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Here is a function that writes n bits to a binary file.

Parameters:

  • Data : Bit sequence to be written to file (lsb on the right)
  • Length: Number of bits to write
  • OutFile: Destination file.

First version of the funcion:

void WriteBitsToFile(unsigned long long Data, unsigned Length, std::ofstream & OutFile) {
    static unsigned long long BitBuffer = 0;
    static unsigned BitCounter = 0;

    for (unsigned i = Length; i --; ) {
        (BitBuffer <<= 1) |= ((Data >> i) & 0x1);
        BitCounter ++;

        if (BitCounter == 64) {
            OutFile.write((char *) & BitBuffer, sizeof(BitBuffer));
            BitCounter = 0;
        }
    }
}

Second version:

void WriteBitsToFile(unsigned long long Data, unsigned Length, std::ofstream & OutFile) {
    static unsigned long long BitBuffer = 0;
    static unsigned FreeBitCounter = sizeof(BitBuffer) << 3;

    Data &= (1 << Length) - 1;

    if (FreeBitCounter > Length) {
        BitBuffer |= (Data << (FreeBitCounter -= Length));
    } else if (FreeBitCounter < Length) {
        BitBuffer |= (Data >> (Length -= FreeBitCounter));
        OutFile.write((char *) & BitBuffer, sizeof(BitBuffer));
        BitBuffer = Data << ((sizeof(BitBuffer) << 3) - Length);
        FreeBitCounter = (sizeof(BitBuffer) << 3) - Length;
    } else {
        BitBuffer |= Data;
        OutFile.write((char *) & BitBuffer, sizeof(BitBuffer));
        BitBuffer = 0; FreeBitCounter = (sizeof(BitBuffer) << 3);
    }
}

Both of them do the job, but second one is faster then first. Any idea to make it even faster?

Thank you all for help!

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  1. I would start with removing static variables from your function body. They are a bit slower as should test their state (already initialized or not) on every function call. Just move them out of function scope.

  2. Why do you use such short buffer? Are you sure you need to write every unsigned long long into the file? I would suggest using something like unsigned char buffer[1024].

  3. Then you should think how to get rid of other "if statements".

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. I need static variables to retain the BitBuffer value between calls. BitBuffer has to be written to file only when it is full. I'll have a try using a longer buffer. I'll need more code for this. Any problem in using unsigned long long buffer[1024]? Also I'll need some code to flush the buffer when job is done but I have not reached 1024. It could be some like 'if (Length == 0) then flush' –  Danilo Brambilla Dec 5 '10 at 16:01
2  
Re: "removing static variables from your function body. They are a bit slower as should test their state (already initialized or not) on every function call". That's only true for static variables that have a complex initialiser (e.g. a function call). But in the given example, the compiler can calculate the initial values at compile time, so it'll put them into the initialized data segment. So there's no "already initialized" check. –  user9876 Dec 5 '10 at 16:47
    
To complete @user comment: and this cost is nothing comparing to write call. @Danilo use larger char buffer (and not long, because it will be difficult to handle in the last flush operation). –  ruslik Dec 5 '10 at 20:08

Instead of the write() call, try the following:

OutFile.rdbuf()->sputn((char *) & BitBuffer, sizeof(BitBuffer));
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Opening the file is likely to be far slower that writing to it. In your design are you minimizing the file open calls?

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Thank you for you answer. File is opened and closed only once in the whole program. –  Danilo Brambilla Dec 5 '10 at 15:58

if I understand you correctly, you want to write length lower bits of the unsigned long long integer you receive. You can save looping through the input bits by masking the required bits:

unsigned long long mask = (1ull << length) - 1; // creates a mask of 'length' 1's
BitBuffer = Data & mask;

as a remark, I don't see why your test and writing is inside the loop, in the first version.

