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Easy and possible stupid question. Im reading a C# book (im trying to learn it, coming from a C/C++ background)

Anyways in like the sample console applications. Like lets say Hello World.

is like so

static void Program()
{
   Console.WriteLine("Herro World");
   Console.WriteLine();
}

why exactly is their a second "WriteLine". Also whats the difference between Console.Write and Console.WriteLine. Im assuming Console.Writeline supports stuff like {0}, myint and such?

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This question is like 4 months old and you decided to come back and downvote it? Lol –  Mercfh Feb 25 '11 at 15:27

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What I normally see is not a second WriteLine, but:

Console.ReadLine();

So, usually something like this:

static void Program()
{
   Console.WriteLine("Herro World");
   Console.ReadLine();
}

This waits for the user to press enter before existing the program, allowing one to see the output from previous commands.


To answer your question:

Console.WriteLine();

Simply outputs an empty line. In the example program, in terms of functionality it appears to add very little.

The WriteLine methods has many overrides - for different primitive types such as int, double and bool as well as more advanced format strings (as in your question, supporting {0} string format placeholder notation.

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The second WriteLine is merely adding a blank line. If you were to have

Console.WriteLine("A");
Console.WriteLine();
Console.WriteLine("B");

You could have

A

B

written to the screen.

The difference between Write and WriteLine is that WriteLine will provide a new line after your text and Write will not.. So if you have

Console.Write("A");
Console.Write("B");

Your output will simply be

AB
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Console.WriteLine("Hi!"); == Console.Write("Hi!\n");

That's all there is to them, both apply String.Format on the parameter

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You should put two equals signs ;) –  Oskar Kjellin Dec 5 '10 at 15:39
    
Neh, 2 are used for comparison, not assignment ;) –  Machinarius Dec 5 '10 at 22:00
    
And isn't that comparison? –  Oskar Kjellin Dec 6 '10 at 9:33
    
@Oskar Ok you win! :p –  Machinarius Dec 6 '10 at 13:08

The second line just puts an empty line. Sort of like you hit enter.

The Console.WriteLine will put an enter after your line while the Console.Write won't. So with Console.WriteLine you can append an existing line.

They both support the same formatting methods

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Oh you mean like a newline or \n for C++ normally? –  Mercfh Dec 5 '10 at 15:29
1  
@Merchf Yeah, basically. And like Oded pointed out it is likely that it actually says Console.Readline(), which waits for you to press enter –  Oskar Kjellin Dec 5 '10 at 15:31
1  
Yes, Console.WriteLine appends Environment.NewLine to the end of the output. Environment.NewLine is "\r\n" on Windows. –  Tergiver Dec 5 '10 at 15:31

I presume it's to make sure there's two \n's in the output.

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The second WriteLine merely adds a blank line.

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