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I'm working on a UI for an app, and I'm attempting to use grayscale icons, and allow the user to change the theme to a color of their choosing. To do this, I'm trying to just apply a ColorFilter of some sort to overlay a color on top of the drawable. I've tried using PorterDuff.Mode.MULTIPLY, and it works almost exactly as I need, except that whites get overlayed with the color as well. What I'm ideally looking for is something like the "Color" blending mode in Photoshop, where the graphic retains its transparency and luminosity, and only modifies the color of the image. For example:

alt text becomes alt text

After doing some research, it appears that the ColorMatrixColorFilter class may do what I need, but I can't seem to find any resources pointing to how the matrix is used. It's a 4x5 matrix, but what I need to know is how I go about designing the matrix. Any ideas?

EDIT: So okay, what I've found so far on this is as follows:

1 0 0 0 0 //red
0 1 0 0 0 //green
0 0 1 0 0 //blue
0 0 0 1 0 //alpha

Where this matrix is the identity matrix (when applied, makes no changes), and the numbers range from 0 to 1 (floats). This matrix will be multiplied with each pixel to convert to the new color. So this is where it starts to get fuzzy for me. So I would think each pixel would be a 1 x 4 vector containing the argb values (e.g. 0.2, 0.5, 0.8, 1) that would be dotted with the transformation matrix. So to double the red intensity of an image, you would use a matrix such as:

2 0 0 0 0 
0 1 0 0 0 
0 0 1 0 0 
0 0 0 1 0 

which would give you a vector (color) of 0.4, 0.5, 0.8, 1. From limited testing, this seems to be the case, and works properly, but I actually still end up with the same problem (i.e. whites gain coloring). Further reading tells me that this is because it's doing the conversion on RGB values, whereas for hue shifting, the values should first be converted to HSL values. So possibly I could write a class that would read the image and convert the colors, and redraw the image with the new colors. This creates ANOTHER problem with StateListDrawables, as I'm not sure how I would go about getting each of these in code and modifying all of them, and how slow a process it would be. :/

Hmm, okay, so I suppose another question I would have is whether a matrix can be used to convert RGB to another color space with luminosity information, such as L*a*b or HSL? If so, I could just multiply the matrix for that converstion, then make the hue adjustment to THAT matrix, then apply that matrix as the ColorFilter.

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1  
The best article I found on this subject is here: active.tutsplus.com/tutorials/effects/… –  Richard Lalancette Oct 14 '11 at 14:56

8 Answers 8

up vote 40 down vote accepted

This is what I use for my game. This is the compilation of various part found on various articles on websites. Credits goes to the original author from the @see links. Note that a lot more can be done with color matrices. Including inverting, etc...

public class ColorFilterGenerator
{
    /**
 * Creates a HUE ajustment ColorFilter
 * @see http://groups.google.com/group/android-developers/browse_thread/thread/9e215c83c3819953
 * @see http://gskinner.com/blog/archives/2007/12/colormatrix_cla.html
 * @param value degrees to shift the hue.
 * @return
 */
public static ColorFilter adjustHue( float value )
{
    ColorMatrix cm = new ColorMatrix();

    adjustHue(cm, value);

    return new ColorMatrixColorFilter(cm);
}

/**
 * @see http://groups.google.com/group/android-developers/browse_thread/thread/9e215c83c3819953
 * @see http://gskinner.com/blog/archives/2007/12/colormatrix_cla.html
 * @param cm
 * @param value
 */
public static void adjustHue(ColorMatrix cm, float value)
{
    value = cleanValue(value, 180f) / 180f * (float) Math.PI;
    if (value == 0)
    {
        return;
    }
    float cosVal = (float) Math.cos(value);
    float sinVal = (float) Math.sin(value);
    float lumR = 0.213f;
    float lumG = 0.715f;
    float lumB = 0.072f;
    float[] mat = new float[]
    { 
            lumR + cosVal * (1 - lumR) + sinVal * (-lumR), lumG + cosVal * (-lumG) + sinVal * (-lumG), lumB + cosVal * (-lumB) + sinVal * (1 - lumB), 0, 0, 
            lumR + cosVal * (-lumR) + sinVal * (0.143f), lumG + cosVal * (1 - lumG) + sinVal * (0.140f), lumB + cosVal * (-lumB) + sinVal * (-0.283f), 0, 0,
            lumR + cosVal * (-lumR) + sinVal * (-(1 - lumR)), lumG + cosVal * (-lumG) + sinVal * (lumG), lumB + cosVal * (1 - lumB) + sinVal * (lumB), 0, 0, 
            0f, 0f, 0f, 1f, 0f, 
            0f, 0f, 0f, 0f, 1f };
    cm.postConcat(new ColorMatrix(mat));
}

protected static float cleanValue(float p_val, float p_limit)
{
    return Math.min(p_limit, Math.max(-p_limit, p_val));
}
}

