an incorrect result if the last character in the string fails the isalpha() test. –  Michael Burr Dec 3 '10 at 22:45

I have modified meagar's solution to put the s++ outside the while condition:

int sisalpha(const char *s) {
    while (*s != '\0')
        if (!isalpha(*s++))
            return 0;
    return 1;
}

int sisalpha(const char *s) {
    while (isalpha(*s))
        s++;
    return *s == '\0';
}
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Assuming ascii string and spaces not allowed:

int sisalpha(const char *s) {

        while(*s!='\0')
        {
            if((*s>='A'&&*s<='Z') || (*s>='a'&&*s<='z'))
                s++;
            else
                return 0;
        }
        return 1;
}
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the while statement should be while(*s!='\0') –  Wimmel Dec 3 '10 at 22:13
    
@Wimmel:Yes, corrected typo.Thank you –  Cratylus Dec 3 '10 at 22:14
    
What's the rationale for replacing isalpha() with the more complex conditional? –  Michael Burr Dec 3 '10 at 22:38
while ((*s|32)-'a'<26U) s++;
return !*s;
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Could use a little bit of explanation :-/. –  helpermethod Dec 3 '10 at 23:06
    
|32 converts to lowercase (and clobbers bytes outside the letter range, but can't bring them into the letter range). -'a' yields a value in the range 0-25 for letters. <26U performs an unsigned comparison against 26, so any originally-negative quantity or positive quantity greater than 25 tests false. The while loop loops while the condition (*s being a letter) is true. The return statement returns true if end of string (null terminator) was reached and false if the loop stopped on a letter. –  R.. Dec 4 '10 at 0:08

As other answers have mentioned, you need to make sure that you're checking the first character.

Also, if you consider an empty string to be composed of alpha characters, you should clearly document that (actually you should clearly document what an empty string is either way).

Finally, isalpha() only accepts arguments that can be represented as unsigned char or are equal to EOF. If your routine is compiled on a platform where char is signed, you might be violating that constraint.

Here's a version of sisalpha() that fixes these problems (the empty string returns 1 - I'm not sure if that's what you want or not):

int sisalpha(const char *s) {

    for (; *s != 0; ++s) {
        unsigned char c = *s;

        if (!isalpha(c)) return 0;
    }

    return 1;
}
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