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If you have an object with a property which has a retain setter, which of these is best practice?

1

-(id)init {
    if((self = [super init])) {
        self->_retainingProperty = [[NSObject alloc] init];
    }
    return self;
}

2

-(id)init {
    if((self = [super init])) {
        self.retainingProperty = [[NSObject alloc] init];
        [self.retainingProperty release];
    }
    return self;
}

3

-(id)init {
    if((self = [super init])) {
        NSObject *obj = [[NSObject alloc] init];
        self.retainingProperty = obj;
        [obj release];
    }
    return self;
}

All of these would be coupled with a release in dealloc

Perhaps there is another way I've missed.

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3 Answers 3

I generally just do:

- (id ) init
{
   self = [super init];

   if ( self )
   {
      retainingProperty = [[NSObject alloc] init];
   }

   return self;
}

I would not suggest #2 or #3, unless you are aware they might invoke KVO stuff that you do not intend.

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I think this is the way to go. However - if retainingProperty isn't changed again during the object lifetime, the property setter could just be the default assign instead. But in this case, the property still needs releasing in dealloc, which could lead to confusion... –  Nick Dec 5 '10 at 12:56

All of the above are fine and broadly equivalent. You can also access the member variable using just its name:

-(id)init {
    if((self = [super init])) {
          _retainingProperty = [[NSObject alloc] init];
    }
    return self;
}

Property setters are really just convenience methods to ensure the retain/release dance is done correctly, so if you are doing things correctly you can do without them.

If you've added some custom logic to the setter method, you may want to ensure it's called by always using the property setter syntax. Or alternatively, you may want to deliberately sidestep that logic in some instances, and therefore avoid using it some of the time. It's up to you - whatever works for your use case.

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At least two other ways immediately spring to mind. There's direct ivar access:

- (id) init
{
    if ( self = [super init] )
    {
        _retainingProperty = [[NSObject alloc] init];
    }
    return self;
}

Or you could use the autorelease pool:

- (id) init
{
    if ( self = [super init] )
    {
        self._retainingProperty = [[[NSObject alloc] init] autorelease];
    }
    return self;
}

Depending on the class of the property, there may also be convenience methods equivalent to the latter.

Personally, I would pretty much always go with the direct ivar access. It is usually considered bad form to call property accessors in init, because they may have side effects that you wouldn't want to happen while the object is incompletely initialised.

Similar considerations apply in dealloc, btw: it's better to release your ivars directly rather than using the property accessors.

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I considered the autorelease method. However, might this cause the object to hang around for longer than needed? –  Nick Dec 5 '10 at 13:03
1  
@Nick It might, but only if you're expecting to change it pretty soon. Given you're assigning it here to something that will retain it anyway, you probably expect it to stick around for a bit, no? So the automatic release will likely precede the object's own. In general, autorelease delays are not worth worrying about unless you're very space constrained or using very big objects. But I'm not really recommending it in this case, just observing that the possibility exists. –  walkytalky Dec 5 '10 at 13:09
    
Ok, thanks, understood. –  Nick Dec 5 '10 at 13:11

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