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In the code below, I needed to fetch an element, any element, from toSearch. I was unable to find a useful method on the Set interface definition to return just a single (random, but not required to be random) member of the set. So, I used the toArray()[0] technique (present in the code below).

private Set<Coordinate> floodFill(Value value, Coordinate coordinateStart)
{
    Set<Coordinate> result = new LinkedHashSet<Coordinate>();

    Set<Coordinate> toSearch = new LinkedHashSet<Coordinate>();
    toSearch.add(coordinateStart);
    while (toSearch.size() > 0)
    {
        Coordinate coordinate = (Coordinate)toSearch.toArray()[0];
        result.add(coordinate);
        toSearch.remove(coordinate);
        for (Coordinate coordinateAdjacent: getAdjacentCoordinates(coordinate))
        {
            if (this.query.getCoordinateValue(coordinateAdjacent) == value)
            {
                if (!result.contains(coordinateAdjacent))
                {
                    toSearch.add(coordinateAdjacent);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return result;
}

The other technique I have seen discussed is to replace "(Coordinate)toSearch.toArray()[0]" with "toSearch.iterator().next()". Which technique, toArray() or iterator(), is the most likely to execute the most quickly with the least GC (Garbage Collection) impact?

My intuition (after composing this question) is that the second technique using the Iterator will be both faster in execution and lower overhead for the GC. Given I don't know the implementation of the Set being passed (assuming HashSet or LinkedHashSet as most likely), how much overhead is incurred in each of the toArray() or iterator() methods? Any insights on this would be greatly appreciated.

Questions (repeated from above):

  1. Which technique, toArray() or iterator(), is the most likely to execute the most quickly with the least GC (Garbage Collection) impact?
  2. Given I don't know the implementation of the Set being passed (assuming HashSet or LinkedHashSet as most likely), how much overhead is incurred in each of the toArray() and iterator() methods?
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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

toSearch.iterator().next() will be faster and less memory-intensive because it does not need to copy any data, whereas toArray will allocate and copy the contents of the set into the array. This is irrespective of the actual implementation: toArray will always have to copy data.

share|improve this answer
    
That makes sense to me. And is it even further accurate to assume that the when toArray() is generating the array, it's likely using the very same iterator implementation to fill it? If so, then it's pretty obvious to me the iterator approach is way preferred. –  chaotic3quilibrium Dec 5 '10 at 0:21
    
It may or may not use the iterator to fill the array. An ArrayList probably won't - it can use System.arrayCopy to do a fast copy. You don't want to be copying data if you can avoid it in any case. –  Cameron Skinner Dec 5 '10 at 0:25
    
It's difficult for me to believe I am the first person to encounter this dilemma. It sure would have been nice if the Set interface had a method defined, say iteratorFirstElement() which had implementations default to iterator().next(). Instead, I have to put this snippet all over my code base. Ugh! –  chaotic3quilibrium Dec 5 '10 at 0:29
    
You're not the first :) However, in your case it looks like @Petro is right: you could replace the Set with a Queue and avoid the problem. You can use a Set to hold visited nodes in your search to avoid cycles and a Queue to hold the open node set. –  Cameron Skinner Dec 5 '10 at 0:32

From what I can see you are doing Breadth First Search

Below is the example how it could be implemented without using toArray:

    private Set<Coordinate> floodFill(Value value, Coordinate coordinateStart) {
    final Set<Coordinate> visitedCoordinates = new LinkedHashSet<Coordinate>();
    final Deque<Coordinate> deque = new ArrayDeque<Coordinate>();

    deque.push(coordinateStart);

    while (!deque.isEmpty()) {
        final Coordinate currentVertex = deque.poll();
        visitedCoordinates.add(currentVertex);
        for (Coordinate coordinateAdjacent : getAdjacentCoordinates(currentVertex)) {
            if (this.query.getCoordinateValue(coordinateAdjacent) == value) {
                if (!visitedCoordinates.contains(coordinateAdjacent)) {
                    deque.add(coordinateAdjacent);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return visitedCoordinates;
}

Implementation notes:

And now I am concerned that the contains() method's implementation on LinkedList could be doing up to a a full scan of the contents before returning the answer.

You are right about full scan (aka linear search). Nevertheless, In your case it's possible to have additional set for tracking already visited vertexes(btw, actually it's your result!), that would solve issue with contains method in O(1) time.

