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I want to invoke eventX every day at 14:30,how to do this kind of job in actionscript 3?

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The Adobe AS3 Alarm Clock example should tell you all you need to know. In particular, the setAlarm method will be of interest.

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How to compile it into a swc file so that I can use it directly in my flex project? – fms Dec 5 '10 at 16:04
    
You'd just use the code in your flex project. Why would you want to package this as a swc? – spender Dec 5 '10 at 23:45

You can use the date object EDIT it was suggested that flash might freeze for a second causing the event not to fire. This is valid - I've updated it so this is no longer a problem.

var currDate:Date = new Date();

var targetHour:int = 14;
var targetMinute:int = 30;

var startHour:int = currDate.getHours();
var startMinute:int = currDate.getMinutes();

var eventTriggered:Boolean = false;

// you can use an enterframe or a timer event here, doesn't matter which
addEventListener(Event.ENTER_FRAME, onCheckTime);

function onCheckTime(evt:Event):void{
  currDate = new Date();

  var hours:int = currDate.getHours();
  var minutes:int = currDate.getMinutes();

  // in order for this not to work flash would need to freeze for an entire minute
  // not likely 
  if (hours == 14 && minutes == 30){
     trigger();
  }

  // if flash froze for a whole minute
  if (!eventTriggered){
    if (startHour <= targetHour && startMinute < targetMinute){
      if (hours > targetHour && minutes > targetMinute){
        trigger();
      }
    }
  }
}
function trigger():void{
  // do anything you want here
  eventTriggered = true;
  dispatchEvent(new Event("eventX"));
  removeEventListener(Event.ENTER_FRAME, onCheckTime);
}
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If for some reason the flash player went unresponsive right before the time check, it could skip it. Might want to put some logic in there so if it has skipped it, it will still be able to act. – AttackingHobo Dec 5 '10 at 17:59
    
thats unlikely especially if you use dispatchEvent() - if the flash player became unresponsive it would still do the dispatchEvent() when it was done being unresponsive - that said, adding logic to just incase is easy. I don't have time to add it now, but I'll come back later and update my answer. – Zevan Dec 5 '10 at 18:04
    
Your method is unreliable because as AHobo says, there's no guarantee that any timing event will fire when hours==14, minutes==30 and seconds==0. It's entirely possible that a timing event (be it timer or enterframe) will fire at 14:29.59 then at 14:30.01 skipping your logic altogether. The spec does not (and cannot) guarantee an event at any precise time, and although unlikely, AHobo's scenario make this a bad solution. -1 – spender Dec 5 '10 at 23:44
1  
I gave you an upvote, no need to be rude to people pointing out potential problems. Would you like me to downvote next time and not leave a reason? – AttackingHobo Dec 6 '10 at 6:11
1  
The reason I did not attempt to fix your code is because there is a simpler, more reliable means of acheiving the same end. Polling the clock is inefficient, and the Flash runtime offers a means of scheduling events at an arbitrary time in the future. As such calculating the delta time between desired event time and now and setting a one-shot Timer for that interval creates a more reliable and efficient means of scheduling an event which Flash will deliver as close as possible to the required time without requiring any further checking. – spender Dec 6 '10 at 9:34

Using Date() as a trigger point for a repeating event is unreliable for the reasons mentioned and also because the Date class is tied the the local machine's time, which can be changed by the user. While unlikely, the user could change the date on the local machine, never allowing it to reach the target date.

However, if you were to use Date(), I might approach it like the following, which would give you a full minute (or whatever you set the timeOutLength variable to), to have trigger() called. The else block calls trigger() if the trigger window is somehow passed without trigger() getting called. The rest of the functions create a waiting period until the trigger window has expired, and then rolls the date forward one day and restarts the process.

var timeOutLength:Number = 1;
var minutesToWaitUntilReset:Number = timeOutLength + 1;
var hasBeenTriggered:Boolean = false;

var targetHour:Number = 2;
var targetMinute:Number = 38;

var currentYear:Number = new Date().getFullYear()
var currentMonth:Number = new Date().getMonth();
var currentDay:Number = new Date().getDate();

addEventListener(Event.ENTER_FRAME, onCheckTime);

function onCheckTime(evt:Event):void
{
    var currentDate = new Date().getTime();
    var targetDate = new Date(currentYear, currentMonth, currentDay, targetHour, targetMinute).getTime();
    var timeOutDate = new Date(currentYear, currentMonth, currentDay, targetHour, (targetMinute + timeOutLength)).getTime();

    if (currentDate >= targetDate && currentDate < timeOutDate && hasBeenTriggered == false)
    {
        tiggerDailyEvent();
    }
    else if(currentDate >= timeOutDate && hasBeenTriggered == false)
    {
        tiggerDailyEvent();
    }
}

function tiggerDailyEvent():void
{
    hasBeenTriggered = true;
    removeEventListener(Event.ENTER_FRAME, onCheckTime);
    addEventListener(Event.ENTER_FRAME, waitForReset);

    // this is where you call your daily event
}

function waitForReset(evt:Event):void
{
    var currentYear = new Date().getFullYear();
    var currentMonth = new Date().getMonth();
    var currentDay = new Date().getDate();

    var currentDate = new Date().getTime();
    var resetDate = new Date(currentYear, currentMonth, currentDay, targetHour, (targetMinute + timeOutLength + minutesToWaitUntilReset)).getTime();

    if(currentDate >= resetDate)
    {
        removeEventListener(Event.ENTER_FRAME, waitForReset);
        reset();
    }
}

function reset():void
{
    hasBeenTriggered = false;

    currentYear = new Date().getFullYear();
    currentMonth = new Date().getMonth();
    currentDay = new Date().getDate() + 1;

    addEventListener(Event.ENTER_FRAME, onCheckTime);
}
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