Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

As the title says, I'm looking for the fastest possible way to write integer arrays to files. The arrays will vary in size, and will realistically contain anywhere between 2500 and 25 000 000 ints.

Here's the code I'm presently using:

DataOutputStream writer = new DataOutputStream(new BufferedOutputStream(new FileOutputStream(filename)));

for (int d : data)
  writer.writeInt(d);

Given that DataOutputStream has a method for writing arrays of bytes, I've tried converting the int array to a byte array like this:

private static byte[] integersToBytes(int[] values) throws IOException {
    ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
    DataOutputStream dos = new DataOutputStream(baos);
    for (int i = 0; i < values.length; ++i) {
        dos.writeInt(values[i]);
    }

    return baos.toByteArray();
}

and like this:

private static byte[] integersToBytes2(int[] src) {
    int srcLength = src.length;
    byte[] dst = new byte[srcLength << 2];

    for (int i = 0; i < srcLength; i++) {
        int x = src[i];
        int j = i << 2;
        dst[j++] = (byte) ((x >>> 0) & 0xff);
        dst[j++] = (byte) ((x >>> 8) & 0xff);
        dst[j++] = (byte) ((x >>> 16) & 0xff);
        dst[j++] = (byte) ((x >>> 24) & 0xff);
    }
    return dst;
}

Both seem to give a minor speed increase, about 5%. I've not tested them rigorously enough to confirm that.

Are there any techniques that will speed up this file write operation, or relevant guides to best practice for Java IO write performance?

share|improve this question
2  
How do you want the file contents to be formatted, exactly? –  Karl Knechtel Dec 5 '10 at 12:55
    
Inlining the code yourself will make code which hasn't warmed up faster. However if you run the test for 5-10 seconds you will see if this has make a real improvement. (As he JVM will do this for you) –  Peter Lawrey Dec 5 '10 at 13:17
    
@Karl just a sequence of ints with no formatting. –  Ollie Glass Dec 5 '10 at 14:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I had a look at three options:

  1. Using DataOutputStream;
  2. Using ObjectOutputStream (for Serializable objects, which int[] is); and
  3. Using FileChannel.

The results are

DataOutputStream wrote 1,000,000 ints in 3,159.716 ms
ObjectOutputStream wrote 1,000,000 ints in 295.602 ms
FileChannel wrote 1,000,000 ints in 110.094 ms

So the NIO version is the fastest. It also has the advantage of allowing edits, meaning you can easily change one int whereas the ObjectOutputStream would require reading the entire array, modifying it and writing it out to file.

Code follows:

private static final int NUM_INTS = 1000000;

interface IntWriter {
  void write(int[] ints);
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
  int[] ints = new int[NUM_INTS];
  Random r = new Random();
  for (int i=0; i<NUM_INTS; i++) {
    ints[i] = r.nextInt();
  }
  time("DataOutputStream", new IntWriter() {
    public void write(int[] ints) {
      storeDO(ints);
    }
  }, ints);
  time("ObjectOutputStream", new IntWriter() {
    public void write(int[] ints) {
      storeOO(ints);
    }
  }, ints);
  time("FileChannel", new IntWriter() {
    public void write(int[] ints) {
      storeFC(ints);
    }
  }, ints);
}

private static void time(String name, IntWriter writer, int[] ints) {
  long start = System.nanoTime();
  writer.write(ints);
  long end = System.nanoTime();
  double ms = (end - start) / 1000000d;
  System.out.printf("%s wrote %,d ints in %,.3f ms%n", name, ints.length, ms);
}

private static void storeOO(int[] ints) {
  ObjectOutputStream out = null;
  try {
    out = new ObjectOutputStream(new FileOutputStream("object.out"));
    out.writeObject(ints);
  } catch (IOException e) {
    throw new RuntimeException(e);
  } finally {
    safeClose(out);
  }
}

private static void storeDO(int[] ints) {
  DataOutputStream out = null;
  try {
    out = new DataOutputStream(new FileOutputStream("data.out"));
    for (int anInt : ints) {
      out.write(anInt);
    }
  } catch (IOException e) {
    throw new RuntimeException(e);
  } finally {
    safeClose(out);
  }
}