Cheers

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I just copied the method and reimplemented using a Queue<Coordinate> toSearch = new LinkedList<Coordinate>(); By doing that, though, I lost the automatic "duplicate elimination" that comes from add() when the member is already present. So, I had to add an additional if (!toSearch.contains(coordinateAdjacent)) statement to prevent elements from being duplicated in the Queue. Without testing, it feels like I made the method more costly (how fast is the contains() method on a LinkedList (my memory from many years ago is that it is very poor). –  chaotic3quilibrium Dec 5 '10 at 0:55
    
I'll post my reimplementation with Queue as an answer. –  chaotic3quilibrium Dec 5 '10 at 0:55
    
Nice implementation. Question: Why did you use Deque as opposed to Queue? Is there a subtle advantage I am not understanding? –  chaotic3quilibrium Dec 6 '10 at 16:00
    
Good question. I think in this particular case there is no advantage. Deque supports element insertion and removal at both ends(as opposed to queue). I usually using this general interface when I need stack/queue. You could safely use Queue here. Cheers. –  Petro Semeniuk Dec 6 '10 at 22:46
    
Awesome! Tyvm, Petro. –  chaotic3quilibrium Dec 7 '10 at 3:29

Here's how I'd implement this:

private Set<Coordinate> floodFill(Value value, Coordinate start) {
    Set<Coordinate> result = new LinkedHashSet<Coordinate>();
    LinkedList<Coordinate> toSearch = new LinkedList<Coordinate>();
    toSearch.add(start);
    do {
        Coordinate coordinate = toSearch.removeFirst();
        if (result.add(coordinate)) {
            for (Coordinate ajacent: getAdjacentCoordinates(coordinate)) {
                if (this.query.getCoordinateValue(adjacent) == value) {
                    toSearch.add(adjacent);
                }
            }
        }
    } while (!toSearch.isEmpty());
    return result;
}

Notes:

  1. If you think about it, the toSearch data structure doesn't need to contain unique elements.
  2. Using a LinkedList for toSearch means that there is a simple method to get an element and remove it in one go.
  3. We can use the fact that Set.add(...) returns a boolean to have the number of lookups in the result set ... compared with using Set.contains().
  4. It would be better to use HashSet rather than LinkedHashSet for the results ... unless you need to know the order in which coordinates were added by the fill.
  5. Using == to compare Value instances is potentially a bit dodgy.
share|improve this answer
    
Nice! Regarding point "5. Using == to compare Value is potentially a bit dodgy." - Value is an Enum. I could turn it into a equals() and as long as HotSpot inlined the code, it ought to result in the same comparison (given my understanding of the how Enum was implemented). –  chaotic3quilibrium Dec 6 '10 at 15:29
    
Regarding point 4, I am using a LinkedHashSet so that I have "reproducability". HashSet's iterator() has no ordering constraints which makes it very difficult to re-create a precise context when I uncover an issue. –  chaotic3quilibrium Dec 6 '10 at 18:58
    
1) Calls to Value.equals(...) would be inlined if it is just ==. 2) The fact that the HashSet iterator is not reproducible suggests that Coordinate does not overload equals and hashCode. That means that getAdjacentCoordinates must always return the same coordinate object instances for a given coordinate. –  Stephen C Dec 6 '10 at 21:16
    
If Coordinate.equals and hashcode used the x & y indexes, then the iteration order of a HashSet for Coordinates would be 100% reproducible, even though it looked "random". (I'm assuming that the visit order stays the same.) –  Stephen C Dec 6 '10 at 21:21
    
My direct experience with HashSet is that the order of returned instances from next() on iterator() is not deterministic (even if equals and hashCode validly implemented AND using the same insertion order). Here's a recent SOF thread indicating this is a pretty common problem: stackoverflow.com/questions/2704597/iteration-order-of-hashset –  chaotic3quilibrium Dec 7 '10 at 3:34

After Petro's response, I copied the method and reimplemented it according to his suggestions. It looks like this:

private Set<Coordinate> floodFind2(Value value, Coordinate coordinateStart)
{
    Set<Coordinate> result = new LinkedHashSet<Coordinate>();

    Queue<Coordinate> toSearch = new LinkedList<Coordinate>();
    toSearch.add(coordinateStart);
    while (!toSearch.isEmpty())
    {
        Coordinate coordinate = toSearch.remove();
        result.add(coordinate);
        for (Coordinate coordinateAdjacent: getAdjacentCoordinates(coordinate))
        {
            if (getCoordinateValue(coordinateAdjacent).equals(value))
            {
                if (!result.contains(coordinateAdjacent))
                {
                    if (!toSearch.contains(coordinateAdjacent))
                    {
                        toSearch.add(coordinateAdjacent);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return result;
}

By moving from Set to Queue, my efficiency questions shifted to the new conditional check I had to add, "if (!toSearch.contains(coordinateAdjacent))". Using the Set interface, it silently stopped me from adding duplicates. Using the Queue interface, I have to check to ensure I'm not adding a duplicate.

And now I am concerned that the contains() method's implementation on LinkedList could be doing up to a a full scan of the contents before returning the answer. So, comparing this method to the one I originally posted, which is likely to be more efficient (before I go spend a good quantity of time doing the empirical testing)?