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Thank you for your answer. You are right about what the function do. Test and write inside the loop is needed because BitBuffer has to be written only when if is full –  Danilo Brambilla Dec 5 '10 at 15:57
    
@Danilo Brambilla: oh, I see, you call this function multiple times and flush the buffer to file only when it's full? If so then indeed, as mentioned by @user9876, it would be helpful if you said so. How do you ensure that the last chunk gets written, in case the buffer is not yet full? –  davka Dec 5 '10 at 16:03
    
At the end of the program I'll call the function with Data = 0 and Length = 64 to force write of the last chunk ending eventually with a 0 sequence :-) –  Danilo Brambilla Dec 5 '10 at 16:10

First of all, you need to write the code so it's understandable. I can't easily understand either of your code fragments. Here's an attempt to reformat and refactor the first one to be simpler, and add some comments:

/**
 * @brief Write some bits to a file.
 *
 * The bits are written MSB-first to a temporary 64-bit integer, which is
 * then written to the file in host byte-order.
 *
 * @param Data The data to write to the file.  Only the least-significant
 *             Length bits are written.  Of the bits that are written, the
 *             most significant bit is written first.
 * @param Length The length of the data to write, in bits.  Must be <= 64.
 * @param OutFile The file to write to
 *
 * @note This function is not thread-safe
 * @note This function stores some state in a static variable.  You must
 *       ensure that the total data written is a multiple of 64 bits, or
 *       some data will be lost.  You can only switch from one OutFile to
 *       another on a 64-bit boundry.
 */
void WriteBitsToFile(unsigned long long Data,
                     unsigned Length,
                     std::ofstream & OutFile)
{
   static unsigned long long BitBuffer = 0;
   static unsigned BitCounter = 0; 

   // Loop through input bits, one bit at a time
   for (int i = (int)Length; i >= 0; --i)
   {
      // Get the input bit
      unsigned long long NextBit = ((Data >> i) & 1);

      // Add it to the temporary buffer
      BitBuffer = ((BitBuffer << 1) | NextBit);
      BitCounter++;

      // If the temporary buffer is full, write it out
      if (BitCounter == 64)
      {
         OutFile.write((char *) & BitBuffer, sizeof(BitBuffer));
         BitCounter = 0;
      }
   }
}

Now that I understand what you're trying to do...

Your second version looks much better, because you're avoiding the per-bit loop. Since you're asking about optimizing this, I assume you have profiling results that show that this is slow? And I assume you're putting a lot of data through this?

One possible optimization is to write into a much bigger buffer (I'd suggest at least 4kB). That means you don't need to call write() as often. Calling write() can be relatively slow.

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your suggested optimization is very true in general, but here the input data is one unsigned long long integer, so there is no need to accumulate the output data (and also to reset the buffer as done in OP) –  davka Dec 5 '10 at 15:42
    
Sorry for not commented code. I am actually putting sometimes more then 40 MB this way inside the file. I'll have a try with a bigger buffer. –  Danilo Brambilla Dec 5 '10 at 16:05

Here's one way to do it with a bigger buffer. (in Pseudo-C#)

const int wordSz= sizeof(unsigned long long)*8;

void WriteBitsToFile(unsigned long long Data, unsigned Length, std::ofstream & OutFile) { 
   static unsigned long long BitBuffer[BUFSZ+1] ={0};  
   static unsigned bitsSoFar = 0;

   Data &= (1 << Length) - 1; 
   int index = bitsSoFar/wordSz;
   int offset = bitsSoFar - (index*wordSz);
   BitBuffer[index]|=Data<<offset;
   int remainder = offset+length-wordSz;
   if (remainder > 0)
   {
      index++;
      BitBuffer[index]=Data>>(length-remainder);
   }
   bitsSoFar+=length;
   if (bitsPacked > BUFSZ*wordSz)
   {
      OutFile.write((char*)BitBuffer, BUFSZ*sizeof(unsigned long long));
      bitsSoFar-=BUFSZ*wordSz;
      BitBuffer[0]=BitBuffer[BUFSZ];
   }
}
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