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Can anyone beat the performance of my integer to std::string code, linked below?

There are already several questions that explain how to convert an integer into a std::string in C++, such as this one, but none of the solutions provided are efficient.

Here is compile-ready code for some common methods to compete against:

Contrary to popular belief, boost::lexical_cast has its own implementation (white paper) and does not use stringstream and numeric insertion operators. I'd really like to see its performance compared, because this other question suggests that it's miserable.

And my own contribution, which is competitive on desktop computers, and demonstrates an approach that runs at full speed on embedded systems as well, unlike algorithms dependent on integer modulo:

If you want to use that code, I'll make it available under a simplified BSD license (commercial use allowed, attribution required). Just ask.

Finally, the function ltoa is non-standard but widely available.

I'll post my performance measurements as an answer shortly.

Rules for algorithms

  • Provide code for a conversion of at least 32-bit signed and unsigned integers into decimal.
  • Produce output as a std::string.
  • No tricks that are incompatible with threading and signals (for example, static buffers).
  • You may assume an ASCII character set.
  • Make sure to test your code on INT_MIN on a two's complement machine where the absolute value is not representable.
  • Ideally, the output should be character-for-character identical with the canonical C++ version using stringstream, http://ideone.com/jh3Sa, but anything that is clearly understandable as the correct number is ok, too.
  • NEW: Although you can use whatever compiler and optimizer options (except completely disabled) you want for the comparison, the code needs to also compile and give correct results under at least VC++ 2010 and g++.

Hoped-for Discussion

Besides better algorithms, I'd also like to get some benchmarks on several different platforms and compilers (let's use MB/s throughput as our standard unit of measure). I believe that the code for my algorithm (I know the sprintf benchmark takes some shortcuts -- now fixed) is well-defined behavior by the standard, at least under the ASCII assumption, but if you see any undefined behavior or inputs for which the output is invalid, please point that out.

Conclusions:

Different algorithms perform for g++ and VC2010, likely due to the different implementations of std::string on each. VC2010 clearly does a better job with NRVO, getting rid of return-by-value helped only on gcc.

Code was found that outperforms sprintf by an order of magnitude. ostringstream falls behind by a factor of 50 and more.

The winner of the challenge is user434507 who produces code that runs 350% of the speed of my own on gcc. Further entries are closed due to the whims of the SO community.

The current (final?) speed champions are:

share|improve this question
3  
I think this "Question" better fits in here programmers.stackexchange.com –  Incubbus Dec 4 '10 at 1:23
3  
Your problem is underspecified, as it doesn't explain how the result string should look like. Most likely, always returning the empty string would not be considered acceptable, but is conforming as the specification stands. –  Martin v. Löwis Dec 4 '10 at 1:25
33  
I think this is an acceptable question for StackOverflow. –  James McNellis Dec 4 '10 at 1:25
5  
I voted to re-open this question, there's no reason for it to be closed. –  Puppy Dec 4 '10 at 22:03
2  
@nhahtdh: I have some but not all of the code kept locally, and I'm not sure how it compares version-wise to the code linked from this question and answers. The ideone site states that code snippets are kept on the site "forever". I've just e-mailed the ideone team to see if these were removed by mistake and can perhaps be gotten back. –  Ben Voigt Feb 1 '14 at 20:13

11 Answers 11

up vote 22 down vote accepted
#include <string>

const char digit_pairs[201] = {
  "00010203040506070809"
  "10111213141516171819"
  "20212223242526272829"
  "30313233343536373839"
  "40414243444546474849"
  "50515253545556575859"
  "60616263646566676869"
  "70717273747576777879"
  "80818283848586878889"
  "90919293949596979899"
};


std::string& itostr(int n, std::string& s)
{
    if(n==0)
    {
        s="0";
        return s;
    }

    int sign = -(n<0);
    unsigned int val = (n^sign)-sign;

    int size;
    if(val>=10000)
    {
        if(val>=10000000)
        {
            if(val>=1000000000)
                size=10;
            else if(val>=100000000)
                size=9;
            else 
                size=8;
        }
        else
        {
            if(val>=1000000)
                size=7;
            else if(val>=100000)
                size=6;
            else
                size=5;
        }
    }
    else 
    {
        if(val>=100)
        {
            if(val>=1000)
                size=4;
            else
                size=3;
        }
        else
        {
            if(val>=10)
                size=2;
            else
                size=1;
        }
    }
    size -= sign;
    s.resize(size);
    char* c = &s[0];
    if(sign)
        *c='-';

    c += size-1;
    while(val>=100)
    {
       int pos = val % 100;
       val /= 100;
       *(short*)(c-1)=*(short*)(digit_pairs+2*pos); 
       c-=2;
    }
    while(val>0)
    {
        *c--='0' + (val % 10);
        val /= 10;
    }
    return s;
}

std::string& itostr(unsigned val, std::string& s)
{
    if(val==0)
    {
        s="0";
        return s;
    }

    int size;
    if(val>=10000)
    {
        if(val>=10000000)
        {
            if(val>=1000000000)
                size=10;
            else if(val>=100000000)
                size=9;
            else 
                size=8;
        }
        else
        {
            if(val>=1000000)
                size=7;
            else if(val>=100000)
                size=6;
            else
                size=5;
        }
    }
    else 
    {
        if(val>=100)
        {
            if(val>=1000)
                size=4;
            else
                size=3;
        }
        else
        {
            if(val>=10)
                size=2;
            else
                size=1;
        }
    }

    s.resize(size);
    char* c = &s[size-1];
    while(val>=100)
    {
       int pos = val % 100;
       val /= 100;
       *(short*)(c-1)=*(short*)(digit_pairs+2*pos); 
       c-=2;
    }
    while(val>0)
    {
        *c--='0' + (val % 10);
        val /= 10;
    }
    return s;
}

This will blow up on systems that disallow unaligned memory accesses (in which case, the first unaligned assignment via *(short*) would cause a segfault), but should work very nicely otherwise.

One important thing to do is to minimize the use of std::string. (Ironic, I know.) In Visual Studio, for example, most calls to methods of std::string are not inlined, even if you specify /Ob2 in compiler options. So even something as trivial as a call to std::string::clear(), which you might expect to be very fast, can take 100 clockticks when linking CRT as a static library, and as much as 300 clockticks when linking as a DLL.