private static void storeFC(int[] ints) {
  FileOutputStream out = null;
  try {
    out = new FileOutputStream("fc.out");
    FileChannel file = out.getChannel();
    ByteBuffer buf = file.map(FileChannel.MapMode.READ_WRITE, 0, 4 * ints.length);
    for (int i : ints) {
      buf.putInt(i);
    }
    file.close();
  } catch (IOException e) {
    throw new RuntimeException(e);
  } finally {
    safeClose(out);
  }
}

private static void safeClose(OutputStream out) {
  try {
    if (out != null) {
      out.close();
    }
  } catch (IOException e) {
    // do nothing
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice tests, but I get an error with the FileChannel: java.nio.channels.NonReadableChannelException. Do you know why? –  Ollie Glass Dec 5 '10 at 14:44
1  
I used @dacwe's method to write to the FileChannel, modified code is here pastebin.com/HhpcS7HX –  Ollie Glass Dec 5 '10 at 14:58
    
i get the same exception, an idea why anyone? –  steveh Apr 1 '13 at 11:26
1  
The problem is the code tries to read and write from a write-only object; FileOutputStream supports only writing. Instead, the code should use a RandomAccessFile opened with "rw" instead. –  MikeB May 19 '13 at 4:09

I would use FileChannel from the nio package and ByteBuffer. This approach seems (on my computer) give 2 to 4 times better write performance:

Output from program:

normal time: 2555
faster time: 765

This is the program:

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {

        // create a test buffer
        ByteBuffer buffer = createBuffer();

        long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        {
            // do the first test (the normal way of writing files)
            normalToFile(new File("first"), buffer.asIntBuffer());
        }
        long middle = System.currentTimeMillis(); 
        {
            // use the faster nio stuff
            fasterToFile(new File("second"), buffer);
        }
        long done = System.currentTimeMillis();

        // print the result
        System.out.println("normal time: " + (middle - start));
        System.out.println("faster time: " + (done - middle));
    }

    private static void fasterToFile(File file, ByteBuffer buffer) 
    throws IOException {

        FileChannel fc = null;

        try {

            fc = new FileOutputStream(file).getChannel();
            fc.write(buffer);

        } finally {

            if (fc != null)
                fc.close();

            buffer.rewind();
        }
    }

    private static void normalToFile(File file, IntBuffer buffer) 
    throws IOException {

        DataOutputStream writer = null;

        try {
            writer = 
                new DataOutputStream(new BufferedOutputStream(
                        new FileOutputStream(file)));

            while (buffer.hasRemaining())
                writer.writeInt(buffer.get());

        } finally {
            if (writer != null)
                writer.close();

            buffer.rewind();
        }
    }

    private static ByteBuffer createBuffer() {
        ByteBuffer buffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(4 * 25000000);
        Random r = new Random(1);

        while (buffer.hasRemaining()) 
            buffer.putInt(r.nextInt());

        buffer.rewind();

        return buffer;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can you re-test using a direct memory buffer? That should make the write faster (as it has to copy to a direct buffer otherwise) –  Peter Lawrey Dec 5 '10 at 14:01
    
Also try a BufferOutputStream with 64K buffer size –  Peter Lawrey Dec 5 '10 at 14:01
    
Thanks, the FileChannel approach is much faster. –  Ollie Glass Dec 5 '10 at 14:59

I think you should consider using file channels (the java.nio library) instead of plain streams (java.io). A good starting point is this interesting discussion: Java NIO FileChannel versus FileOutputstream performance / usefulness

and the relevant comments below.

Cheers!

share|improve this answer

The main improvement you can have for writing int[] is to either;

  • increase the buffer size. The size is right for most stream, but file access can be faster with a larger buffer. This could yield a 10-20% improvement.

  • Use NIO and a direct buffer. This allows you to write 32-bit values without converting to bytes. This may yield a 5% improvement.

BTW: You should be able to write at least 10 million int values per second. With disk caching you increase this to 200 million per second.

share|improve this answer

Array is Serializable - can't you just use writer.writeObject(data);? That's definitely going to be faster than individual writeInt calls.

If you have other requirements on the output data format than retrieval into int[], that's a different question.

share|improve this answer
1  
writeObject has significant overhead and uses writeInt in the end. It is much friendly way to write objects and I suspect is a better choice in most situations. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 5 '10 at 13:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.