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<script type="text/javascript">
$("document").ready(function() {
 $("button").click(function() {
 $("[src$='.jpg']").slideToggle(1000);
  })
  }
)
</script>
<img src="http://images2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20101129232634/callofduty/images/2/2e/Pripyat.jpg">
<button>Click me</button>

is same like

<script type="text/javascript">
$("document").ready(function() {
 $("button").click(function() {
 $("img [src$='.jpg']").toggle(1000);
  })
  }
)
</script>
<img src="http://images2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20101129232634/callofduty/images/2/2e/Pripyat.jpg">
<button>Click me</button>

So is there really any difference?

share|improve this question

It should be pointed out however that there is a difference in the animation, albeit a small one: .toggle() will slide the element from the top left corner, whereas .slideToggle will slide it from top to bottom.

You can see an example for both effects on this fiddle.

share|improve this answer

.toggle():

Display or hide the matched elements.

.slideToggle():

Display or hide the matched elements with a sliding motion.


With your usage, you will not see a difference.

The jQuery documentation site is very good and should be the first place to look for this kind of question.

share|improve this answer
1  
Also see, .fadeToggle() – Paul Creasey Dec 5 '10 at 14:52
    
Can you expand on why in his particular usage he'll see no difference? I'm looking for this answer too. Thanks – i-CONICA Jan 4 '12 at 22:06
    
@i-CONICA - Nothing different is done when either of these is called. The only parameter passed is the duration without anything else, the default behaviour will be identical. – Oded Jan 5 '12 at 9:33

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