For the same reason, returning by reference is better because it avoids an assignment, a constructor and a destructor.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your attempt. On ideone (ideone.com/BCp5r), it scores 18.5 MB/s, about half the speed of sprintf. And with VC++ 2010, it gets about 50 MB/s, about twice the speed of sprintf. –  Ben Voigt Dec 4 '10 at 2:19
    
MB/s is a strange metric, especially seeing how you don't remove trailing whitespaces from the string in your implementations. My updated code runs faster than your implementation with x64 VC++ 2005 on Core i7 920 (16.2M ops/s vs. 14.8M ops/s), _ltoa does 8.5M ops/s and sprintf() does 3.85M ops/s. –  user434507 Dec 4 '10 at 2:40
    
Your code doesn't properly resize the string, mine does (see lines 81, 198, and 290). I took some shortcuts in the sprintf implementation, I already mentioned that in my question, but I believe the code-to-beat gives exactly the same result as stringstream. –  Ben Voigt Dec 4 '10 at 2:57
    
I've fixed the sprintf wrapper as well, to avoid confusion. –  Ben Voigt Dec 4 '10 at 3:12
    
BTW, your improved version (ideone.com/GLAbS) gets 41.7 MB/s on ideone, and right around 120 MB/s on VC++ 2010 32-bit. –  Ben Voigt Dec 4 '10 at 3:27

Ah, awesome challenge by the way... I've had a lot of fun with this.

I have two algorithms to submit (code is at the bottom if you feel like skipping to it). In my comparisons I require that the function return a string and that it can handle int and unsigned int. Comparing things that don't construct a string to those that do doesn't really make sense.

The first one is a fun implementation that doesn't use any precomputed lookup tables or explicit division/modulo. This one is competitive with the others with gcc and with all but Timo's on msvc (for a good reason that I explain below). The second algorithm is my actual submission for highest performance. In my tests it beats all the others on both gcc and msvc.

I think I know why some of the results on MSVC are very good. std::string has two relevant constructors std::string(char* str, size_t n)
and
std::string(ForwardIterator b, ForwardIterator e)
gcc does the same thing for both of them... that is it uses the second to implement the first. The first constructor can be implemented significantly more efficiently than that and MSVC does so. The side benefit of this is that in some cases (like my fast code and Timo's code) the string constructor can be inlined. In fact, just switching between these constructors in MSVC is almost a 2x difference for my code.

My performance testing results:

Code Sources:

- Voigt
- Timo
- ergosys
- user434507
- user-voigt-timo
- hopman-fun
- hopman-fast

gcc 4.4.5 -O2 on Ubuntu 10.10 64-bit, Core i5

hopman_fun: 124.688  MB/sec --- 8.020 s
hopman_fast: 137.552  MB/sec --- 7.270 s
voigt: 120.192  MB/sec --- 8.320 s
user_voigt_timo: 97.9432  MB/sec --- 10.210 s
timo: 120.482  MB/sec --- 8.300 s
user: 97.7517  MB/sec --- 10.230 s
ergosys: 101.42  MB/sec --- 9.860 s

MSVC 2010 64-bit /Ox on Windows 7 64-bit, Core i5

hopman_fun: 127  MB/sec --- 7.874 s
hopman_fast: 259  MB/sec --- 3.861 s
voigt: 221.435  MB/sec --- 4.516 s
user_voigt_timo: 195.695  MB/sec --- 5.110 s
timo: 253.165  MB/sec --- 3.950 s
user: 212.63  MB/sec --- 4.703 s
ergosys: 78.0518  MB/sec --- 12.812 s

Here are some results and a testing/timing framework on ideone
http://ideone.com/XZRqp
Note that ideone is a 32-bit environment. Both of my algorithms suffer from that, but hopman_fast is at least still competetive.

Note that for those the two or so that don't construct a string I added the following function template:

template <typename T>
std::string itostr(T t) {
    std::string ret;
    itostr(t, ret);
    return ret;
}

Now for my code...first the fun one:

    // hopman_fun

template <typename T> 
T reduce2(T v) {
    T k = ((v * 410) >> 12) & 0x000F000F000F000Full;
    return (((v - k * 10) << 8) + k);
}

template <typename T>
T reduce4(T v) {
    T k = ((v * 10486) >> 20) & 0xFF000000FFull;
    return reduce2(((v - k * 100) << 16) + (k));
}

typedef unsigned long long ull;
inline ull reduce8(ull v) {
    ull k = ((v * 3518437209u) >> 45);
    return reduce4(((v - k * 10000) << 32) + (k));
}

template <typename T>
std::string itostr(T o) {
    union {
        char str[16];
        unsigned short u2[8];
        unsigned u4[4];
        unsigned long long u8[2];
    };

    unsigned v = o < 0 ? ~o + 1 : o;

    u8[0] = (ull(v) * 3518437209u) >> 45;
    u8[0] = (u8[0] * 28147497672ull);
    u8[1] = v - u2[3] * 100000000;

    u8[1] = reduce8(u8[1]);
    char* f;
    if (u2[3]) {
        u2[3] = reduce2(u2[3]);
        f = str + 6;
    } else {
        unsigned short* k = u4[2] ? u2 + 4 : u2 + 6;
        f = *k ? (char*)k : (char*)(k + 1);
    }
    if (!*f) f++;

    u4[1] |= 0x30303030;
    u4[2] |= 0x30303030;
    u4[3] |= 0x30303030;
    if (o < 0) *--f = '-';
    return std::string(f, (str + 16) - f);
}

And then the fast one:

    // hopman_fast

struct itostr_helper {
    static unsigned out[10000];

    itostr_helper() {
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++) {
            unsigned v = i;
            char * o = (char*)(out + i);
            o[3] = v % 10 + '0';
            o[2] = (v % 100) / 10 + '0';
            o[1] = (v % 1000) / 100 + '0';
            o[0] = (v % 10000) / 1000;
            if (o[0]) o[0] |= 0x30;
            else if (o[1] != '0') o[0] |= 0x20;
            else if (o[2] != '0') o[0] |= 0x10;
            else o[0] |= 0x00;
        }
    }
};
unsigned itostr_helper::out[10000];

itostr_helper hlp_init;

template <typename T>
std::string itostr(T o) {
    typedef itostr_helper hlp;

    unsigned blocks[3], *b = blocks + 2;
    blocks[0] = o < 0 ? ~o + 1 : o;
    blocks[2] = blocks[0] % 10000; blocks[0] /= 10000;
    blocks[2] = hlp::out[blocks[2]];

    if (blocks[0]) {
        blocks[1] = blocks[0] % 10000; blocks[0] /= 10000;
        blocks[1] = hlp::out[blocks[1]];
        blocks[2] |= 0x30303030;
        b--;
    }

    if (blocks[0]) {
        blocks[0] = hlp::out[blocks[0] % 10000];
        blocks[1] |= 0x30303030;
        b--;
    }

    char* f = ((char*)b);
    f += 3 - (*f >> 4);

    char* str = (char*)blocks;
    if (o < 0) *--f = '-';
    return std::string(f, (str + 12) - f);
}
share|improve this answer
    
