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Is there a way to automatically justify words using letter spacing, each in its row, to a defined width, using CSS?

For example, "Something like this" would look, well, something like this:

"Something like this" would look something like this

Is there a non-obtrusive way to apply such styling to my text? I believe pure CSS doesn't have this option (at least not with CSS versions before 3, CSS3 seems to have a text-justify property, but it's not well supported yet), so js solutions would be fine also.

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Are you willing to employ any particular JS library to achieve this, or vanilla JS only? –  David Thomas Dec 6 '10 at 0:10
    
@David: jQuery would be preferred, but it's a rather simple task so it can be ported between frameworks without problems IMO. –  Groo Dec 7 '10 at 11:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's a script which can do it. It isn't pretty, but maybe you can hack it to meet your needs. (Updated to handle resizing)

<html>
<head>
<style>
#character_justify {
    position: relative;
    width: 40%;
    border: 1px solid red;
    font-size: 32pt;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}
#character_justify * {
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    border: none;
}
</style>
<script>
function SplitText(node)
{
    var text = node.nodeValue.replace(/^\s*|\s(?=\s)|\s*$/g, "");

    for(var i = 0; i < text.length; i++)
    {
        var letter = document.createElement("span");
        letter.style.display = "inline-block";
        letter.style.position = "absolute";
        letter.appendChild(document.createTextNode(text.charAt(i)));
        node.parentNode.insertBefore(letter, node);

        var positionRatio = i / (text.length - 1);
        var textWidth = letter.clientWidth;

        var indent = 100 * positionRatio;
        var offset = -textWidth * positionRatio;
        letter.style.left = indent + "%";
        letter.style.marginLeft = offset + "px";

        //console.log("Letter ", text[i], ", Index ", i, ", Width ", textWidth, ", Indent ", indent, ", Offset ", offset);
    }

    node.parentNode.removeChild(node);
}

function Justify()
{
    var TEXT_NODE = 3;
    var elem = document.getElementById("character_justify");
    elem = elem.firstChild;

    while(elem)
    {
        var nextElem = elem.nextSibling;

        if(elem.nodeType == TEXT_NODE)
            SplitText(elem);

        elem = nextElem;
    }
}

</script>
</head>
<body onload="Justify()">
<p id="character_justify">
Something<br/>
Like<br/>
This
</p>
</body>
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1  
Thanks, it works great. For those who are interested, this script finds a div by its Id, inserts a separate div for each character at calculated indents, and then removes the initial div. –  Groo Dec 4 '10 at 23:38
    
There is also a slight issue that characters are positioned at regular intervals instead of having fixed spacing between them. This looks strange when you have characters of different width (like "WiW" for example). I wondered if I could simply add spaces between letters and use browser justification like each character was a word, but they don't get justified if there is <br/> at the end. Do you have a suggestion? –  Groo Dec 7 '10 at 11:36
    
Ok, forgot about this, I will accept it now. I didn't use it at the end, but it's close enough. –  Groo Dec 20 '10 at 13:27

What is wrong with text-align: justify? I think I might be misunderstanding your question.

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12  
@CC: It doesn't justify single words by increasing letter spacing. –  Groo Dec 5 '10 at 19:08

I know this is an old topic, but I faced this the other night. And found a suitable solution using tables.

Every letter shall be put into a <td> </td> I know it looks tedious, but if you wanna do this, it would be for a word or two, right? Or you always can use JS to fill it if is too much. However, this is only CSS and very versatile solution.

Using letter-spacing the letters get distributed properly. You should play around with it, depending on the width of the table.

<html>
<style type="text/css">
#justify{width:300px; letter-spacing:0.5em;  }
</style>
<body>
<table id="justify">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td>J</td>
<td>U</td>
<td>S</td>
<td>T</td>
<td>I</td>
<td>F</td>
<td>Y</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</body>
</html>

See the example here

Crossbrowser safe, virtually nothing shall differ. Is just CSS.

I used it in My website which is in english and spanish. the subtitle under my name in spanish has an additional letter and it will step out the width. Using the tables explained above, it gets distributed to the same width automatically. Spacing it manually I'd had to define a whole condition for each language to go around that.

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Here is an other aproach using a jQuery snippet I wrote for this question : Stretch text to fit width of div :

DEMO

HTML :

<div class="stretch">Something</div>
<div class="stretch">Like</div>
<div class="stretch">This</div>

jQuery :

$.fn.strech_text = function () {
    var elmt = $(this),
        cont_width = elmt.width(),
        txt = elmt.html(),
        one_line = $('<span class="stretch_it">' + txt + '</span>'),
        nb_char = elmt.text().length,
        spacing = cont_width / nb_char,
        txt_width;

    elmt.html(one_line);
    txt_width = one_line.width();

    if (txt_width < cont_width) {
        var char_width = txt_width / nb_char,
            ltr_spacing = spacing - char_width + (spacing - char_width) / nb_char;

        one_line.css({
            'letter-spacing': ltr_spacing
        });
    } else {
        one_line.contents().unwrap();
        elmt.addClass('justify');
    }
};


$(document).ready(function () {
    $('.stretch').each(function () {
        $(this).strech_text();
    });
});
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