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Here is my R code. The functions are defined as:

f <- function(x, T){
  10*sin(0.3*x)*sin(1.3*x^2)+0.001*x^3+0.2*x+80 }

g <- function(x, T, f=f){
 exp(-f(x)/T) }

 test<- function(g=g, T=1){  g(1,T) }

The running error is:

> test()
Error in test() :
promise already under evaluation: recursive default argument reference or earlier problems?

If I substitute the definition of f in that of g, then the error goes away.

I was wondering what the error was? How to correct it if don't substitute the definition of f in that of g? Thanks!


Update:

Thanks! Two questions:

(1) if function test further takes an argument for f, will you add something like test <- function(g.=g, T=1, f..=f){ g.(1,T, f.=f..) } ? In cases with more recursions, is it a good and safe practice adding more .?

(2) if f is a non-function argument, for example g <- function(x, T, f=f){ exp(-f*x/T) } and test <- function(g.=g, T=1, f=f){ g.(1,T, f=f.) }, will using the same name for both formal and actual non-functional arguments a good and safe practice or it may cause some potential trouble?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Arguments of the form x=x cause this. Eliminating the two instances where they occur we get:

> f <- function(x, T){
+   10*sin(0.3*x)*sin(1.3*x^2)+0.001*x^3+0.2*x+80 }
> 
> g <- function(x, T, f.=f){
+  exp(-f.(x)/T) }
> 
> test<- function(g.=g, T=1){  g.(1,T) }
> 
> test()
[1] 8.560335e-37
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1  
Thanks! Two questions (1) if function test further takes an argument for f, will you add something like test<- function(g.=g, T=1, f..=f){ g.(1,T, f.=f..) }? In cases with more recursions, is it a good and safe practice adding more .? (2) if f is a non-function argument, for example g <- function(x, T, f=f){ exp(-fx/T) }* and test<- function(g.=g, T=1, f=f){ g.(1,T, f=f.) }, will using the same name for both formal and actual non-functional arguments a good and safe practice or it may cause some potential trouble? –  Tim Dec 8 '10 at 17:53
4  
Any other solutions? I'm passing some arguments quite deep down the chain of functions (about 5 levels), and this solution can become .....cumbersome. :) –  Roman Luštrik Feb 9 '12 at 13:59
    
What if I cannot change the name of an argument, e.g., when the function in question is a system function like get? –  sds Jun 25 '13 at 13:27
    
@#sds, The discussion here relates to defining default arguments in function definitions. If you are not defining a function but simply using existing functions then its all irrelevant. –  G. Grothendieck Jun 25 '13 at 13:35

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