For those that are interested in how hopman-fun works but don't feel like puzzling it out, I created a commented version at ideone.com/rnDxk –  Chris Hopman Dec 6 '10 at 9:18
    
I don't understand how the first one works even with the comments. :D The fast one is really nice, though it has its price in memory usage. But I guess 40kB is still acceptable. I actually modified my own code to also use 4 character groups, and got similar speed. ideone.com/KbTFe –  Timo Dec 6 '10 at 17:29

Benchmark data for the code provided in the question:

On ideone (gcc 4.3.4):

Core i7, Windows 7 64-bit, 8 GB RAM, Visual C++ 2010 32-bit:

cl /Ox /EHsc

  • stringstreams: 3.39 MB/s, 3.67 MB/s
  • sprintf: 16.8 MB/s, 16.2 MB/s
  • mine: 194 MB/s, 207 MB/s (with PGO enabled: 250 MB/s)

Core i7, Windows 7 64-bit, 8 GB RAM, Visual C++ 2010 64-bit:

cl /Ox /EHsc

  • stringstreams: 4.42 MB/s, 4.92 MB/s
  • sprintf: 21.0 MB/s, 20.8 MB/s
  • mine: 238 MB/s, 228 MB/s

Core i7, Windows 7 64-bit, 8 GB RAM, cygwin gcc 4.3.4:

g++ -O3

  • stringstreams: 2.19 MB/s, 2.17 MB/s
  • sprintf: 13.1 MB/s, 13.4 MB/s
  • mine: 30.0 MB/s, 30.2 MB/s

edit: I was gonna add my own answer, but the question was was closed so I'm adding it here. :) I wrote my own algorithm and managed to get a decent improvement over Ben's code, though I only tested it in MSVC 2010. I also made a benchmark of all the implementations presented so far, using the same testing setup that was in Ben's original code. -- Timo

Intel Q9450, Win XP 32bit, MSVC 2010

cl /O2 /EHsc

  • stringstream: 2.87 MB/s
  • sprintf: 16.1 MB/s
  • Ben: 202 MB/s
  • Ben (unsigned buffer): 82.0 MB/s
  • ergosys (updated version): 64.2 MB/s
  • user434507: 172 MB/s
  • Timo: 241 MB/s

-

const char digit_pairs[201] = {
  "00010203040506070809"
  "10111213141516171819"
  "20212223242526272829"
  "30313233343536373839"
  "40414243444546474849"
  "50515253545556575859"
  "60616263646566676869"
  "70717273747576777879"
  "80818283848586878889"
  "90919293949596979899"
};

static const int BUFFER_SIZE = 11;

std::string itostr(int val)
{
  char buf[BUFFER_SIZE];
  char *it = &buf[BUFFER_SIZE-2];

  if(val>=0) {
    int div = val/100;
    while(div) {
      memcpy(it,&digit_pairs[2*(val-div*100)],2);
      val = div;
      it-=2;
      div = val/100;
    }
    memcpy(it,&digit_pairs[2*val],2);
    if(val<10)
      it++;
  } else {
    int div = val/100;
    while(div) {
      memcpy(it,&digit_pairs[-2*(val-div*100)],2);
      val = div;
      it-=2;
      div = val/100;
    }
    memcpy(it,&digit_pairs[-2*val],2);
    if(val<=-10)
      it--;
    *it = '-';
  }

  return std::string(it,&buf[BUFFER_SIZE]-it);
}

std::string itostr(unsigned int val)
{
  char buf[BUFFER_SIZE];
  char *it = (char*)&buf[BUFFER_SIZE-2];

  int div = val/100;
  while(div) {
    memcpy(it,&digit_pairs[2*(val-div*100)],2);
    val = div;
    it-=2;
    div = val/100;
  }
  memcpy(it,&digit_pairs[2*val],2);
  if(val<10)
    it++;

  return std::string((char*)it,(char*)&buf[BUFFER_SIZE]-(char*)it);
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for these infos , please explain about gcc speed ! it is very low :( –  ray pixar Dec 4 '10 at 6:02
    
@Behrouz: Indeed. I'm not exactly sure why gcc is so slow, whether it is gcc's version of std::string or poor optimization of the arithmetic code. I shall make another version that doesn't convert to std::string at the end and see whether gcc fares any better. –  Ben Voigt Dec 4 '10 at 6:06
    
@Timo: That's very cool. I didn't really expect the change to an unsigned buffer to help with VC++, which was already quite fast, so it was only applicable to gcc and now user434507 has provided a far better version there. –  Ben Voigt Dec 4 '10 at 20:52

While the info we get here for the algorithms is pretty nice, I think the question is "broken", and I'll explain why I think this:

The question asks to take the performance of int->std::string conversion, and this may be of interest when comparing a commonly available method, such as different stringstream implementations or boost::lexical_cast. It does not, however, make sense when asking for new code, a specialized algorithm, to do this. The reason is that int2string will always involve heap allocation from std::string and if we are trying to squeeze the last out of our conversion algorithm, I do not think it makes sense to mix these measurements up with the heap allocations done by std::string. If I want performant conversion I will always use a fixed size buffer and certainly never allocate anything on the heap!

To sum up, I think the timings should be split:

  • First, fastest (int -> fixed buffer) conversion.
  • Second, timing of (fixed buffer -> std::string) copy.
  • Third, checking how the std::string allocation can directly be used as buffer, to save the copying.

These aspects should not be mixed up in one timing, IMHO.

share|improve this answer
1  
<quote>int2string will always involve heap allocation from std::string</quote> Not with the small-string optimization, which is present in most current implementations of the Standard Library. –  Ben Voigt Dec 6 '10 at 15:56
    
In the end, though, the "output as std::string" requirement was placed there just to make things fair and consistent for all submissions. Algorithms that are faster to make std::string results will also be faster to fill a preallocated buffer. –  Ben Voigt Dec 15 '13 at 16:50
1  
@Ben - good comments. Esp. the sm.str.opt. is something I'll have to remember in the future when judging std.string performance. –  Martin Ba Dec 15 '13 at 18:31

I can't test under VS, but this seems to be faster than your code for g++, about 10%. It could probably be tuned, the decision values chosen are guesses. int only, sorry.

typedef unsigned buf_t; 

static buf_t * reduce(unsigned val, buf_t * stp) {
   unsigned above = val / 10000; 
   if (above != 0) {
      stp = reduce(above, stp); 
      val -= above * 10000; 
   }

   buf_t digit  = val / 1000; 
   *stp++ = digit + '0'; 
   val -= digit * 1000; 

   digit  = val / 100; 
   *stp++ = digit + '0'; 
   val -= digit * 100; 

   digit  = val / 10; 
   *stp++ = digit + '0'; 
   val -= digit * 10; 
   *stp++ = val + '0'; 
   return stp; 
}

std::string itostr(int input) {

   buf_t buf[16]; 


   if(input == INT_MIN) {  
      char buf2[16]; 
      std::sprintf(buf2, "%d", input); 
      return std::string(buf2); 
   }

