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I'm just beginning understanding delegates, I have a class that implemens IDisposable:

public class MyClass : IDisposable
{
  public delegate int DoSomething();

  public int Zero() {return 0;}
  public int One() {return 1;}

  public void Dispose()
  {
    // Cleanup
  }
}

A method (defined in an another class) that is using MyClass:

public class AnotherCLass
{
    public static void UseMyClass(MyClass.DoSomething func)
    {
      using (var mc = new MyClass())
      {
        // Call the delegate function
        mc.func(); // <-------- this is what i should actually call
      }
    }
}

The actual question: how pass the Zero() function to UseMyClass method? Do I have to create an instance of MyClass (I would like to avoid this...)?

public static void main(string[] args)
{
  // Call AnotherClass method, by passing Zero()
  // or One() but without instatiate MyCLass
  AnotherClass.UseMyClass(??????????);
}
share|improve this question
1  
Maybe if you can explain what you are trying to do, we might be able to recommend something better. –  IAbstract Dec 5 '10 at 5:14
    
MyClass is DAL, I have some member methods to call. From another class (business) is using the DAL and define "UseMyClass" method. How can I pass Zero() function to the business class from the GUI, without create a new instance of MyClass? –  gremo Dec 5 '10 at 5:28
    
You might consider using an interface on your MyClass object to expose the Zero() property and then have your UseMyClass function take that interface as an argument. IMHO, seems like a better way to me. –  Sergey Dec 5 '10 at 5:31
    
No, i won't. I don't like explosion of hierarchy... see my edits –  gremo Dec 5 '10 at 5:33
    
I'm confused here. If the function Zero() is not static, how do you expect to call it - either as a delegate or any other way - without an instance of MyClass? And if you want to call it without an instance of MyClass, why don't you just make it static? –  Carson63000 Dec 5 '10 at 5:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because it's an instance method, if you want to call it, you need an instance. That's simply how the CLR works. However, there are two options you could go with:

  • Make the member functions static. If they're as simple as returning a static value, there's no reason for them to be instance methods. However, if you do actually require instance data...
  • Use a singleton instance. This way you don't need to create a new instance every time you want to call your static method.

You can do the latter like this:

public class MyClass
{
    private static MyClass singletonInstance;
    public static MyClass SingletonInstance
    {
        get
        {
            if (singletonInstance == null)
            {
                singletonInstance = new MyClass();
            }
            return singletonInstance;
        }
    }

    // the rest of your class implementation
}

Then, you can call your static method like so:

AnotherClass.UseMyClass(MyClass.SingletonInstance.Zero);
share|improve this answer

Is your intent that the instance is provided by the caller of the delegate, and not the creator of the delegate? C# does support such an unbound delegate, it's called an open delegate, and the instance becomes a parameter.

You have to use Delegate.CreateDelegate to create an open delegate, something like this:

public class MyClass : IDisposable
{
  public delegate int DoSomething();

  public int Zero() {return 0;}
  public int One() {return 1;}

  public void Dispose()
  {
    // Cleanup
  }
}

public class AnotherCLass
{
    public static void UseMyClass(Converter<MyClass,int> func)
    {
      using (var mc = new MyClass())
      {
        // Call the delegate function
        func(mc);
      }
    }
}

AnotherClass.UseMyClass(
    (Converter<MyClass, int>)Delegate.CreateDelegate(
        typeof(Converter<MyClass, int>),
        typeof(MyClass).GetMethod("One")
    )
);

Of course, you can do it much more easily with a shim:

AnotherClass.UseMyClass( mc => mc.One() ); // C# 3 or later
AnotherClass.UseMyClass( delegate(MyClass mc) { return mc.One(); } ); // C# 2
share|improve this answer
    
No, should be mc.func(), not as you wrote. –  gremo Dec 5 '10 at 6:35
    
Gremo: C# doesn't support doing mc.func() as you want. The func(mc) syntax is correct. –  Gabe Dec 5 '10 at 6:59

Cant be done without instantiation. Heres how you can do it:


public static void main(string[] args)
{
  // Call AnotherClass method, by passing Zero()
  // or One() but without instatiate MyCLass
  AnotherClass.UseMyClass((new MyClass()).Zero);
}

share|improve this answer
    
I was afraid that this is the only solution... thanks btw –  gremo Dec 5 '10 at 5:51
    
most welcome. Hope you enjoy c# as much as I do :) –  basarat Dec 5 '10 at 5:54

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