To complete this I should add an example:

ImageView Sun = (ImageView)findViewById(R.id.sun);
Sun.setColorFilter(ColorFilterGenerator.adjustHue(162));
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, thanks! I'm not going to pretend I understand exactly what's going on with those matrix values, but I'm curious, what does the cleanValue() method do? –  kcoppock Oct 27 '11 at 15:46
3  
it makes sure it doesn't go out of bound and cause artifacts. –  Richard Lalancette Oct 27 '11 at 16:30
    
Thanks!! Works perfect! –  DragonWork Mar 25 '12 at 12:22
1  
@RichardLalancette Can you explain why the matrix mat in your code has 5 rows? Shouldn't it be 4 rows only (one for each R G B A)? –  ilomambo Apr 30 '13 at 11:24
    
@RichardLalancette OK I got it, it is to allow the matrix concatenation, isn't it? Correct me if I am wrong. –  ilomambo Apr 30 '13 at 11:30

here is the complete code if you want to adjust the bright, contrast, saturation and hue. Enjoy! Thanks a lot to @RichardLalancette

public class ColorFilterGenerator {

private static double DELTA_INDEX[] = {
    0,    0.01, 0.02, 0.04, 0.05, 0.06, 0.07, 0.08, 0.1,  0.11,
    0.12, 0.14, 0.15, 0.16, 0.17, 0.18, 0.20, 0.21, 0.22, 0.24,
    0.25, 0.27, 0.28, 0.30, 0.32, 0.34, 0.36, 0.38, 0.40, 0.42,
    0.44, 0.46, 0.48, 0.5,  0.53, 0.56, 0.59, 0.62, 0.65, 0.68, 
    0.71, 0.74, 0.77, 0.80, 0.83, 0.86, 0.89, 0.92, 0.95, 0.98,
    1.0,  1.06, 1.12, 1.18, 1.24, 1.30, 1.36, 1.42, 1.48, 1.54,
    1.60, 1.66, 1.72, 1.78, 1.84, 1.90, 1.96, 2.0,  2.12, 2.25, 
    2.37, 2.50, 2.62, 2.75, 2.87, 3.0,  3.2,  3.4,  3.6,  3.8,
    4.0,  4.3,  4.7,  4.9,  5.0,  5.5,  6.0,  6.5,  6.8,  7.0,
    7.3,  7.5,  7.8,  8.0,  8.4,  8.7,  9.0,  9.4,  9.6,  9.8, 
    10.0
};

/**
 * @see http://groups.google.com/group/android-developers/browse_thread/thread/9e215c83c3819953
 * @see http://gskinner.com/blog/archives/2007/12/colormatrix_cla.html
 * @param cm
 * @param value
 */
public static void adjustHue(ColorMatrix cm, float value)
{
    value = cleanValue(value, 180f) / 180f * (float) Math.PI;
    if (value == 0){
        return;
    }

    float cosVal = (float) Math.cos(value);
    float sinVal = (float) Math.sin(value);
    float lumR = 0.213f;
    float lumG = 0.715f;
    float lumB = 0.072f;
    float[] mat = new float[]
    { 
            lumR + cosVal * (1 - lumR) + sinVal * (-lumR), lumG + cosVal * (-lumG) + sinVal * (-lumG), lumB + cosVal * (-lumB) + sinVal * (1 - lumB), 0, 0, 
            lumR + cosVal * (-lumR) + sinVal * (0.143f), lumG + cosVal * (1 - lumG) + sinVal * (0.140f), lumB + cosVal * (-lumB) + sinVal * (-0.283f), 0, 0,
            lumR + cosVal * (-lumR) + sinVal * (-(1 - lumR)), lumG + cosVal * (-lumG) + sinVal * (lumG), lumB + cosVal * (1 - lumB) + sinVal * (lumB), 0, 0, 
            0f, 0f, 0f, 1f, 0f, 
            0f, 0f, 0f, 0f, 1f };
    cm.postConcat(new ColorMatrix(mat));
}

