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i want to Capturing the Enter key to cause a button click

i have this javascript:

    function doClick(buttonName,e)
    {
        //the purpose of this function is to allow the enter key to 
        //point to the correct button to click.
        var key;

         if(window.event)
              key = window.event.keyCode;     //IE
         else
              key = e.which;     //firefox

        if (key == 13)
        {
            //Get the button the user wants to have clicked
            var btn = document.getElementById('submit');
            if (btn != null)
            { //If we find the button click it
                btn.click();
                event.keyCode = 0
            }
        }
   }

with html

<input type="button" id="submit" value="Search" onClick="doSomeThing();" />
<input type="text" name="search" onKeyPress="doClick('submit',event)" />

this is work fine with IE browser but it didn't with Firefox,

Why ? can anybody fix this javascript code to work on all browsers.

thank you

share|improve this question
    
Could you elaborate on what is happening? Is the method being called at all? –  cwallenpoole Dec 5 '10 at 12:11
    
yes at all. thank you –  Swell Dec 5 '10 at 12:48
    
this link will help you definatly stackoverflow.com/questions/155188/… –  user1587696 Aug 16 '12 at 7:02

4 Answers 4

You should really not use inline event handlers:

window.onload = function() {
   document.getElementById('submit').onclick = doSomething;
   document.getElementById('search').onkeypress = function(e) {
       doClick('submit', e);
   };
};

function doClick(buttonName,e)
{
  //the purpose of this function is to allow the enter key to 
  //point to the correct button to click.
  var ev = e || window.event;
  var key = ev.keyCode;

  if (key == 13)
  {
     //Get the button the user wants to have clicked
     var btn = document.getElementById(buttonName);
     if (btn != null)
     { 
        //If we find the button click it
        btn.click();
        ev.preventDefault(); 
     }
  }
}

Your HTML should then look like this:

<input type="button" id="submit" value="Search"/>
<input type="text" name="search" id="search" />
share|improve this answer
2  
The fact the OP is using event handler attributes is irrelevant to the question, and asserting that the OP shouldn't do so is dogmatic. It's perfectly valid to use event handler attributes and introduces no functional problems. –  Tim Down Dec 5 '10 at 11:49
    
didn't work! i made alert box function for testing purposes. document.getElementById('submit').onclick = getMsg(); but the alert box appears immediately when I open the page and when i click enter on IE but didn't work with Firefox also! –  Swell Dec 5 '10 at 13:28
    
@Swell you need to assign the function reference, not the invocation return value: document.getElementById('submit').on click = getMsg; –  Jacob Relkin Dec 5 '10 at 15:17
    
I will try this after half an hour. thank you Jacob –  Swell Dec 5 '10 at 15:37
    
yes this is work fine with Firefox but not with IE, I edited to work on IE, so can you edit your solution put this if(window.event) event.keyCode = 0 else ev.preventDefault(); Instead of just ev.preventDefault(); i want to set your solution as a correct one but can you please edit it first. –  Swell Dec 5 '10 at 16:32

Why not use a wrapper js framework like jQuery? It does all the cross-browser stuff for you. Just off the top of my head, this could work (still, you should probably verify):

jQuery(function(){
  jQuery(window).keyup( function(e){ 
    if (e.keyCode == 13) {
      // handle click logic here
    }
  });
});
share|improve this answer
    
For something simple, you don't need to include the entire jQuery framework... –  Warty Dec 5 '10 at 10:17

I'd suggest using the keydown event instead for this particular case, since it simplifies key detection: you can use keyCode in all browsers. Also, you're passing in the ID of the button you want to click but then not using it, so I've changed that. Also, I've added a return false to prevent the default behaviour of pressing the enter key, (although this part won't have any effect in Opera: you'll need to suppress the keypress event instead in that browser):

function doClick(buttonId, e)
    {
    if (e.keyCode == 13)
        {
        // Get the button the user wants to have clicked
        var btn = document.getElementById(buttonId);
        if (btn)
        {
            btn.click();
            return false;
        }
    }

}

share|improve this answer
    
Down but not up? I've always found release to have a more intuitive feel. Is this just your preference or is there an actual performance boost? (are some browsers better/faster with down than up?) –  cwallenpoole Dec 5 '10 at 12:13
    
@cwallenpoole: The reason I went with keydown was to keep the same user experience as in the question: the OP was using keypress, which fires immediately after keydown. Also, it agrees with the native browser behaviour of submitting a form when the user presses the Enter key, which is triggered when the key is pressed rather than when it's released. –  Tim Down Dec 5 '10 at 15:21
    
I forgot about the .click() method and that forms submit on enter down not enter up. Thanks, this really helped me out of a headache for the last hour. –  pqsk Sep 12 '13 at 17:25

onKeydown

if (event.keyCode == 13) {
    document.getElementById('submit').click(); 
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer

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