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I am attempting to build a relatively complex data structure (for me). My goal is to read words from text documents and index the words and some specific properties into a hash table. The table is constructed from a vector of vectors of structs: (vector < vector > vecName;). This much I have had luck with. Each unique word is hashed into an index location in the vector. The second dimension of the the vector (the vector of structs) stores info about the file being read and where the word is found in the file. For each file that I read, if I find a certain word multiple times, a count is incremented in the struct and a vector of structs with integers stores the info for all the locations that the word is stored in the file.

I have two items I would like assistance with:

  1. I'm curious if anyone has suggestions for a better data structure implementation than my suggestion. Would a class that contains some independent data members instead of this behemoth possibly be more useable?
  2. It appears that I have either a syntax error that is causing a compilation error or I am simply attempting to build a structure that the vector class doesn't support.

Here are the cmpilation errors. All three errors refer to the vector of structs inside a struct:

'class std::vector >' has no member named 'theLoc'
'class std::vector >' has no member named 'theStart'
'class std::vector >' has no member named 'theEnd'

If I tweak the code as EboMike suggests, the original errors go away but I then get:

I get a different error that I can't post becase the editor thinks I'm posting hyperlinks. The summary is: *'Request for member 'push_back' in 'testProps.wordProps::theWordLoc:theLoc, which is of non-class type 'int'*

Here is my code and a link to a diagram (from my blog) of how I see the data structure:

http://iamkevinfrye.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/MicroSearch-Hash-Table-Data-Structure-Diagram.png

#include <vector>
#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct wordLoc
{
    int theLoc;                     // the location of the word in theFile
    int theStart;                   // the beginning of the sentence
    int theEnd;                     // the end of the sentence
};

struct wordProps                    // stores word info to be placed in array
{
    string  theFile;                // stores the file where theWord is found
    int theCount;                   // increments with each occurence of theWord
    vector <wordLoc> theWordLoc;    // stores the wordLoc info for each occurence of theWord
};

int main()
{    
    int Tsize = 20000;

    wordProps testProps;
    testProps.theFile = "test1";
    testProps.theCount = 1;
    testProps.theWordLoc.theLoc.push_back(200);
    testProps.theWordLoc.theStart.push_back(1);
    testProps.theWordLoc.theEnd.push_back(15);

    vector < vector <wordProps> > theWordProps;
    theWordProps.resize(Tsize);

    theWordProps[0].push_back(testProps);

    cout << "index[0] = " << theWordProps[0].front().theFile << endl;
    cout << "index[0] = " << theWordProps[0].front().theCount << endl;
    cout << "index[0] = " << theWordProps[0].front().theWordLoc[0].theLoc << endl;
    cout << "index[0] = " << theWordProps[0].front().theWordLoc[0].theStart << endl;
    cout << "index[0] = " << theWordProps[0].front().theWordLoc[0].theEnd << endl;
    cout << "size of theWordProps[0] = " << theWordProps[0].size();

    cout << endl;
}
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2  
"It appears that I have either a syntax error that is causing a compilation error"... please post the full text of the error message. –  Laurence Gonsalves Dec 4 '10 at 6:48
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't know about design choice of the data structure apart from making it a hasmap but your code is almost correct!

Check out my comments:

int main()
{    
    int Tsize = 20000;

    wordProps testProps;
    testProps.theFile = "test1";
    testProps.theCount = 1;

    // create your wordLoc object
    wordLoc wl;
    wl.theLoc = 200;
    wl.theStart = 1;
    wl.theEnd = 15;