public static void adjustBrightness(ColorMatrix cm, float value) {
    value = cleanValue(value,100);
    if (value == 0) {
        return;
    }

    float[] mat = new float[]
    { 
        1,0,0,0,value,
        0,1,0,0,value,
        0,0,1,0,value,
        0,0,0,1,0,
        0,0,0,0,1
    };
    cm.postConcat(new ColorMatrix(mat));
}

public static void adjustContrast(ColorMatrix cm, int value) {
    value = (int)cleanValue(value,100);
    if (value == 0) { 
        return; 
    }
    float x;
    if (value < 0) {
        x = 127 + value / 100*127;
    } else {
        x = value % 1;
        if (x == 0) {
            x = (float)DELTA_INDEX[value];
        } else {
            //x = DELTA_INDEX[(p_val<<0)]; // this is how the IDE does it.
            x = (float)DELTA_INDEX[(value<<0)]*(1-x) + (float)DELTA_INDEX[(value<<0)+1] * x; // use linear interpolation for more granularity.
        }
        x = x*127+127;
    }

    float[] mat = new float[]
    { 
            x/127,0,0,0, 0.5f*(127-x),
            0,x/127,0,0, 0.5f*(127-x),
            0,0,x/127,0, 0.5f*(127-x),
            0,0,0,1,0,
            0,0,0,0,1
    };
    cm.postConcat(new ColorMatrix(mat));

}

public static void adjustSaturation(ColorMatrix cm, float value) {
    value = cleanValue(value,100);
    if (value == 0) {
        return;
    }

    float x = 1+((value > 0) ? 3 * value / 100 : value / 100);
    float lumR = 0.3086f;
    float lumG = 0.6094f;
    float lumB = 0.0820f;

    float[] mat = new float[]
    { 
        lumR*(1-x)+x,lumG*(1-x),lumB*(1-x),0,0,
        lumR*(1-x),lumG*(1-x)+x,lumB*(1-x),0,0,
        lumR*(1-x),lumG*(1-x),lumB*(1-x)+x,0,0,
        0,0,0,1,0,
        0,0,0,0,1
    };
    cm.postConcat(new ColorMatrix(mat));
}



protected static float cleanValue(float p_val, float p_limit)
{
    return Math.min(p_limit, Math.max(-p_limit, p_val));
}

public static ColorFilter adjustColor(int brightness, int contrast, int saturation, int hue){
    ColorMatrix cm = new ColorMatrix();
    adjustHue(cm, hue);
    adjustContrast(cm, contrast);
    adjustBrightness(cm, brightness);
    adjustSaturation(cm, saturation);

    return new ColorMatrixColorFilter(cm);
}
}
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Very nice, thanks! :) –  kcoppock Feb 27 '13 at 18:14

For anyone who is interested in how to use the ColorMatrixColorFilter. The sample I used here, converted every pixel into red when I draw the bitmap on the canvas.

The comment in the class is from: http://developer.android.com/reference/android/graphics/ColorMatrix.html this gives you some insights on how this is working

@Override
protected void onDraw(Canvas canvas) {

    // The matrix is stored in a single array, and its treated as follows: [ a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m, n, o, p, q, r, s, t ]
    // When applied to a color [r, g, b, a], the resulting color is computed as (after clamping) ;
    //   R' = a*R + b*G + c*B + d*A + e; 
    //   G' = f*R + g*G + h*B + i*A + j; 
    //   B' = k*R + l*G + m*B + n*A + o; 
    //   A' = p*R + q*G + r*B + s*A + t; 

    Paint paint = new Paint();
    float[] matrix = { 
        1, 1, 1, 1, 1, //red
        0, 0, 0, 0, 0, //green
        0, 0, 0, 0, 0, //blue
        1, 1, 1, 1, 1 //alpha
    };
    paint.setColorFilter(new ColorMatrixColorFilter(matrix));

    Rect source = new Rect(0, 0, 100, 100);
    Rect dest = new Rect(0, 0, 100, 100);