   // handle negative
   unsigned val = input;
   if(input < 0) 
      val = -input;

   buf[0] = '0'; 
   buf_t* endp = reduce(val, buf+1); 
   *endp = 127; 

   buf_t * stp = buf+1; 
   while (*stp == '0') 
      stp++;
   if (stp == endp)
      stp--; 

   if (input < 0) { 
      stp--; 
      *stp = '-'; 
   }
   return std::string(stp, endp); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
59.2 MB/s on ideone, very nice. ideone.com/UoYpC –  Ben Voigt Dec 4 '10 at 5:39
    
With unsigned variant: ideone.com/pswq9. It seems that changing the buffer type from char to unsigned produces a similar speed improvement in my code, at least on gcc/ideone ideone.com/uthKK. I'll test on VS tomorrow. –  Ben Voigt Dec 4 '10 at 5:53

updated my answer... modp_ufast...

Integer To String Test (Type 1)
[modp_ufast]Numbers: 240000000  Total:   657777786      Time:  1.1633sec        Rate:206308473.0686nums/sec
[sprintf] Numbers: 240000000    Total:   657777786      Time: 24.3629sec        Rate:  9851045.8556nums/sec
[karma]   Numbers: 240000000    Total:   657777786      Time:  5.2389sec        Rate: 45810870.7171nums/sec
[strtk]   Numbers: 240000000    Total:   657777786      Time:  3.3126sec        Rate: 72450283.7492nums/sec
[so   ]   Numbers: 240000000    Total:   657777786      Time:  3.0828sec        Rate: 77852152.8820nums/sec
[timo ]   Numbers: 240000000    Total:   657777786      Time:  4.7349sec        Rate: 50687912.9889nums/sec
[voigt]   Numbers: 240000000    Total:   657777786      Time:  5.1689sec        Rate: 46431985.1142nums/sec
[hopman]  Numbers: 240000000    Total:   657777786      Time:  4.6169sec        Rate: 51982554.6497nums/sec
Press any key to continue . . .

Integer To String Test(Type 2)
[modp_ufast]Numbers: 240000000  Total:   660000000      Time:  0.5072sec        Rate:473162716.4618nums/sec
[sprintf] Numbers: 240000000    Total:   660000000      Time: 22.3483sec        Rate: 10739062.9383nums/sec
[karma]   Numbers: 240000000    Total:   660000000      Time:  4.2471sec        Rate: 56509024.3035nums/sec
[strtk]   Numbers: 240000000    Total:   660000000      Time:  2.1683sec        Rate:110683636.7123nums/sec
[so   ]   Numbers: 240000000    Total:   660000000      Time:  2.7133sec        Rate: 88454602.1423nums/sec
[timo ]   Numbers: 240000000    Total:   660000000      Time:  2.8030sec        Rate: 85623453.3872nums/sec
[voigt]   Numbers: 240000000    Total:   660000000      Time:  3.4019sec        Rate: 70549286.7776nums/sec
[hopman]  Numbers: 240000000    Total:   660000000      Time:  2.7849sec        Rate: 86178023.8743nums/sec
Press any key to continue . . .

Integer To String Test (type 3)
[modp_ufast]Numbers: 240000000  Total:   505625000      Time:  1.6482sec        Rate:145610315.7819nums/sec
[sprintf] Numbers: 240000000    Total:   505625000      Time: 20.7064sec        Rate: 11590618.6109nums/sec
[karma]   Numbers: 240000000    Total:   505625000      Time:  4.3036sec        Rate: 55767734.3570nums/sec
[strtk]   Numbers: 240000000    Total:   505625000      Time:  2.9297sec        Rate: 81919227.9275nums/sec
[so   ]   Numbers: 240000000    Total:   505625000      Time:  3.0278sec        Rate: 79266003.8158nums/sec
[timo ]   Numbers: 240000000    Total:   505625000      Time:  4.0631sec        Rate: 59068204.3266nums/sec
[voigt]   Numbers: 240000000    Total:   505625000      Time:  4.5616sec        Rate: 52613393.0285nums/sec
[hopman]  Numbers: 240000000    Total:   505625000      Time:  4.1248sec        Rate: 58184194.4569nums/sec
Press any key to continue . . .

