Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does creating an object using reflection rather than calling the class constructor result in any significant performance differences?

share|improve this question

13 Answers 13

up vote 88 down vote accepted

Yes - absolutely. Looking up a class via reflection is, by magnitude, more expensive.

Quoting Java's documentation on reflection:

Because reflection involves types that are dynamically resolved, certain Java virtual machine optimizations can not be performed. Consequently, reflective operations have slower performance than their non-reflective counterparts, and should be avoided in sections of code which are called frequently in performance-sensitive applications.

Here's a simple test I hacked up in 5 minutes on my machine, running Sun JRE 6u10:

public class Main {

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception
{
    doRegular();
    doReflection();
}

public static void doRegular() throws Exception
{
    long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i=0; i<1000000; i++)
    {
        A a = new A();
        a.doSomeThing();
    }
    System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - start);
}

public static void doReflection() throws Exception
{
    long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i=0; i<1000000; i++)
    {
        A a = (A) Class.forName("misc.A").newInstance();
        a.doSomeThing();
    }
    System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - start);
}
}

With these results:

35 // no reflection
465 // using reflection

Bear in mind the lookup and the instantiation are done together, and in some cases the lookup can be refactored away, but this is just a basic example.

Even if you just instantiate, you still get a performance hit:

30 // no reflection
47 // reflection using one lookup, only instantiating

Again, YMMV.

share|improve this answer
3  
On my machine the .newInstance() call with only one Class.forName() call scores 30 or so. Depending on VM version, the difference may be closer than you think with an appropriate caching strategy. –  Sean Reilly Jan 13 '09 at 20:14
20  
@Peter Lawrey below pointed out that this test was completely invalid because the compiler was optimizing out the non-reflective solution (It can even prove that nothing is done and optimize out the for loop). Needs to be re-worked and should probably be removed from S.O. as bad / misleading information. Cache the created objects in an array in both cases to prevent the optimizer from optimizing it out. (It can't do this in the reflective situation because it can't prove that the constructor doesn't have side-effects) –  Bill K May 5 '11 at 21:47
4  
@Bill K - let's not get carried away. Yes, the numbers are off due to optimizations. No, the test is not completely invalid. I added a call that removes any possibility of skewing the result, and the numbers are still stacked against reflection. In any case, remember that this is a very crude micro-benchmark which just shows that reflection always incurs a certain overhead –  Yuval Adam May 5 '11 at 23:23
2  
This is probably a useless benchmark. Depending on what doSomething does. If it does nothing with visible side effect, then your benchmark runs only dead code. –  nes1983 May 26 '12 at 10:13
4  
I just witnessed the JVM optimizing reflection 35 fold. Running the test repeatedly in a loop is how you test optimized code. First iteration: 3045ms, second iteration: 2941ms, third iteration: 90ms, fourth iteration: 83ms. Code: c.newInstance(i). c is a Constructor. Non reflective code: new A(i), which yields 13, 4, 3.. ms times. So yes, reflection in this case was slow, but not nearly as much slower as what people are concluding, because every test I'm seeing, they're simply running the test once without giving the JVM the opportunity to replace byte codes with machine code. –  Mike Nov 6 '12 at 17:42

Yes, it's slower.

But remember the damn #1 rule--PREMATURE OPTIMIZATION IS THE ROOT OF ALL EVIL

(Well, may be tied with #1 for DRY)

I swear, if someone came up to me at work and asked me this I'd be very watchful over their code for the next few months.

You must never optimize until you are sure you need it, until then, just write good, readable code.

Oh, and I don't mean write stupid code either. Just be thinking about the cleanest way you can possibly do it--no copy and paste, etc. (Still be wary of stuff like inner loops and using the collection that best fits your need--Ignoring these isn't "unoptimized" programming, it's "bad" programming)

It freaks me out when I hear questions like this, but then I forget that everyone has to go through learning all the rules themselves before they really get it. You'll get it after you've spent a man-month debugging something someone "Optimized".

EDIT:

An interesting thing happened in this thread. Check the #1 answer, it's an example of how powerful the compiler is at optimizing things. The test is completely invalid because the non-reflective instantiation can be completely factored out.

