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I have this query for getting data through Entity Framework, which works today. Thing is, i want to create the query dynamically, i.e build it up in blocks, but i can't figure out how exactly to do it. I believe if i can somehow save one of the values that i retrieve in the beginning i can do it, but now i retrieve it twice (probably a bit slow as well? Unless the compiler fixes it before quering). Makes sense? Here is the LINQ:

from d in db.trains
where d.cancelled
&& d.station == toStation
&& d.date >= fromDate.Date
&& d.date <= toDate.Date
&& (from k in db.trains
    where 
    k.date == d.date
    && k.trainId == d.trainId
    && k.stationId == fromStation
    && k.position <= d.position
    select k.trainId).Contains(d.trainId)
select new
{
  trainId = d.trainId,
  date = d.date,
  arrival = d.arrival,
  departure = (from k in db.trains
               where
               k.date == d.date
               && k.trainId == d.trainId
               && k.stationId == fromStation
               && k.position <= d.position
               select k.departure).FirstOrDefault()
}
);

So you see, in order to get the departure, i have to retrieve the same thing again. So what i'm asking is can i save the object in the first query and then retrieve it later somehow? I can't get the syntax working.

The database looks something like this:

trainId stationId date       arrival departure position

1       99        2010-10-11 10:00   10:10     1
1       98        2010-10-11 11:20   11:30     2
1       47        2010-10-11 12:30   12:40     3
2       99        2010-10-10 15:00   15:10     5

etc

So bascially, i need to retrieve two objects from the db, where the first one has stationId x and the other one has stationId y and both have the same date and trainId, and they have to be in the proper order, based on position (trains go both ways, but with different trainId's).

Also, i would like to do be able to build this query dynamically, like this:

var trains = from d in db.trains
             select d;

if (id > 0)
  trains = trains.Where(p => p.trainId == id);

if (date != DateTime.MinValue)
  trains = trains.Where(p => p.date == date);

var items = (from train in trains).ToList();

I.e based on if various variables have values.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the let statement to store local variables and reuse them later
Something like this:

from d in db.trains
where d.cancelled
&& d.station == toStation
&& d.date >= fromDate.Date
&& d.date <= toDate.Date
let departures = (from k in db.trains
    where 
    k.date == d.date
    && k.trainId == d.trainId
    && k.stationId == fromStation
    && k.position <= d.position
    select k)
where departures.Select(d => d.trainId).Contains(d.trainId)
select new
{
  trainId = d.trainId,
  date = d.date,
  arrival = d.arrival,
  departure = departures.Select(d => d.departure).FirstOrDefault()
}
);
share|improve this answer
    
Aha, i knew there would be something like this :) Perfect. Just one problem, how do i retrieve different values from the "departures" list, i.e first check if it contains a trainobject with trainId x, and then retrieve the departure variable? I guess i need to store it first as a list of trains instead of list of ids, but how do i run contains on that? –  Johan Dec 4 '10 at 18:18
    
@Johan, sorry, read to quickly to see that it was different fields in the different subqueries, I updated my answer to store the whole trains in the departures-list. –  Albin Sunnanbo Dec 4 '10 at 19:08
    
Thank you Albin, that worked great! I've run a few tests now and i'm seeing a weird pattern. The first query i make like this is generally slower than the old way (especially with bigger results), but after the first one the new query is usually faster. Do you know why this would be, is the sql-server caching the query better or something? –  Johan Dec 4 '10 at 20:46
    
It's both the runtime query generation (converting the LINQ into a SQL statement) and the server caching the query structure. –  Adam Maras Dec 4 '10 at 22:10
    
Thank you Adam, i guessed it would be something like that. Makes sense i guess! Albin, do you have any suggestions on the second part of my question, how to make the query dynamic? –  Johan Dec 6 '10 at 8:15

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