int ufast_utoa10(unsigned int value, char* str)
{
#define JOIN(N) N "0", N "1", N "2", N "3", N "4", N "5", N "6", N "7", N "8", N "9"
#define JOIN2(N) JOIN(N "0"), JOIN(N "1"), JOIN(N "2"), JOIN(N "3"), JOIN(N "4"), \
                 JOIN(N "5"), JOIN(N "6"), JOIN(N "7"), JOIN(N "8"), JOIN(N "9")
#define JOIN3(N) JOIN2(N "0"), JOIN2(N "1"), JOIN2(N "2"), JOIN2(N "3"), JOIN2(N "4"), \
                 JOIN2(N "5"), JOIN2(N "6"), JOIN2(N "7"), JOIN2(N "8"), JOIN2(N "9")
#define JOIN4    JOIN3("0"), JOIN3("1"), JOIN3("2"), JOIN3("3"), JOIN3("4"), \
                 JOIN3("5"), JOIN3("6"), JOIN3("7"), JOIN3("8"), JOIN3("9")
#define JOIN5(N) JOIN(N), JOIN(N "1"), JOIN(N "2"), JOIN(N "3"), JOIN(N "4"), \
                 JOIN(N "5"), JOIN(N "6"), JOIN(N "7"), JOIN(N "8"), JOIN(N "9")
#define JOIN6    JOIN5(), JOIN5("1"), JOIN5("2"), JOIN5("3"), JOIN5("4"), \
                 JOIN5("5"), JOIN5("6"), JOIN5("7"), JOIN5("8"), JOIN5("9")
#define F(N)     ((N) >= 100 ? 3 : (N) >= 10 ? 2 : 1)
#define F10(N)   F(N),F(N+1),F(N+2),F(N+3),F(N+4),F(N+5),F(N+6),F(N+7),F(N+8),F(N+9)
#define F100(N)  F10(N),F10(N+10),F10(N+20),F10(N+30),F10(N+40),\
                 F10(N+50),F10(N+60),F10(N+70),F10(N+80),F10(N+90)
  static const short offsets[] = { F100(0), F100(100), F100(200), F100(300), F100(400),
                                  F100(500), F100(600), F100(700), F100(800), F100(900)};
  static const char table1[][4] = { JOIN("") }; 
  static const char table2[][4] = { JOIN2("") }; 
  static const char table3[][4] = { JOIN3("") };
  static const char table4[][5] = { JOIN4 }; 
  static const char table5[][4] = { JOIN6 };
#undef JOIN
#undef JOIN2
#undef JOIN3
#undef JOIN4
  char *wstr;
  int remains[2];
  unsigned int v2;
  if (value >= 100000000) {
    v2 = value / 10000;
    remains[0] = value - v2 * 10000;
    value = v2;
    v2 = value / 10000;
    remains[1] = value - v2 * 10000;
    value = v2;
    wstr = str;
    if (value >= 1000) {
      *(__int32 *) wstr = *(__int32 *) table4[value];
      wstr += 4;
    } else {
      *(__int32 *) wstr = *(__int32 *) table5[value];
      wstr += offsets[value];
    }
    *(__int32 *) wstr = *(__int32 *) table4[remains[1]];
    wstr += 4;
    *(__int32 *) wstr = *(__int32 *) table4[remains[0]];
    wstr += 4;
    *wstr = 0;
    return (wstr - str);
  }
  else if (value >= 10000) {
    v2 = value / 10000;
    remains[0] = value - v2 * 10000;
    value = v2;
    wstr = str;
    if (value >= 1000) {
      *(__int32 *) wstr = *(__int32 *) table4[value];
      wstr += 4;
      *(__int32 *) wstr = *(__int32 *) table4[remains[0]];
      wstr += 4;
      *wstr = 0;
      return 8;
    } else {
      *(__int32 *) wstr = *(__int32 *) table5[value];
      wstr += offsets[value];
      *(__int32 *) wstr = *(__int32 *) table4[remains[0]];
      wstr += 4;
      *wstr = 0;
      return (wstr - str);
    }
  }
  else {
    if (value >= 1000) {
      *(__int32 *) str = *(__int32 *) table4[value];
      str += 4;
      *str = 0;
      return 4;
    } else if (value >= 100) {
      *(__int32 *) str = *(__int32 *) table3[value];
      return 3;
    } else if (value >= 10) {
      *(__int16 *) str = *(__int16 *) table2[value];
      str += 2;
      *str = 0;
      return 2;
    } else {
      *(__int16 *) str = *(__int16 *) table1[value];
      return 1;
    }
  }
}

int ufast_itoa10(int value, char* str) {
  if (value < 0) { *(str++) = '-'; 
    return ufast_utoa10(-value, str) + 1; 
  }
  else return ufast_utoa10(value, str);
}


    void ufast_test() {

   print_mode("[modp_ufast]");

   std::string s;
   s.reserve(32);
   std::size_t total_length = 0;
   strtk::util::timer t;
   t.start();

   char buf[128];
   int len;
   for (int i = (-max_i2s / 2); i < (max_i2s / 2); ++i)
   {
      #ifdef enable_test_type01
      s.resize(ufast_itoa10(((i & 1) ? i : -i), const_cast<char*>(s.c_str())));
      total_length += s.size();
      #endif

      #ifdef enable_test_type02
      s.resize(ufast_itoa10(max_i2s + i, const_cast<char*>(s.c_str())));
      total_length += s.size();
      #endif

      #ifdef enable_test_type03
      s.resize(ufast_itoa10(randval[(max_i2s + i) & 1023], const_cast<char*>(s.c_str())));
      total_length += s.size();
      #endif
   }
   t.stop();
   printf("Numbers:%10lu\tTotal:%12lu\tTime:%8.4fsec\tRate:%14.4fnums/sec\n",
          static_cast<unsigned long>(3 * max_i2s),
          static_cast<unsigned long>(total_length),
          t.time(),
          (3.0 * max_i2s) / t.time());
}
share|improve this answer
3  
You never put it into the string. Also I don't know why your results for everyone else's code are so low, your CPU isn't slow. –  Ben Voigt Nov 13 '13 at 3:16
    
modp_ufast has an error, it returns 10 instead of 1000000, 19 instead of 1090000 and etc, till 11000000. –  Denis Zaikin May 27 '14 at 11:30

Here's my little attempt of this fun puzzle.

Instead of using lookup tables, I wanted the compiler to figure it all out. In this case in particular - if you read Hackers' Delight, you see how divide and modulo work -- which makes it very possible to optimize that using SSE/AVX instructions.

Performance benchmark

As for speed, my benchmark here tells me it's 1,5 times faster than the work of Timo (on my Intel Haswell it runs on approximately 1 GB/s).

Things you could consider a cheat

As for the not-making-a-std-string cheat that I use -- of course I took that into consideration for my benchmark of Timo's method as well.

I do use an intrinsic: BSR. If you like, you can also use DeBruijn tables instead - which is one of the things I wrote quite a bit about on my 'fastest 2log' post. Of course, this does have a performance penalty (*well... if you're doing a lot of itoa operations you can actually make a faster BSR but I guess that's not fair...).

The way it works

First thing to do is figure out how much memory we need. This is basically a 10log, which can be implemented in a number of smart ways. See the frequently quoted "Bit Twiddling Hacks" for details.

Next thing to do is to execute the numeric output. I use template recursion for this, so the compiler will figure it out.

I use 'modulo' and 'div' right next to each other. If you read Hacker's Delight, you will notice that the two are closely related, so if you have one answer, you probably have the other as well. I figured the compiler can figure out the details... :-)

The code

Getting the number of digits using a (modified) log10:

struct logarithm
{
    static inline int log2(unsigned int value)
    {
        unsigned long index;
        if (!_BitScanReverse(&index, value))
        {
            return 0;
        }

        // add 1 if x is NOT a power of 2 (to do the ceil)
        return index + (value&(value - 1) ? 1 : 0);
    }

    static inline int numberDigits(unsigned int v)
    {
        static unsigned int const PowersOf10[] =
        { 0, 10, 100, 1000, 10000, 100000, 1000000, 10000000, 100000000, 1000000000 };

        int t = (logarithm::log2(v) + 1) * 1233 >> 12; // (use a lg2 method from above)
        return 1 + t - (v < PowersOf10[t]);
    }
};

Getting yourself the string:

template <int count>
struct WriteHelper
{
    inline static void WriteChar(char* buf, unsigned int value)
    {
        unsigned int div = value / 10;
        unsigned int rem = value % 10;
        buf[count - 1] = rem + '0';

        WriteHelper<count - 1>::WriteChar(buf, div);
    }
};

template <>
struct WriteHelper<1>
{
    inline static void WriteChar(char* buf, unsigned int value) 
    {
        buf[0] = '0' + value;
    }
};

