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I'd like to take data of the form

before = data.frame(attr = c(1,30,4,6), type=c('foo_and_bar','foo_and_bar_2'))
  attr          type
1    1   foo_and_bar
2   30 foo_and_bar_2
3    4   foo_and_bar
4    6 foo_and_bar_2

and use split the type column to get something like this:

  attr type_1 type_2
1    1    foo    bar
2   30    foo  bar_2
3    4    foo    bar
4    6    foo  bar_2

I came up with something unbelievably complex involving some form of apply that worked, but I've since misplaced that. It seemed far too complicated to be the best way. I can use strsplit as below, but then unclear how to get that back into 2 columns in the data frame.

> strsplit(as.character(before$type),'_and_')
[[1]]
[1] "foo" "bar"

[[2]]
[1] "foo"   "bar_2"

[[3]]
[1] "foo" "bar"

[[4]]
[1] "foo"   "bar_2"

Thanks for any pointers. I've not quite groked R lists just yet.

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7 Answers

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Use stringr::str_split_fixed

library(stringr)
str_split_fixed(before$type, "_and_", 2)
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3  
Wow, another of your libraries to the rescue. I'd be useless in R w/o plyr. Thanks again! –  jkebinger Dec 4 '10 at 15:56
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Yet another approach: use rbind on out:

before <- data.frame(attr = c(1,30,4,6), type=c('foo_and_bar','foo_and_bar_2'))  
out <- strsplit(as.character(before$type),'_and_') 
do.call(rbind, out)

     [,1]  [,2]   
[1,] "foo" "bar"  
[2,] "foo" "bar_2"
[3,] "foo" "bar"  
[4,] "foo" "bar_2"

And to combine:

data.frame(before$attr, do.call(rbind, out))
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Thanks, that's a good tip for working with lists like this –  jkebinger Dec 4 '10 at 15:57
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Notice that sapply with "[" can be used to extract either the first or second items in those lists so:

before$type_1 < sapply(strsplit(as.character(before$type),'_and_'), "[", 1)
before$type_2 < sapply(strsplit(as.character(before$type),'_and_'), "[", 2)
before$type <- NULL

And here's a gsub method:

before$type_1 <- gsub("_and_.+$", "", before$type)
before$type_2 <- gsub("^.+_and_", "", before$type)
before$type <- NULL
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1  
That's a great tip about the '[' method, thanks I will keep that in my back pocket for the future –  jkebinger Dec 4 '10 at 15:58
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here is a one liner along the same lines as aniko's solution, but using hadley's stringr package:

do.call(rbind, str_split(before$type, '_and_'))
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this also works with strsplit from the base package –  schultem Mar 7 '13 at 9:46
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An easy way is to use sapply() and the [ function:

before <- data.frame(attr = c(1,30,4,6), type=c('foo_and_bar','foo_and_bar_2'))
out <- strsplit(as.character(before$type),'_and_')

For example:

> data.frame(t(sapply(out, `[`)))
   X1    X2
1 foo   bar
2 foo bar_2
3 foo   bar
4 foo bar_2

sapply()'s result is a matrix and needs transposing and casting back to a data frame. It is then some simple manipulations that yield the result you wanted:

after <- with(before, data.frame(attr = attr))
after <- cbind(after, data.frame(t(sapply(out, `[`))))
names(after)[2:3] <- paste("type", 1:2, sep = "_")

At this point, after is what you wanted

> after
  attr type_1 type_2
1    1    foo    bar
2   30    foo  bar_2
3    4    foo    bar
4    6    foo  bar_2
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Another approach if you want to stick with strsplit() is to use the unlist() command. Here's a solution along those lines.

tmp <- matrix(unlist(strsplit(as.character(before$type), '_and_')), ncol=2,
   byrow=TRUE)
after <- cbind(before$attr, as.data.frame(tmp))
names(after) <- c("attr", "type_1", "type_2")
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Another option is to use the new tidyr package.

library(dplyr)
library(tidyr)

before <- data.frame(
  attr = c(1, 30 ,4 ,6 ), 
  type = c('foo_and_bar', 'foo_and_bar_2')
)

before %>%
  separate(type, c("foo", "bar"), "_and_")

##   attr foo   bar
## 1    1 foo   bar
## 2   30 foo bar_2
## 3    4 foo   bar
## 4    6 foo bar_2
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