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0 = 0
1 = 1
...
9 = 9
10 = a
11 = b
...
35 = z
36 = A
37 = B
...
60 = Z
61 = 10
62 = 11
... 
70 = 19
71 = 1a
72 = 1b

I don't know what this is called. Base something?

All I want is a function that can convert the numbers into these, and these back to numbers.

Is there an easy function that can do this?

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closed as off-topic by Qantas 94 Heavy, S.L. Barth, AlexVogel, Ankur, Bakuriu Mar 13 '14 at 10:34

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Looks like base 61. I doubt there are any common libraries that use base 61. – snapshoe Dec 4 '10 at 2:04
    
Base 62 actually. – Kabie Dec 4 '10 at 2:09
2  
This is really hard to read. Please put some newlines in your code block. – robert Dec 4 '10 at 2:10
    
How do you know if it's base 62 or base 61? – TIMEX Dec 4 '10 at 6:06
    
It's 61, not 62. Reading directly from the question... 61 = 10. Also, 9 + 26 + 26 == 61. – snapshoe Dec 4 '10 at 21:01
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You may inherit numbers.Number:

def baseN(base,alphabet='0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ'):
    class _baseN(numbers.Number):
        digits=alphabet[:base]
        def __init__(self,value):
            if isinstance(value,int):
                self.value=value
                if self.value==0:
                    self.string='0'
                else:
                    tmp=[abs(value)]
                    while tmp[0]!=0:
                        tmp[:1]=divmod(tmp[0],base)
                    tmp=[alphabet[i] for i in tmp]
                    tmp[0]='-' if self.value<0 else ''
                    self.string=''.join(tmp)
            elif isinstance(value,str):
                assert(value.isalnum())
                self.string=str(value)
                self.value=0
                for d in value:
                    self.value=self.value*base+self.digits.index(d)
            else:
                self.value=0
                self.string='0'
        def __int__(self):
            return self.value
        def __str__(self):
            return self.string
        def __repr__(self):
            return self.string
        def __add__(self,another):
            return self.__class__(self.value+int(another))
    return None if base>len(alphabet) else _baseN

Found another bug. Change it to a factory function. Now may handle general situation.

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Whoops, made a mistake about turning int to string, fixed now. – Kabie Dec 4 '10 at 5:32
1  
import string; string.digits + string.ascii_lowercase + string.ascii_uppercase – Blue Peppers Dec 4 '10 at 9:18
>>> int("a", 36)
10
>>> int("z", 36)
35
>>> int("10", 36)
36

The other direction is more complicated, but try this ActiveState recipe.

Normally base conversions make no distinction between cases. I'm not sure how to completely extend this to make that distinction, but the recipe should give you a start.

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