Lesson? Don't EVER optimize until you've written a clean, neatly coded solution and proven it to be too slow.

share|improve this answer
11  
I totally agree with the sentiment of this response, however if you're about to embark upon a major design decision it helps to have an idea about performance so you don't go off on a totally unworkable path. Maybe he's just doing due diligence? –  Limbic System Feb 13 '09 at 23:51
12  
-1: Avoiding doing things the wrong way is not optimisation, it is just doing things. Optimisation is doing things the wrong, complicated way because of either real or imaginary performance concerns. –  soru Jul 24 '10 at 11:06
3  
@soru totally agree. Choosing a linked list over an array list for an insertion sort is simply the right way to do things. But this particular question--there are good use cases for both sides of the original question, so choosing one based on performance rather than the most usable solution would be wrong. I'm not sure we are disagreeing at all, so I'm not sure why you said "-1". –  Bill K Jul 26 '10 at 17:35
4  
Any sensible analyst programmers needs to consider efficiency at an early stage or you might end up with a system that can NOT be optimised in an efficient and costworthy timeframe. No, you dont optimise every clock cycle but you most certainly DO employ best practices for something as basic as class instantiation. This example is a great one of WHY you consider such questions regarding reflection. It would be a pretty poor programmer who went ahead and used reflection throughout a million line system only to later discover it was orders of magnitude too slow. –  RichieHH Aug 15 '10 at 14:51
2  
@Richard Riley Generally class instantiation is a pretty rare event for the selected classes you will use reflection on. I suppose you are right though--some people might instantiate every class reflectively, even ones that are recreated constantly. I would call that pretty bad programming (although even then you COULD implement a cache of class instances for reuse after the fact and not harm your code too much--so I guess I'd still say ALWAYS design for readability, then profile and optimize later) –  Bill K Aug 16 '10 at 19:35

You may find that A a = new A() is being optimised out by the JVM. If you put the objects into an array, they don't perform so well. ;) The following prints...

new A(), 141 ns
A.class.newInstance(), 266 ns
new A(), 103 ns
A.class.newInstance(), 261 ns

public class Run {
    private static final int RUNS = 3000000;

    public static class A {
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        doRegular();
        doReflection();
        doRegular();
        doReflection();
    }

    public static void doRegular() throws Exception {
        A[] as = new A[RUNS];
        long start = System.nanoTime();
        for (int i = 0; i < RUNS; i++) {
            as[i] = new A();
        }
        System.out.printf("new A(), %,d ns%n", (System.nanoTime() - start)/RUNS);
    }

    public static void doReflection() throws Exception {
        A[] as = new A[RUNS];
        long start = System.nanoTime();
        for (int i = 0; i < RUNS; i++) {
            as[i] = A.class.newInstance();
        }
        System.out.printf("A.class.newInstance(), %,d ns%n", (System.nanoTime() - start)/RUNS);
    }
}

This suggest the difference is about 150 ns on my machine.

share|improve this answer
    
so you've just killed the optimiser, so now both versions are slow. Reflection is, therefore, still damn slow. –  gbjbaanb Feb 13 '09 at 23:39
5  
@gbjbaanb if the optimizer was optimizing out the creation itself then it wasn't a valid test. @Peter's test is therefore valid because it actually compares the creation times (The optimizer wouldn't be able to work in ANY real-world situation because in any real-world situation you need the objects you are instantiating). –  Bill K May 5 '11 at 21:43
    
Useless benchmark. Runs only dead code. –  nes1983 May 26 '12 at 10:11
2  
@nes1983 In which case you could have taken the opportunity to create a better benchmark. Perhaps you can offer something constructive, like what should be in the body of the method. –  Peter Lawrey May 26 '12 at 15:05
1  
on my mac, openjdk 7u4, the difference is 95ns versus 100ns. Instead of storing A's in the array, I store hashCodes. If you say -verbose:class you can see when hotspot generates bytecode for constructing A and the accompanying speedup. –  Ron May 26 '12 at 18:33

There is some overhead with reflection, but it's a lot smaller on modern VMs than it used to be.

If you're using reflection to create every simple object in your program then something is wrong. Using it occasionally, when you have good reason, shouldn't be a problem at all.

share|improve this answer

If there really is need for something faster than reflection, and it's not just a premature optimization, then bytecode generation with ASM or a higher level library is an option. Generating the bytecode the first time is slower than just using reflection, but once the bytecode has been generated, it is as fast as normal Java code and will be optimized by the JIT compiler.

Some examples of applications which use code generation:

  • Invoking methods on proxies generated by CGLIB is slightly faster than Java's dynamic proxies, because CGLIB generates bytecode for its proxies, but dynamic proxies use only reflection (I measured CGLIB to be about 10x faster in method calls, but creating the proxies was slower).

  • JSerial generates bytecode for reading/writing the fields of serialized objects, instead of using reflection. There are some benchmarks on JSerial's site.

  • I'm not 100% sure (and I don't feel like reading the source now), but I think Guice generates bytecode to do dependency injection. Correct me if I'm wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for providing a possible solution –  Nikola Kolev Mar 14 at 15:25

"Significant" is entirely dependent on context.

If you're using reflection to create a single handler object based on some configuration file, and then spending the rest of your time running database queries, then it's insignificant. If you're creating large numbers of objects via reflection in a tight loop, then yes, it's significant.

