Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Possible Duplicate:
Factor a large number efficiently with gmp

I know I already posted it, but people misunderstood what I meant, and until I fixed it the post died.
What I need is a way to efficiently factor(find prime factors of a number) large numbers(may get to 2048 bits) using C++ and GMP(Gnu Multiple Precession lib) or less preferably any other way.
The numbers are practically random so there is little chance it will be hard to factor, and even if the number is hard to factor, I can re-roll the number(can't choose though).
How do I do it?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Konrad Rudolph, middaparka, ybungalobill, Don Roby, Yacoby Dec 5 '10 at 14:32

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Oh, please let us know if you manage to do this. Because if you do then you have essentially broken all forms of public/private key encryption regardless of the exact algorithm. Goodbye ssl, goodbye ssh and more importantly goodbye encrypted military communications. – slebetman Dec 5 '10 at 14:18
4  
Posts don’t die on Stack Overflow. The question is still there. So what’s the problem? – Konrad Rudolph Dec 5 '10 at 14:18
1  
Those of you who are telling the OP that this is impossible are not reading the question. It is a random number, not a number of the type used in cryptography (where those numbers are a product of 2 large primes). A random number has a 50% chance of being a factor of 2, a 33% chance of being a factor of 3, a 20% chance of being a factor of 5, etc., and is much more likely to be factored quickly than a cryptographic product of 2 large primes. – Jason S Dec 5 '10 at 14:28
2  
@Jason: You are misunderstanding how cryptographically large numbers are generated. The two large primes are generated by sampling large, randomly generated numbers and checking if they are prime. You may be able to quickly factor out the 2s, 3s and 5s, but it will still take a long time to find the larger prime factors, like 27644437. If we're talking 2048-bit numbers then it is reasonable to expect some large prime factors. – Cameron Skinner Dec 5 '10 at 14:33
1  
@Cameron: OP has said nothing about the random numbers being cryptographic keys. If I understand the OP's post, it is to keep generating large random numbers until one is found that can be factored. If I were doing this, I would test for division with small primes, then test the remaining factors for probable primality, and if not prime then I'd run a number sieve for some max time T, and if I can't factor completely, then get the next random number and repeat. – Jason S Dec 5 '10 at 14:45
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Have you tried the quadratic sieve or the general number field sieve? (QS simpler and easier to implement, GNFS faster for very large numbers, but your numbers may not be large enough for GNFS to be much faster than QS)

edit: According to a paper by Eric Landquist, the crossover point between QS and GNFS is about 110 digits = approx 365 bits.

share|improve this answer

There is no efficient way (probably). This assumption is the basis of modern cryptography.

share|improve this answer
    
Please explain the downvote. It may not please anyone, but that is the answer. – Konrad Rudolph Dec 5 '10 at 14:21
    
-1: "efficient" is not meaningful in this context without quantitative specification from the OP, who may be fine with days or weeks runtime. – Jason S Dec 5 '10 at 14:24
    
You're also ignoring the OP's comment: "The numbers are practically random so there is little chance it will be hard to factor" – Jason S Dec 5 '10 at 14:25
    
@Jason: that’s not the way I’m reading the question (pretty certain the OP would have specified if he was aware of the hardness of the problem, to avoid confusion, in particular since “efficient” in computer science pretty much implies sub-exponential) – but fair enough. – Konrad Rudolph Dec 5 '10 at 14:26
1  
@Jason: "The numbers are practically random so there is little chance it will be hard to factor" is a little suspect. RSA key generation is done with practically random numbers (albeit with the low bit always set to 1). – Cameron Skinner Dec 5 '10 at 14:27

Why do you think it will not be hard to factor? Yes, there will be some small factors. But the rest will be large enough in a number of that size that it will often take some serious work to factor.

I would suggest trial divisions by some small primes to get the small fish out of the pond. Then you might try Pollard's rho method, but I doubt it has a chance on numbers with that many bits. Better would be a quadratic sieve.

share|improve this answer

If i am not missing anything This is known to be a "difficult" problem. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integer_factorization. i.e. it is currently impossible.

share|improve this answer

There is no known way to efficiently factor large numbers. See Wikipedia for a discussion of why and the state of the art.

As the comments have pointed out, the difficulty of this problem is the basis of much modern cryptography, particularly public-key encryption.

What you could do is store a table of small primes and work through that table dividing your large number by each candidate prime as it goes. If the number is "too hard" (i.e. you run out of small primes) then re-roll.

share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvotes (for this and similar answers)? You asked for an efficient method to factor large numbers. There is no such method. Just because you don't like the reality of the situation is no reason to downvote a correct answer. – Cameron Skinner Dec 5 '10 at 14:24
    
You're ignoring the OP's comment:"The numbers are practically random so there is little chance it will be hard to factor" – Jason S Dec 5 '10 at 14:26
    
@Jason: "The numbers are practically random so there is little chance it will be hard to factor" is a little suspect. RSA key generation is done with practically random numbers (albeit with the low bit always set to 1). – Cameron Skinner Dec 5 '10 at 14:29
    
@Cameron: No. You're misinterpreting. RSA key generation is done with practically random numbers to purposefully generate primes. Then the two primes are multiplied together to produce a very-hard-to-factor composite. – Jason S Dec 5 '10 at 14:31
    
@Jason: I believe you are misunderstanding RSA key generation; you clearly believe I misunderstand it. The point is that RSA tests large random numbers for primality, which is exactly equivalent to factorisation. It does this twice, then multiplies them to get a non-prime key. – Cameron Skinner Dec 5 '10 at 14:37

A way of doing this efficiently will break many the currently in use encryption algorithms.
This is an NPC problem, so....

share|improve this answer
    
You're ignoring the OP's comment:"The numbers are practically random so there is little chance it will be hard to factor" – Jason S Dec 5 '10 at 14:27
    
@Jason: "The numbers are practically random so there is little chance it will be hard to factor" is a little suspect. RSA key generation is done with practically random numbers (albeit with the low bit always set to 1). – Cameron Skinner Dec 5 '10 at 14:28

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.