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In a highly concurrent Java program and assuming that my methods are correctly written and correctly synchronized, I am wondering about how to determine which is better:

void synchronized something() {
     ...
}

or

void something() {
     synchronized(this) {
         ...
     }
     // here do stuff no requiring synchronization
     .
     . // do computation 'A'
     .
     synchronized(this) {
         ...
     }
     // here do other stuff no requiring synchronization
     .
     . // do computation 'B'
     .
     synchronized(this) {
         ...
     }
}

Now I realize that if computation 'A' and 'B' takes a lot of time, the second version is obviously better.

My question, however, is : at which point do you know that the second version is more efficient?

Is the second version always faster or is there an hidden cost about acquiring/releasing the lock several times?

What if my computation 'A' is simply something trivial like:

s.getString().substring( 0, 2 ).toLowerCase();
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note that I do own my copy of "Java Concurrency in Practice" :) –  SyntaxT3rr0r Dec 4 '10 at 17:05

3 Answers 3

Yes, synchronized costs time. If the actual computations are simple and it's inside a loop or so, it costs lots of time compared to the actual computations.

See this example: http://ideone.com/zgpB7

  • Inner part synchronized: approximately 0.025s
  • Whole loop synchronized: less than 0.001s

To determine which one is better for your program, let it perform stuff and look at which time it's faster.

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+1... I am quite shocked :) I was nearly sure there was more to it than what meets the eye :) –  SyntaxT3rr0r Dec 4 '10 at 17:22
3  
The other thing that that example shows is that 1,000,000 synchrnonization locks take 0.024 seconds. So unless you are iterating millions of times, or you have proovable resource contention between threads, synchronization itself is really not that slow. (apparently 0.000000024 sec per lock on whatever machine ran those examples). –  Gus May 31 '12 at 14:21
    
I think the biggest hit to using big synchronized blocks is loss of concurrency. Suddenly your multiple processors don't help. If you have other threads that aren't waiting on the lock it may not be so bad though –  Cruncher Sep 4 '13 at 13:58

thejh makes a good point that there is some cost to repeatedly locking a thread. However, whenever I have talked with people about parallel threads, it has always been about making sure that all the threads execute quickly when running at the same time.

Keeping a lock for longer than required, can slow down the other threads. They have to sit and wait while you are doing work that will not interfere with the work they want to do. If this is a situation where milliseconds actually matter to you, you should use a profiler to see what works best given your situation. Multi-threading optimization is one of those situations where there are "best practices" that generally hold true, but you are not going to get rule that works in all situations. If you need that much granularity, you should test it and see.

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Does "correctly written" and "correctly synchronized" mean that there are no dependencies between the code-sections in the multi-synchronized case? If there are dependencies, then it could be that the multi-synchronized case could result in violation of an invariant. Put another way, can you guarantee that execution of the multi-synchronized case won't result in some object being in an invalid state? If not, then the single-synchronized case might be better.

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yup, it is guaranteed. That is precisely the premises of my question :) IOW, you can see my question as a purely theoretical question :) –  SyntaxT3rr0r Dec 4 '10 at 19:11
1  
@SpoonBender: In that case, the relative performance of the two solutions could depend upon the number of available CPU-s. –  Steve Emmerson Dec 23 '10 at 0:24
    
@SteveEmmerson or a function of the ratio between number of threads and CPU's. –  Cruncher Sep 4 '13 at 14:00

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