// Boring code that converts a length into a switch.
// TODO: Test if recursion with an 'if' is faster.
static inline void WriteNumber(char* data, int len, unsigned int val) 
{
    switch (len) {
    case 1:
        WriteHelper<1>::WriteChar(data, static_cast<unsigned int>(val));
        break;
    case 2:
        WriteHelper<2>::WriteChar(data, static_cast<unsigned int>(val));
        break;
    case 3:
        WriteHelper<3>::WriteChar(data, static_cast<unsigned int>(val));
        break;
    case 4:
        WriteHelper<4>::WriteChar(data, static_cast<unsigned int>(val));
        break;
    case 5:
        WriteHelper<5>::WriteChar(data, static_cast<unsigned int>(val));
        break;
    case 6:
        WriteHelper<6>::WriteChar(data, static_cast<unsigned int>(val));
        break;
    case 7:
        WriteHelper<7>::WriteChar(data, static_cast<unsigned int>(val));
        break;
    case 8:
        WriteHelper<8>::WriteChar(data, static_cast<unsigned int>(val));
        break;
    case 9:
        WriteHelper<9>::WriteChar(data, static_cast<unsigned int>(val));
        break;
    case 10:
        WriteHelper<10>::WriteChar(data, static_cast<unsigned int>(val));
        break;
    }
}

// The main method you want to call...
static int Write(char* data, int val) 
{
    int len;
    if (val >= 0) 
    {
        len = logarithm::numberDigits(val);
        WriteNumber(data, len, unsigned int(val));
        return len;
    }
    else 
    {
        unsigned int v(-val);
        len = logarithm::numberDigits(v);
        WriteNumber(data+1, len, v);
        data[0] = '-';
        return len + 1;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Interestingly, I recently gave a copy of Hacker's Delight to a coworker. Any particular sections? Of course, note that modulo and div, although both returned from a single divide instruction, will not be obtained that way, because division by a constant is implemented much faster using hardware multiply than divide. –  Ben Voigt Mar 13 at 19:05
    
@BenVoigt actually if you run 'disassemble' on VS2013 you get exactly the code you would expect after reading H's delight. The chapter you're looking for is chapter 10. –  atlaste Mar 13 at 19:07
    
Yes, that's the implementation using hardware multiply I was referring to. –  Ben Voigt Mar 13 at 19:30
    
@BenVoigt Yes of course, that was what I meant. Both modulo and multiply (by constant) use the same magic number, shift (arith and normal). My assumption here was that the compiler is able to figure out it is emitting the same instructions multiple times and optimize that - and since all operations can be vectorized, it might figure that out as well (let's call that a bonus :-). My point with H's delight was that if you know how these operations are compiled (integer multiply, shift), you can make these assumptions. –  atlaste Mar 15 at 9:46

Why is nobody using the div function from stdlib when both, quotient and remainder are needed?
Using Timo's source code, I ended up with something like this:

if(val >= 0)
{
    div_t   d2 = div(val,100);
    while(d2.quot)
    {
        COPYPAIR(it,2 * d2.rem);
        it-=2;
        d2 = div(d2.quot,100);
    }
    COPYPAIR(it,2*d2.rem);
    if(d2.quot<10)
        it++;
}
else
{
    div_t   d2 = div(val,100);
    while(d2.quot)
    {
        COPYPAIR(it,-2 * d2.rem);
        it-=2;
        d2 = div(d2.quot,100);
    }
    COPYPAIR(it,-2*d2.rem);
    if(d2.quot<=-10)
        it--;
    *it = '-';
}

Ok, for unsigned int's, the div function can't be used but unsigned's can be handled separate.
I've defined the COPYPAIR macro as follows to test variations how to copy the 2 characters from the digit_pairs (found no obvious advantage of any of these methods):

#define COPYPAIR0(_p,_i) { memcpy((_p), &digit_pairs[(_i)], 2); }
#define COPYPAIR1(_p,_i) { (_p)[0] = digit_pairs[(_i)]; (_p)[1] = digit_pairs[(_i)+1]; }
#define COPYPAIR2(_p,_i) { unsigned short * d = (unsigned short *)(_p); unsigned short * s = (unsigned short *)&digit_pairs[(_i)]; *d = *s; }

#define COPYPAIR COPYPAIR2
share|improve this answer
1  
It's because this challenge is about speed, not the fewest lines of code. –  Ben Voigt Jan 15 '13 at 13:50
    
PS: And for the people that want to use this in my solution: (1) it's much much slower and (2) because div works on signed integers - which breaks abs(INT32_MIN). –  atlaste Mar 13 at 19:04

Modification to user434507's solution. Modified to use character array instead of C++ string. Runs a bit faster. Also moved the check for 0 lower in the code...as this never happens for my particular case. Move it back if it's more common for your case.

// Int2Str.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//
#include <stdio.h>
#include <iostream>
#include "StopWatch.h"

using namespace std;

const char digit_pairs[201] = {
  "00010203040506070809"
  "10111213141516171819"
  "20212223242526272829"
  "30313233343536373839"
  "40414243444546474849"
  "50515253545556575859"
  "60616263646566676869"
  "70717273747576777879"
  "80818283848586878889"
  "90919293949596979899"
};

void itostr(int n, char* c) {
    int sign = -(n<0);
    unsigned int val = (n^sign)-sign;

    int size;
    if(val>=10000) {
        if(val>=10000000) {
            if(val>=1000000000) {
                size=10;
            }
            else if(val>=100000000) {
                size=9;
            }
            else size=8;
        }
        else {
            if(val>=1000000) {
                size=7;
            }
            else if(val>=100000) {
                size=6;
            }
            else size=5;
        }
    }
    else {
        if(val>=100) {
            if(val>=1000) {
                size=4;
            }
            else size=3;
        }
        else {
            if(val>=10) {
                size=2;
            }
            else if(n==0) {
                c[0]='0';
                c[1] = '\0';
                return;
            }
            else size=1;
        }
    }
    size -= sign;
    if(sign)
    *c='-';

    c += size-1;
    while(val>=100) {
        int pos = val % 100;
        val /= 100;
        *(short*)(c-1)=*(short*)(digit_pairs+2*pos); 
        c-=2;
    }
    while(val>0) {
        *c--='0' + (val % 10);
        val /= 10;
    }
    c[size+1] = '\0';
}

