Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hi I have the following code

expression :: String →  Maybe Expr
expression s =   case parse expr s' of
      Just (a,"") →  Just a
      _           →  Nothing
    where s' = filter (λx →  x ≠ ' ') s

expr, term, factor, num, sin', cos' :: Parser Expr
num    = dbl' +++ int'

expr   = chain term '+' Add

term   = chain factor '*' Mul



func = sin' +++ cos'

var' = do
       char 'x'
       return (Var "x")

int' = do n ←  int
          return (Num (fromIntegral n))

dbl' = do n ←  int
   char '.'
   n' ←  oneOrMore number
   let c = ((show n) ⊕ "." ⊕ n')
   return (Dbl (read c))

sin' = do char 's'
   char 'i'
          char 'n'
   e ←  factor
          return (Sin e)

And the compiler says that the following is not in scope "chain", "int" "number"

Why are the compiler complaining on these commands, isn't chain, int and number well known names?

EDIT

If you where to use the following parser, how would you solve the problem?

module Parsing
 ( Parser,parse,
  success,failure,sat,pmap,char,digit,
  (+++),(<:>),(>*>),(>->),(<-<),
  oneOrMore,zeroOrMore
 )

where

import Data.Maybe
import Data.Char

------------------



-------------------
-- Basic Parsers, dependent on internal structure --
-- success and fail
failure    = P $ \s -> Nothing
success a  = P $ \s -> Just (a,s)

-- Parse any single character
item  =  P $ \s -> case s of
               []     -> Nothing
               (c:cs) -> Just (c,cs)

-- (+++)  parse either using p or else using q
infixr 5 +++
(+++) :: Parser a -> Parser a -> Parser a

p +++ q  = P $ \s -> listToMaybe [ x | Just x <- [parse p s, parse q s]]

-- (p >*> f) parse using p to produce a.
-- Then parse using f a

infixl 1 >*>

(>*>) :: Parser a -> (a -> Parser b) -> Parser b

p >*> f  = P $ \s ->
            case parse p s of
                    Just(a,s') -> parse (f a) s'
                    _          -> Nothing

-----------------------------------------------


-- pmap modifies the result of a parser
pmap :: (a -> b) -> Parser a -> Parser b
pmap f p = p >*> success . f

p >-> q = p >*> \_ -> q  -- equivalent to monadic op: >>
p <-< q = p >*> \a -> q >-> success a


(<:>):: Parser a -> Parser [a] -> Parser [a]
p <:> q = p >*> \a -> pmap (a:) q
share|improve this question
    
It looks like your indentation is broken in the end. Also, is this Parsec code? –  delnan Dec 5 '10 at 15:36

2 Answers 2

(What version of parsec are you using?)

There's no chain, int, or number provided by Parsec 2.x or Parsec 3.x, though these would be simple to write.

chain term op cons = sepBy1 expr (char op) >>= return . foldr1 cons
int = many1 digit >>= return . read
number = digit

(Untested, and I'm just guessing at the intent of your code.)


Cute little parser combinator library there. Is this homework or something?

punva grez bc pbaf = cznc (sbyqe1 pbaf) $ grez <:> mrebBeZber (pune bc >-> grez)
vag = cznc ernq $ barBeZber qvtvg
share|improve this answer
    
Solved it, thanks guys =) –  jakob Dec 6 '10 at 1:45

It seems that you are using some sort of parsing library like Parsec, or the parser module from "programming in Haskell." You need to import the one you are using.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.