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What is wrong with this?

class Vec2
  attr_accessor :x, :y
  # ...
  def += (v)
    @x += v.x
    @y += v.y
    return self
  end
  # ...
end

I've not been able to find much online. Someone said it is because += in ruby is done calling + and then =, he was kidding right?

In the amusing case he was right, is there some workaround (aside from defining a method called "add")?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Someone said it is because += in ruby is done calling + and then =, he was kidding right?

No, he is right (except that "calling =" is a bit inaccurate as = is not a method).

is there some workaround (aside from defining a method called "add")?

You mean other than defining + and living with the fact that += will change the variable and not the object?

You could change + to mutate the object and then return self, in which case v1 += v2 would be the same as v1 + v2 and would mutate the object. However I'd strongly advise against that as no one would expect + to be mutating (similarly most ruby-literate people would expect += to reassign the variable and not mutate the object, so trying to change that might just be inadvisable altogether).

Other than that, no, there's no way to work around this.

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Thanks, i will accept this since it address the work around part too. –  nespola Dec 4 '10 at 14:32
    
+1 for "However I'd strongly advise against that as no one would expect + to be mutating (similarly most ruby-literate people would expect += to reassign the variable and not mutate the object, so trying to change that might just be inadvisable altogether)." - nothing like setting up a booby-trap for the unexpecting. People went hog-wild overloading C++ operators, and I remember having to search out what they heck they'd done to know if an operator had new "features". –  the Tin Man Dec 4 '10 at 19:31

He was right. += is a language construct of sorts, that sets the variable reference equal to the result of the implied + operation. += can never actually be a method and behave as expected:

a = [1, 2, 3]
b = a
b << 4
b += [5, 6, 7]
p a # => [1, 2, 3, 4]
p b # => [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]

a and b here both contain references to the same object, which is why running << to add an element to b also affects a. As we can see, however, += isn't supposed to modify the object itself; it's supposed to change what's being stored in that variable, which is why the value of a is here untouched.

It really is exactly equivalent to the longhand.

b = a + [5, 6, 7]

Written that way, you expect a new array to be formed, and for a to remain the same. += is shorthand for exactly that, so does not mutate a in any way.

You can always define your own + to return a fresh vector.

def +(v)
  new_vector = self.class.new
  new_vector.x = @x + v.x
  new_vector.y = @y + v.y
  new_vector
end
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Actually i would expect exactly that, i.e. that += modify the object referenced by the variable, not the content of the variable, but i guess that is just me. Thanks for the answer anyway :) –  nespola Dec 4 '10 at 14:29
    
By the way, in the code it was @x += v.x; @y += v.y, because new_vector.x = @x + v, new_vector.y = @y + v doesn't make sense –  nespola Dec 4 '10 at 14:34
    
@nespola: …>_<. Just woke up. These are actually vectors being added. Get it now xD Edited appropriately. –  Matchu Dec 4 '10 at 14:40
1  
@nespola If += modified the object referenced by the variable, then a = 41; a+=1 would cause all integer values of 41 in your runtime to suddenly become 42. –  Phrogz Dec 4 '10 at 18:51

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