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function map(f, a) {
  for(var i in a) {
    a[i] = f(a[i]);
  }
}

var a = [0, 1, 2, 3];
map(function(x) { return x = x * x }, a);
console.log(a);

a: [0, 1, 4, 9]

However, If I change map(f, a) to:

function map(f, a) {
  for(var i in a) {
    f(a[i]);
  }
}
var a = [0, 1, 2, 3];
map(function(x) { return x = x * x }, a);
console.log(a);

a remains unchanged as: [0, 1, 2, 3]

I'm not sure what's happening here. It appears as if the interpreter considers a[i] as a reference to a property of the object a in map(f, a) but once passed into f it turns into a typeof number.

share|improve this question
2  
What do you expect? –  delnan Dec 5 '10 at 15:51
    
I expect a to change in the second example. –  Sahil Muthoo Dec 5 '10 at 15:54
    
That would require pretty extreme call-by-reference - which doesn't exist in JS (just try var x = 0; function f(x) { x = 1 }; f(x)). You are throwing the result of f(a[i]) away! –  delnan Dec 5 '10 at 16:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Don't use for(... in...) on Arrays. Use a for loop.

Enumeration order with for in is NOT guaranteed. It will also iterate over properties (not the built ins but stuff that were set by JS code) and stuff on the prototype, and then all hell breaks loose.

Next thing, all values except for arrays and objects are pass by value (basically arrays and objects are also pass by value, but the value is a pointer to the object).

So you're not modifying the value inside the array in this case, but the local variable x which just happens to have them same value.

return x = x * x the assignment is superfluous.

Fixed version

function map(f, a) {
  for(var i = 0, l = a.length; i < l; i++) {
    a[i] = f(a[i]);
  }
}

var a = [0, 1, 2, 3];
map(function(x) { return x * x }, a);
console.log(a);
share|improve this answer
    
Array.prototype.foo = 2; for(var i in [])console.log(i) > 'foo' - Updated my wording to state it more clear, everything that's enumerable will get listed. –  Ivo Wetzel Dec 5 '10 at 15:58
    
I have no means of testing now but I'll take your word for it. –  Alin Purcaru Dec 5 '10 at 15:59
    
I used for in since I didn't modify a in any way. –  Sahil Muthoo Dec 5 '10 at 16:06
    
@Sahil Your code will break as soon as someone else modifies Array.prototype, infamous example being the widely used Prototype.js library. Always use a for loop for arrays. It's more secure, and a thousand times faster too. –  Ivo Wetzel Dec 5 '10 at 16:08
    
A thousand times faster? Really? –  Tim Down Dec 5 '10 at 16:29

This is correct behavior, it's the value of a[i] is passed into f([i]), not the reference to it, so that x inside is a distinctly different variable/reference.

In the first version you're taking the result of that still different x (returned by the function) and assigning it to that array position afterwards...that's the only way to use that new value for something.

share|improve this answer

This call:

a[i] = f(a[i]);

is actually similar to this:

var arg = a[i];
var res = f(arg);
a[i] = res;

This is called "call-by-value", see here:

share|improve this answer

Arrays in JavaScript are Objects, and Objects are always reference types.

Up to the point where a exists inside the map function you have been passing it as an entire array which means that changes you make to a will be visible externally.

Once you de-reference the array with a[i] you have a variable of type Number which is not a reference type. Therefore, changes to x in your anonymous function will not be propagated back to the array, and are only visible inside the anonymous function itself.

share|improve this answer
    
That's what I assumed. Thanks. –  Sahil Muthoo Dec 5 '10 at 16:04

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