Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is generic to any language in which unit testing is done.

Most unit test libraries provide a way to control the order in which unit tests are run. Let's say I have a TestClass that defines twelve tests. Is there any good reason to try controlling the order the twelve tests run in? Keep in mind that any startup/shutdown code is already taken care of, because most libraries provide a way to do that to. The advantage I see to having an explicit test order is that you can compose your tests so each one uses only functionality that it tests directly or has already been tested by a prior test. The disadvantage is the maintenance cost of keeping the ordering up to date and ensuring that other developers understand why the order is what it is and work to preserve it.

Is this just not worth the effort?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's not worth the effort. More importantly than that, it's not a good practice. Each unit test should run independently from the others. If one of your tests depends on another being run first, it's not a good test.

As far as only using functionality that has been tested by another test, you don't need to "order" the tests to achieve this. Let's say you have a piece of basic logic, and there is a test for that logic (Test A). You test a more complex piece of logic in a new Test B, and this new test assumes that the basic logic is working. If something later goes wrong with the basic logic, Test A will fail, and Test B may fail also. That is fine. Test A will pinpoint the problem for you to fix it. It doesn't matter what order the tests run in.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for "unit test should run independently from the others." –  BЈовић Dec 4 '10 at 21:09

The advantage I see to having an explicit test order is that you can compose your tests so each one uses only functionality that it tests directly or has already been tested by a prior test.

I don't see much advantage here. Also, dependency frequently spreads across classes, so trying to sequence test runs by feature dependency would likely spread across multiple test classes, so ordering the run within a single test class wouldn't cover it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.