In general, design flexibility (where needed!) should drive your use of reflection, not performance. However, to determine whether performance is an issue, you need to profile rather than get arbitrary responses from a discussion forum.

share|improve this answer

Yes, it is significantly slower. We were running some code that did that, and while I don't have the metrics available at the moment, the end result was that we had to refactor that code to not use reflection. If you know what the class is, just call the constructor directly.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I've had a similar experience. It's good to make sure to only use reflection if it's absolutely necessary. –  Ryan Thames Jan 12 '09 at 20:29

Reflection is slow, though object allocation is not as hopeless as other aspects of reflection. Achieving equivalent performance with reflection-based instantiation requires you to write your code so the jit can tell which class is being instantiated. If the identity of the class can't be determined, then the allocation code can't be inlined. Worse, escape analysis fails, and the object can't be stack-allocated. If you're lucky, the JVM's run-time profiling may come to the rescue if this code gets hot, and may determine dynamically which class predominates and may optimize for that one.

Be aware the microbenchmarks in this thread are deeply flawed, so take them with a grain of salt. The least flawed by far is Peter Lawrey's: it does warmup runs to get the methods jitted, and it (consciously) defeats escape analysis to ensure the allocations are actually occurring. Even that one has its problems, though: for example, the tremendous number of array stores can be expected to defeat caches and store buffers, so this will wind up being mostly a memory benchmark if your allocations are very fast. (Kudos to Peter on getting the conclusion right though: that the difference is "150ns" rather than "2.5x". I suspect he does this kind of thing for a living.)

share|improve this answer

In the doReflection() is the overhead because of Class.forName("misc.A") (that would require a class lookup, potentially scanning the class path on the filsystem), rather than the newInstance() called on the class. I am wondering what the stats would look like if the Class.forName("misc.A") is done only once outside the for-loop, it doesn't really have to be done for every invocation of the loop.

share|improve this answer

Interestingly enough, settting setAccessible(true), which skips the security checks, has a 20% reduction in cost.

Without setAccessible(true)

new A(), 70 ns
A.class.newInstance(), 214 ns
new A(), 84 ns
A.class.newInstance(), 229 ns

With setAccessible(true)

new A(), 69 ns
A.class.newInstance(), 159 ns
new A(), 85 ns
A.class.newInstance(), 171 ns
share|improve this answer
1  
Seems obvious to me in principle. Do these numbers scale linearly, when running 1000000 invocations? –  Lukas Eder Dec 29 '11 at 20:12

Yes, always will be slower create an object by reflection because the JVM cannot optimize the code on compilation time. See the Sun/Java Reflection tutorials for more details.

See this simple test:

public class TestSpeed {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        long startTime = System.nanoTime();
        Object instance = new TestSpeed();
        long endTime = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println(endTime - startTime + "ns");

        startTime = System.nanoTime();
        try {
            Object reflectionInstance = Class.forName("TestSpeed").newInstance();
        } catch (InstantiationException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        endTime = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println(endTime - startTime + "ns");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Note that you should separate the lookup (Class.forName()) from the instanciation (newInstance()), because they vary significantly in their performance characteristics and you can occasionally avoid the repeated lookup in a well-designed system. –  Joachim Sauer Jan 12 '09 at 14:39
3  
Also: you need to execute each task many, many times to get a useful benchmark: first of all the actions are too slow to be measured reliably and secondly you'll need to warm up the HotSpot VM to get useful numbers. –  Joachim Sauer Jan 12 '09 at 14:40

Often you can use Apache commons BeanUtils or PropertyUtils which introspection (basically they cache the meta data about the classes so they don't always need to use reflection).

share|improve this answer

Yes there is a performance hit when using Reflection but a possible workaround for optimization is caching the method:

  Method md = null;     // Call while looking up the method at each iteration.
      millis = System.currentTimeMillis( );
      for (idx = 0; idx < CALL_AMOUNT; idx++) {
        md = ri.getClass( ).getMethod("getValue", null);
        md.invoke(ri, null);
      }

      System.out.println("Calling method " + CALL_AMOUNT+ " times reflexively with lookup took " + (System.currentTimeMillis( ) - millis) + " millis");



      // Call using a cache of the method.

      md = ri.getClass( ).getMethod("getValue", null);
      millis = System.currentTimeMillis( );
      for (idx = 0; idx < CALL_AMOUNT; idx++) {
        md.invoke(ri, null);
      }
      System.out.println("Calling method " + CALL_AMOUNT + " times reflexively with cache took " + (System.currentTimeMillis( ) - millis) + " millis");

will result in:

[java] Calling method 1000000 times reflexively with lookup took 5618 millis

[java] Calling method 1000000 times reflexively with cache took 270 millis

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.