void itostr(unsigned val, char* c)
{
    int size;
    if(val>=10000)
    {
        if(val>=10000000)
        {
            if(val>=1000000000)
                size=10;
            else if(val>=100000000)
                size=9;
            else 
                size=8;
        }
        else
        {
            if(val>=1000000)
                size=7;
            else if(val>=100000)
                size=6;
            else
                size=5;
        }
    }
    else 
    {
        if(val>=100)
        {
            if(val>=1000)
                size=4;
            else
                size=3;
        }
        else
        {
            if(val>=10)
                size=2;
            else if (val==0) {
                c[0]='0';
                c[1] = '\0';
                return;
            }
            else
                size=1;
        }
    }

    c += size-1;
    while(val>=100)
    {
       int pos = val % 100;
       val /= 100;
       *(short*)(c-1)=*(short*)(digit_pairs+2*pos); 
       c-=2;
    }
    while(val>0)
    {
        *c--='0' + (val % 10);
        val /= 10;
    }
    c[size+1] = '\0';
}

void test() {
    bool foundmismatch = false;
    char str[16];
    char compare[16];
    for(int i = -1000000; i < 1000000; i++) {
        int random = rand();
        itostr(random, str);
        itoa(random, compare, 10);
        if(strcmp(str, compare) != 0) {
            cout << "Mismatch found: " << endl;
            cout << "Generated: " << str << endl;
            cout << "Reference: " << compare << endl;
            foundmismatch = true;
        }
    }
    if(!foundmismatch) {
        cout << "No mismatch found!" << endl;
    }
    cin.get();
}

void benchmark() {
    StopWatch stopwatch;
    stopwatch.setup("Timer");
    stopwatch.reset();
    stopwatch.start();
    char str[16];
    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < 2000000; i++) {
        itostr(i, str);
    }
    stopwatch.stop();
    cin.get();
}

int main( int argc, const char* argv[]) {
    benchmark();
}
share|improve this answer

And so the .net community doesn't feel left out, here is a version of user434507's in c# that runs in well less than half the time of int.ToString()...

static class FastToString
{
    struct TwoDigits
    {
        public readonly char First;
        public readonly char Second;

        public TwoDigits(char first, char second)
        {
            First = first;
            Second = second;
        }
    }

    private static readonly TwoDigits[] DigitPairs;

    static FastToString()
    {
        DigitPairs = new TwoDigits[100];
        for (var i=0; i < 100; ++i)
            DigitPairs[i] = new TwoDigits((char)('0' + (i / 10)), (char)+('0' + (i % 10)));
    }

    const int GREATER_VALUE_THAN_MAX_LENGTH_OF_MAX_VALUE_AS_STRING = 30;
    [ThreadStatic] private static char[] __buffer__do_not_use_directly;
    private static char[] Buffer
    {
        get
        {
            var buffer = __buffer__do_not_use_directly;
            if (buffer == null)
            {
                buffer = new char[GREATER_VALUE_THAN_MAX_LENGTH_OF_MAX_VALUE_AS_STRING];
                __buffer__do_not_use_directly = buffer;
            }
            return buffer;
        }
    }

    private static int Int64Length(ulong i)
    {
        if (i < 1000)
        {
            if (i < 10) return 1;
            if (i < 100) return 2;
            return 3;
        }
        else if (i < 1000000)
        { 
            if (i < 10000) return 4;
            if (i < 100000) return 5;
            return 6;
        }
        else if (i < 1000000000)
        {
            if (i < 10000000) return 7;
            if (i < 100000000) return 8;
            return 9;
        }
        else if (i < 1000000000000)
        {
            if (i < 10000000000) return 10;
            if (i < 100000000000) return 11;
            return 12;
        }
        else if (i < 1000000000000000)
        {
            if (i < 10000000000000) return 13;
            if (i < 100000000000000) return 14;
            return 15;
        }
        else if (i < 1000000000000000000)
        {
            if (i < 10000000000000000) return 16;
            if (i < 100000000000000000) return 17;
            return 18;
        }
        else
        {
            if (i < 10000000000000000000) return 19;
            return 20;
        }
    }

    private static int Int32Length(uint i)
    {
        if (i < 1000)
        {
            if (i < 10) return 1;
            if (i < 100) return 2;
            return 3;
        }
        else if (i < 1000000)
        {
            if (i < 10000) return 4;
            if (i < 100000) return 5;
            return 6;
        }
        else if (i < 1000000000)
        {
            if (i < 10000000) return 7;
            if (i < 100000000) return 8;
            return 9;
        }
        return 10;
    }

    private static string UInt32ToString(uint ui, char[] buffer, int pos)
    {
        if (ui == 0)
            return "0";

        var stringLength = pos + Int32Length(ui);
        var currentIdx = stringLength - 1;
        while (currentIdx > pos)
        {
            var next = ui / 100U;
            var index = ui - (next * 100U);
            var values = DigitPairs[index];
            buffer[currentIdx] = values.Second;
            --currentIdx;
            buffer[currentIdx] = values.First;
            --currentIdx;
            ui = next;
        }
        if (currentIdx == pos)
            buffer[currentIdx] = (char)('0' + ui);

        return new string(buffer, 0, stringLength);
    }

    private static string UInt64ToString(ulong ul, char[] buffer, int pos)
    {
        if (ul == 0)
            return "0";

        var stringLength = pos + Int64Length(ul);
        var currentIdx = stringLength-1;
        while (currentIdx > pos)
        {
            var next = ul / 100UL;
            var index = ul - (next * 100UL);
            var values = DigitPairs[index];
            buffer[currentIdx] = values.Second;
            --currentIdx;
            buffer[currentIdx] = values.First;
            --currentIdx;
            ul = next;
        }
        if (currentIdx == pos)
            buffer[currentIdx] = (char)('0' + ul);

        return new string(buffer, 0, stringLength);
    }

    public static string UInt64ToString(ulong ul)
    {
        return UInt64ToString(ul, Buffer, 0);
    }

    public static string Int64ToString(long l)
    {
        var buffer = Buffer;
        if (l < 0)
        {
            buffer[0] = '-';
            return UInt64ToString(1 + (ulong)~l /*to handle long.MinValue*/, buffer, 1);
        }
        return UInt64ToString((ulong)l, buffer, 0);
    }

    public static string UInt32ToString(uint ul)
    {
        return UInt32ToString(ul, Buffer, 0);
    }

    public static string Int32ToString(int l)
    {
        var buffer = Buffer;
        if (l < 0)
        {
            buffer[0] = '-';
            return UInt32ToString(1 + (uint)~l /*to handle int.MinValue*/, buffer, 1);
        }
        return UInt32ToString((uint)l, buffer, 0);
    }

    public static string UInt16ToString(ushort ul)
    {
        return UInt32ToString(ul);
    }

    public static string Int16ToString(short l)
    {
        return Int32ToString(l);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, but belongs in a different question, .NET specific. Feel free to create links between the two questions. –  Ben Voigt Jun 25 '14 at 21:35

I was so impressed by the performance of the code presented here, I had to integrate some of it into my own libraries, and although I'm certain this competition is over and done with, I figured I'd share this anyway.