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Looks like this might be a more common problem than I thought initially: stackoverflow.com/questions/2319086/… –  chaotic3quilibrium Dec 5 '10 at 3:50
    
It's really impossible to say which variant would be faster without trying this out empirically. For one thing, it depends on how the data is disctributed, will toSearch.contains() find the item fast, or will it be more often searching through the list? –  Andrew Eisenberg Dec 5 '10 at 3:58
    
Is this an answer? It doesn't look like one to me. –  Stephen C Dec 5 '10 at 13:10
    
I'd suggest you also maintain a Set of already-explored nodes. Your current implementation will enter an infinite loop if you have 4 nodes, A, B, C and D, such that they form a square (i.e. A -> B, B -> C, C -> D, D -> A and the reverse edges). You can add each node as you visit it to the explored set and check that new neighbours have not already been explored. These two operations are both constant time with a HashSet. –  Cameron Skinner Dec 5 '10 at 14:07
    
Oh! I just noticed the if (!result.contains(...)) bit. Ignore that last comment. –  Cameron Skinner Dec 5 '10 at 22:00

Okay, below is my latest implementation incorporating feedback (mainly from Stephen, Cameron and Petro) which includes completely eliminating the toArray()[]-vs-interator().next() conflict. And I have sprinkled in comments to more accurately distinguish what's occurring and why. And to better clarify why I concretely implemented Petro's original "use a tracking Set" advice (seconded by Cameron). And just after the code snippet, I will contrast it with the other proposed solutions.

private Set<Coordinate> floodFind3(Coordinate coordinate)
{
    Set<Coordinate> area = new LinkedHashSet<Coordinate>(); //includes only area of value (which is the same as at coordinate)

    area.add(coordinate);
    Value value = getCoordinateValue(coordinate); //value upon which to expand area
    Set<Coordinate> checked = new LinkedHashSet<Coordinate>(); //every coordinate evaluated regardless of value
    checked.add(coordinate);
    Queue<Coordinate> candidates = new LinkedList<Coordinate>(); //coordinates evaluated, were of value, and are queued to iterate through their adjacents
    candidates.add(nordinate);
    while (!candidates.isEmpty())
    {
        for (Nordinate coordinateAdjacent: this.query.getNordinates().getAdjacent(candidates.remove()).getOrthogonal())
        {
            if (checked.add(coordinateAdjacent)) //only expands containing value and !value
            {
                if (getCoordinateValue(coordinateAdjacent) == value)
                {
                    area.add(coordinateAdjacent); //only expands containing value
                    candidates.add(coordinateAdjacent); //expands and contracts containing value
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return area;
}

I have updated the method several significant ways:

  1. One less method parameter: I removed a parameter as it was derivable from the search and eliminated a possible logical issue where the starting coordinate is pointing at a location containing !value.
  2. Three collections track the search; area (Set), checked (Set) and candidates (Queue). The code comments clarify the specific use of each. Used LinkedHashSet for reliable reproducability while chasing bugs and performance issues (http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2704597/iteration-order-of-hashset). Once stable, I will likely revert to faster HashSet implementation.
  3. Reordered the "check if already evaluated" test prior to the "is value" test to only visit every coordinate exactly once. This avoids revisiting !value adjacent coordinates more than once. Also incorporated Stephen's clever double use of the Set add() method. This becomes very important as the area to flood becomes more maze-like (snakely/spidery).
  4. Kept the "==" for checking value forcing a reference comparison. Value is defined to be a Java 1.5 Enum and I didn't want to depend upon HotSpot to both inline the .equals() method call and reduce it to a reference comparison. If Value were ever to change from being an Enum, this choice could come back to bite me. Tyvm to Stephen for pointing this out.

Petro's and Stephan's solutions visit the coordinates containing value just once, but require revisiting the coordinates containing !value more than once, which can result in quite a few duplicate fetches/value checks for areas consisting of long maze-like tunnels. While "long maze-like tunnels" may be considered a pathological case, it is more typical of the particular domain for which I need this method. And my "2nd" attempted solution (which had the poor performance LinkedList contains() call) was questionable as a real answer ({nod} to Stephen on that one).

Thank you for all your feedback.

Next up, lots of empirical testing with single variations/changes over hundreds of millions of invocations. I'll update this answer with details sometime this weekend.

share|improve this answer
    
Since you are starting from graph and building tree from it I'd recommend to use TreeSet for area. Order guaranteed. –  Petro Semeniuk Dec 7 '10 at 5:27
    
Petro, interesting. I will check it out and see how it affects performance. –  chaotic3quilibrium Dec 7 '10 at 19:44
    
Generally you'll get O(log(N)) during searching/checking/inserting operations. HashSet is cheaper and have O(1) for all of these. The bigger N the smaller performance difference you'll get. –  Petro Semeniuk Dec 8 '10 at 0:52
    
After extensive testing in a number of configurations, it turns out that Stephen C's implementation above is between 4-12% faster than any of the other solution variations. –  chaotic3quilibrium Dec 24 '10 at 20:15

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