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In Objective-C, is it necessary to override all inherited constructors of a subclass to add custom initialization logic?

For example, would the following be correct for a UIView subclass with custom initialization logic?

@implementation CustomUIView

- (id)init {
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        [self initHelper];
    }
    return self;
}

- (id)initWithFrame:(CGRect)theFrame {
    self = [super initWithFrame:theFrame];
    if (self) {
        [self initHelper];
    }
    return self;
}

- (id)initWithCoder:(NSCoder *)decoder {
    self = [super initWithCoder:decoder];
    if (self) {
        [self initHelper];
    }
    return self;
}

- (void) initHelper {
    // Custom initialization
}

@end
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2 Answers 2

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Every Cocoa Touch (and Cocoa) class has a designated initializer; for UIView, as stated in this documentation, that method is initWithFrame:. In this particular case, you'll only need to override initWithFrame; all other calls will cascade down and hit this method, eventually.

This goes beyond the scope of the question, but if you do end up creating a custom initializer with extra parameters, you should make sure to the designated initializer for the superclass when assigning self, like this:

- (id)initWithFrame:(CGRect)theFrame puzzle:(Puzzle *)thePuzzle title:(NSString *)theTitle {
    self = [super initWithFrame:theFrame];
    if (self) {
        [self setPuzzle:thePuzzle];
        [self setTitle:theTitle];
        [self initHelper];
    }
    return self;
}
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So even if I instance CustomUIView with plain init, it will call initWithFrame? –  hpique Dec 5 '10 at 16:39
13  
What's important to remember is that if an object gets instantiated from a NIB, initWithCoder: is called, and NOT initWithFrame:. –  Pascal May 29 '11 at 16:58
1  
@Pascal that's a good point and probably should be edited into the answer, from the doc referenced in the answer about initWithFrame: "If you use Interface Builder to design your interface, this method is not called when your view objects are subsequently loaded from the nib file." –  Paulo Manuel Santos Feb 8 '12 at 15:11
2  
So with @Pascal comments, Sam's accepted answer is false. Since you can't rely on a convention for constructors, it's probably less time consuming to assume you must override all of them, to ensure your init is run each time. –  Gregory Johnson Apr 29 at 8:43
1  
@GregoryJohnson Not necessarily all of them; initWithCoder: is special, it's part of the NSCoding category. You're fine with overriding the designated initializer, initWithFrame: in this case, PLUS initWithCoder:. –  Pascal Apr 29 at 15:41
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In general you should follow the designated initializer convention. The designated initializer is the init, that covers the initialization of all instance variables. The designated initializer is also the method that is called by other init methods of a class.

Apple's documentation about designated initializers.

initWithFrame: is the designated initializer of the NSView class. Apple's Cocoa documentation always explicitly mentions the designated initializer of a class.

initWithCoder: is discussed here on SO.

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