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I want a function with this interface.

func<Type1,CompileOption>( Type2 value)
//or
func<Type1>( Type2 value)

The first compile-time parameter is a type. It is require in every function call.
The second compile time parameter is optional. It is used to modify the behavior of func.
The function itself is templated on the regular parameter's type (Type2).

Can an interface like this be built?

If it cannot is there a way to get similar behavior? eg something that acts like a templated function that takes two compile-time parameters, where the second is optional?

The naive approach doesn't work.

// invalid syntax
template< typename Type1, typename CompileOption = Default, typename Type2>
void func( Type2 t2 );

// Does the wrong thing.
// CompileOption Parameter now change Type2.
template< typename Type1, typename Type2, typename CompileOption = Default>
void func( Type2 t2 );

//This kinda expresses what I'm looking for
template<typename Type2>
template<typename Type1, typename Optional = Default >
void func( Type2 t2 );
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1  
The first option is not invalid syntax. Assuming you use a C++0x compiler (since you seem to be allowed to use default template arguments in function templates), you can also use default arguments for non-trailing template parameters. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 4 '10 at 18:41

3 Answers 3

Do you mean something like this?

template<typename Type1, typename Type2, typename Option>
void foo (Type2 arg)
{
    ... code ...
}

template<typename Type1, typename Type2>
void foo (Type2 arg)
{
    foo<Type1, Type2, DefaultOption>(arg);
}

Edit: The above snippet works, but has the drawback that Type2 needs to be explicitely specified in the calls.

I have to admit that I can't think of a good full-template solution for this; the closest I could get was using empty method arguments:

struct DefaultOption { ... } DEFAULT;
struct OtherOption { ... } OTHER;

template<typename Type1, typename Type2, typename Option>
void foo (Type2 arg, Option)
{
    ... code ...
}

template<typename Type1, typename Type2>
void foo (Type2 arg)
{
    foo<Type1, Type2>(arg, DEFAULT);
}

This allows calls in the form

foo<std::string>(1, DEFAULT);
foo<std::string>(1.0, OTHER);
foo<std::string>("Hello");

I'm curious as to what the real answer to this puzzle is.

share|improve this answer
    
Close to what I want but not quite. It want to be able to call foo like this: foo<int,Fast_t>(42), or foo<int>(42.f). –  deft_code Dec 4 '10 at 0:58
    
Indeed. I edited my answer accordingly, but sadly it's still not quite what you have in mind. –  Lars Dec 4 '10 at 1:24
3  
Can't you switch the order of template arguments? template <class Type1, class Option, class Type2>? –  UncleBens Dec 4 '10 at 10:03
    
duh That works! Write it up as an answer, so you can get credit for it. –  Lars Dec 5 '10 at 0:52

You could always try

template<typename Type1, typename Optional = Default >
struct A
{
    template<typename Type2>
    void func( Type2 t2 ) {
        // function body
    }
};

Maybe this is what you need.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I over thought the problem and confused everyone else as well. It's not possible to write one function unless C++0x extensions are used. However it's quite straight forward to write it with two overloaded functions.

template< typename Type1, typename Option, typename Type2 >
void func( Type2 t2 )
{ /* ... */ }

template< typename Type1, typename Type2 >
void func( Type2 t2 )
{ func<Type1,Default,Type2>(t2); }

func<int,fast_t>(20.f);
func<float>(30); // uses Default as Option
func<float,Default>(30); //exact same call as above.
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