    Bitmap bitmap = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(context.getResources(), R.drawable.sampleimage);
    canvas.drawBitmap(bitmap , source, dest, paint);
}
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Your code worked perfectly for my case, where I needed to colour some PNGs: gist.github.com/puelocesar/9710910 - Thank you! –  Paulo Cesar Mar 22 at 17:21

There is no linear relationship between Hue and RGB. Hue is defined piecewise in 60° chunks (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HSL_color_space#General_approach), and therefore there is not a simple matrix conversion between HSV and RGB. To change the hue of an image, you can use the following method :

public Bitmap changeHue( Bitmap source, double hue ) {
    Bitmap result = Bitmap.createBitmap( source.getWidth(), source.getHeight(), source.getConfig() );

    float[] hsv = new float[3];
    for( int x = 0; x < source.getWidth(); x++ ) {
        for( int y = 0; y < source.getHeight(); y++ ) {
            int c = source.getPixel( x, y );
            Color.colorToHSV( c, hsv );
            hsv[0] = (float) ((hsv[0] + 360 * hue) % 360);
            c = (Color.HSVToColor( hsv ) & 0x00ffffff) | (c & 0xff000000);
            result.setPixel( x, y, c );
        }
    }

    return result;
}
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I think this method will give you what you want:

http://android.okhelp.cz/hue-color-colored-filter-bitmap-image-android-example/

bitmapOrg.setColorFilter(Color.RED, PorterDuff.Mode.MULTIPLY);
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I am currently working on an application where we are trying to do almost the exact same thing, except for modifying an RGB value instead of Hue. Initially my designer provided images with separate layers and a blend function applied like you mentioned above. They looked great, but when I ported them into the app, the blend can't be carried over so they turn out like crap.

I started researching color matrices, but like you found very little explaining how they work. So we decided to try to do this outside of code for now. My designer is basically trying to apply a graduated transparency level to the gray scale image so that the color overlay shows through well without distorting color or vice versa. My understanding is he is getting close, so I have my fingers crossed.

I was wondering if you would be willing to share some code via how you have accomplished this so far using a color filter? In return I could provide some images from my designer once he completes them as well as work with you on matrix development. I'll post an e-mail if your interested and maybe we can help each other.

Also, if your strategy has worked well so far except for whites (255,255,255), why don't you just export those to another layer and apply the whites over the top of the other images.

Thanks.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the ideas, I could do the thing with doing the whites as a separate layer, but right now I'm just doing the icons as a single image, which would be easier in the long run. I'll definitely post code here once I find something out. If it helps, here's a link I just ran across, but haven't had a chance to read through yet: emanueleferonato.com/2009/04/28/… –  kcoppock Dec 4 '10 at 20:36
    
Hmm, I've added in some new stuff, nothing solid yet though. –  kcoppock Dec 5 '10 at 6:41

I made a little ColorMatrixFilter tester, based on the following snippet:

private Bitmap setColorFilter(Bitmap drawable) {                
            Bitmap grayscale  = Bitmap.createBitmap(drawable.getWidth(), drawable.getHeight(), drawable.getConfig());
            //if(isRenderMode) bOriginal.recycle();
            Canvas c = new Canvas(grayscale );
            Paint p = new Paint();

            final ColorMatrix matrixA = new ColorMatrix();
            matrixA.setSaturation(sauturationValue/2);


            float[] mx = {
                    r1Value,  r2Value,  r3Value,  r4Value,  r5Value,
                    g1Value,  g2Value,  g3Value,  g4Value,  g5Value,
                    b1Value,  b2Value,  b3Value,  b4Value,  b5Value,
                    a1Value,  a2Value,  a3Value,  a4Value,  a5Value
                    };
                    final ColorMatrix matrixB = new ColorMatrix(mx);

            matrixA.setConcat(matrixB, matrixA);

            final ColorMatrixColorFilter filter = new ColorMatrixColorFilter(matrixA);
            p.setColorFilter(filter);
            c.drawBitmap(drawable, 0, 0, p);
            return grayscale;               
        } 

You can check it out here: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.vaelostudio.colormatrixtester

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Even though a lot of useful effects can be achieved by using the ColorMatrix I personally would consider using a ColorMap[] along with ImageAttributes. By doing this we can define which colors should be replaced with which colors.

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What's a ColorMap? I think there is no such class available in the standard java/ android libs. –  ılǝ Apr 10 at 6:52

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