Mostly this is a hybrid of existing implementations, that makes a couple of minor fixes and additions. Functions have been tested exhaustively and generate output identical to sprintf.

Common support

#define SWAP_(type, a, b) \
        do { type t=(a);(a)=(b);(b)=t; } while (0)
#define ALIGNED_(x, m) \
        (((unsigned long) (x) % (m)) == 0)
#define STATIC_ASSERT_(cond) \
        do { typedef char static_assert_failed[2*!!(cond)-1]; } while (0)

Implementation v1

This version may be slightly slower, but has no dependencies (personally I prefer this version).

static void chreverse_(char* first, char* last)
/* reverse char sequence [first,last). */
{
        for ( --last; first < last; first++, last-- )
           SWAP_(char, *first, *last);
}

static char* itoabase_lower_optimal_10_(int in, char* first)
/* integer to string conversion (base 10 specialization). */
{
        static const char symbol[] =
           "00102030405060708090"
           "01112131415161718191"
           "02122232425262728292"
           "03132333435363738393"
           "04142434445464748494"
           "05152535455565758595"
           "06162636465666768696"
           "07172737475767778797"
           "08182838485868788898"
           "09192939495969798999";

        STATIC_ASSERT_(ALIGNED_(symbol, 2));

        union { char* cp; short* sp; } last = { first };
        unsigned int x = abs(in);

        /* align to word boundary. */
        for ( ; !ALIGNED_(last.cp, 2); x /= 10 )
           *last.cp++ = '0' + (x % 10);
        /* word conversion. */
        for ( ; x >= 10; x /= 100 )
           *last.sp++ = *((short*) symbol + (x % 100));
        /* last digit or input is zero. */
        if (x != 0 || first == last.cp)
           *last.cp++ = '0' + (x % 10);
        /* append sign. */
        if (in < 0)
           *last.cp++ = '-';

        *last.cp = 0;
        chreverse_(first, last.cp);
        return first;
}

Implementation v2

A little faster since it avoids the final swap, but requires more support code (performance relies on availability of built-in bit scan).

#ifdef __GNUC__
extern inline unsigned int msb_u32(uint32_t x)
/* index of most significant bit set [32,1] or zero for no bit set. */
{       return (x != 0) ? 32 - __builtin_clz(x) : 0;
}
#else
unsigned int msb_u32(uint32_t x)
/* index of most significant bit set [32,1] or zero for no bit set. */
{
        static const unsigned int bval[] =
        { 0,1,2,2,3,3,3,3,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4 };

        unsigned int base = 0;
        if (x & (uint32_t) 0xFFFF0000) { base += 32/2; x >>= 32/2; }
        if (x & (uint32_t) 0x0000FF00) { base += 32/4; x >>= 32/4; }
        if (x & (uint32_t) 0x000000F0) { base += 32/8; x >>= 32/8; }
        return base + bval[x];
}
#endif /* __GNUC__ */

unsigned int log2ui(unsigned int x)
/* integer base 2 logrithm.
 * @note log zero is undefined; if @p x is zero returns UINT_MAX.
 */
{       return msb_u32(x) - 1;
}

unsigned int log10ui(unsigned int x)
/* integer base 10 logrithm.
 * @note log zero is undefined; if @p x is zero returns UINT_MAX.
 */
{
        static const unsigned int powertable[] = {
           1, 10, 100, 1000, 10000, 100000, 1000000, 10000000, 100000000,
           1000000000 };

        unsigned int lg_ten = (log2ui(x) + 1) * 1233 >> 12;
        unsigned int adjust = (x < powertable[lg_ten]);
        unsigned int result = lg_ten - adjust;
        return result;
}

static char* itoabase_lower_optimal_10_(int in, char* first)
/* integer to string conversion (base 10 specialization). */
{
        /* @note digits have been swapped (word writes are in reverse
         * order). */
        static const char symbol[] =
           "00010203040506070809"
           "10111213141516171819"
           "20212223242526272829"
           "30313233343536373839"
           "40414243444546474849"
           "50515253545556575859"
           "60616263646566676869"
           "70717273747576777879"
           "80818283848586878889"
           "90919293949596979899";

        STATIC_ASSERT_(ALIGNED_(symbol, 2));

        union { char* cp; short* sp; } last = { first };
        if (in == 0)
         {
           *last.cp++ = '0';
           *last.cp = 0;
         }
        else
         {
           unsigned int sign = (in < 0);
           unsigned int x = abs(in);

           unsigned int count = log10ui(x);
           last.cp += count+sign+1;
           *last.cp = 0;

           /* align to word boundary. */
           for ( ; !ALIGNED_(last.cp, 2); x /= 10 )
              *--last.cp = '0' + (x % 10);
           /* word conversion. */
           for ( ; x >= 10; x /= 100 )
              *--last.sp = *((short*) symbol + (x % 100));
           /* last digit. */
           if (x != 0)
              *--last.cp = '0' + (x % 10);
           /* append sign. */
           if (sign)
              *--last.cp = '-';
         }
        return first;
}

General Private

static char* itoabase_lower_default_(int in, unsigned int base, char* first)
/* integer to string conversion (default). */
{
        static const char symbol[] = "0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";

        char* last = first;
        unsigned int x = in;

        do
         {
           *last++ = symbol[x%base];
           x /= base;
         }
        while ( x != 0 );

        *last = 0;
        chreverse_(first, last);
        return first;
}

static char* itoabase_lower_(int in, unsigned int base, char* out)
/* integer to string conversion (main). */
{
        if (base != 10)
           return itoabase_lower_default_(in, base, out);
        else
           return itoabase_lower_optimal_10_(in, out);
}

General Public

char* itoabase(int in, int base, char* out)
{
        assert(out != NULL);
        assert(2 <= base && base <= 36);
        return itoabase_lower_(in, base, out);
}

const char* itoabin(int in)
{
        static char out[34*2];
        return itoabase(in, 2, out);
}

const char* itoadec(int in)
{
        static char out[12*2];
        return itoabase(in, 10, out);
}

const char* itoahex(int in)
{
        static char out[10*2];
        return itoabase(in, 16, out);
}

Conformance with challenge

Converting these to support unsigned types as well as producing std::string is trivial.

Unsigned types only require removing the call to abs() and the appending of the sign character, since all operations are unsigned internally.

The conversion to std::string could be accomplished by modifying the lower functions to return a string length instead of a pointer, then implemented as follows,

std::string itoadec(int in)
{
        char out[16];
        return std::string(out, out + itoabase_lower_(in, 10, out));
}
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