    // put it into the vector
    testProps.theWordLoc.push_back(wl);

    vector < vector <wordProps> > theWordProps;
    theWordProps.resize(Tsize);

    theWordProps[0].push_back(testProps);

    cout << "index[0] = " << theWordProps[0].front().theFile << endl;
    cout << "index[0] = " << theWordProps[0].front().theCount << endl;
    cout << "index[0] = " << theWordProps[0].front().theWordLoc[0].theLoc << endl;
    cout << "index[0] = " << theWordProps[0].front().theWordLoc[0].theStart << endl;
    cout << "index[0] = " << theWordProps[0].front().theWordLoc[0].theEnd << endl;
    cout << "size of theWordProps[0] = " << theWordProps[0].size();

    cout << endl;
}
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Thanks Vic! This makes perfect sense and I was using the same type of logic when passing testProps to theWordProps but it got a little foggy in there and I failed to see the same pattern for passing wl to the wordProps. Thanks for helping with this small vic-tory! :) now I can get some rest! –  fryeguy Dec 4 '10 at 7:32
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The compile error first: You're probably referring to this line:

testProps.theWordLoc.theLoc.push_back(200);
testProps.theWordLoc.theStart.push_back(1);
testProps.theWordLoc.theEnd.push_back(15);

theWordLoc is a vector, so you'll need to treat it as such, for example:

testProps.theWordLoc[0].theLoc = 200;

or, if there's nothing there yet:

wordLoc wordLocData;
worldLocData.theLoc = 200;
worldLocData.theStart = 1;
worldLocData.theEnd = 15;
testProps.theWorldLoc.push_back(worldLocData);

As to your actual question: Is that a viable solution? Yes, it is. However, how much data do you expect to get? And how persistent is it? If the answer is "tons, long", I'd go for a database instead. Have a table for worldLoc, one for wordProps, one for the higher-level vectors, and things are a lot faster and cleaner.

Also, I don't like the top-level vectors. I don't understand the structure you intend to do there (I just glanced at the diagram), but it sounds like you're looking for a hashmap instead.

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I edited the original post with the errors. They are at the lines EboMike suggested.theWordLoc is a vector and I am attempting to use the .push_back method which does not require an index. However, I tried adding the index and received a different set of errors. –  fryeguy Dec 4 '10 at 7:06
    
Thanks for the comment on using a database. Very tempting. Unfortunately for me this is part of a research project on data structures and effectively I am using a database, I'm just building it from scratch... but the point is still well taken. I couldn't agree more. –  fryeguy Dec 4 '10 at 7:21
    
You should really consider it. Sounds like it's really what you should be using. Btw, will edit the answer about the compile error - theLoc is not a vector, so you can't say "push_back" on it. –  EboMike Dec 4 '10 at 7:35
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In testProps.theWordLoc.theLoc you are referring to the theLoc member of a vector theWordLoc. This is simply unacceptable. You should use something like testProps.theWordLoc[0].theLoc.

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so are you suggesting that in this context the .push_back method of the vector class is unacceptable and I am required to provide an index to access a member of theWordLoc? –  fryeguy Dec 4 '10 at 7:18
    
@fryeguy: if you wish to push_back, use this: testProps.theWordLoc.push_back({instance of wordLoc}). theWordLoc is a vector. –  Ryan Li Dec 4 '10 at 7:24
    
@fryeguy you have the logic the wrong way around. Your code says testProps.theWordLoc.theLoc.push_back. This means "go into testProps, then find the theWordLoc member of that, then find the theLoc member of that, then find the push_back member of that ". This code tries to find theLoc in theWordLoc, but theWordLoc is a std::vector - it does not have a theLoc. What does have a theLoc is the thing that you want to push_back onto it. You want to push_back onto theWordLoc, so your code should look like theWordLoc.push_back( something here ). –  Karl Knechtel Dec 4 '10 at 8:58
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Maybe for the data structure a multimap could be your friend here replacing the top lvl vector of vectors.

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/stl/multimap/

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can I use a hash function to store values in a multimap? I'm looking for creating a table that is as class to Big-O of 1 as possible. –  fryeguy Dec 4 '10 at 7:26
    
From the link i posted you can see that when using the template for multimap you can give a Comparer as param which can contain your hash function if I'm not completely missing something. Inserting should be something like O(log(n)) and lookup with hash O(1). –  mPopp Dec 4 '10 at 8:03
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