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My application is successfully consuming JSON from the Twitter search API. However, I'm confused as to how I should process the content. Each Tweet JSON object has a "text" property, so I'd assumed that it should be treated as such. However, I'm seeing a lot of ", &amp, and other nonsense in the content.

Is the Twitter API just bad and is erroneously encoding text content as through it's XML, or are consumers of the Twitter API supposed to somehow process the Tweet text as something other than plain text? I realize there's a markup convention, such as @username indicating communication with other Twitter users and http:// indicating a link. Are we also supposed to expect XML or HTML entites? Obviously, I don't want to just blindly insert the Tweet text as HTML.

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the text field returns text not html neither xml, but in the text it uses the special html characters for things like " tjat are quotation marks (cause it can not include them in the json without making a mess) it also adds special characters which are from foreign languages like "2011\u5e746\u6708\u767a\u", so don't be suprissed to find this things. Just get to know the most common marquers so you can replace them when you want to do something with the text.

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Thanks for your answer. Do you know if their special encoding is documented anywhere? I'd expect the \u#### stuff since that's part of the JSON standard, but I'm not sure which specific HTML entities I'm supposed to look for (double-quotes are supposed to be escaped with a backslash, and there's no reason why & would need to be escaped). –  Jacob Dec 6 '10 at 18:18

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