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The following query will display all Dewey Decimal numbers that have been duplicated in the "book" table:

SELECT dewey_number, 
 COUNT(dewey_number) AS NumOccurrences
FROM book
GROUP BY dewey_number
HAVING ( COUNT(dewey_number) > 1 )

However, what I'd like to do is have my query display the name of the authors associated with the duplicated entry (the "book" table and "author" table are connected by "author_id"). In other words, the query above would yield the following:

dewey_number | NumOccurrences
------------------------------
5000         | 2
9090         | 3

What I'd like the results to display is something similar to the following:

author_last_name | dewey_number | NumOccurrences
-------------------------------------------------
Smith            | 5000         | 2
Jones            | 5000         | 2
Jackson          | 9090         | 3
Johnson          | 9090         | 3
Jeffers          | 9090         | 3

Any help you can provide is greatly appreciated. And, in case it comes into play, I'm using a Postgresql DB.

UPDATE: Please note that "author_last_name" is not in the "book" table.

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Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/18932/… Can someone close please? –  Binary Worrier Jan 12 '09 at 16:28
5  
Read it more closely. This is not a duplicate. –  Huuuze Jan 12 '09 at 16:41
    
Not a duplicate at all. He wants to find the duplicate rows (and more that that), not to remove them. –  Federico A. Ramponi Jan 12 '09 at 16:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 18 down vote accepted

A nested query can do the job.

SELECT author_last_name, dewey_number, NumOccurrences
FROM author INNER JOIN
     ( SELECT author_id, dewey_number,  COUNT(dewey_number) AS NumOccurrences
        FROM book
        GROUP BY author_id, dewey_number
        HAVING ( COUNT(dewey_number) > 1 ) ) AS duplicates
ON author.id = duplicates.author_id

(I don't know if this is the fastest way to achieve what you want.)

Update: Here is my data

SELECT * FROM author;
 id | author_last_name 
----+------------------
  1 | Fowler
  2 | Knuth
  3 | Lang

SELECT * FROM book;
 id | author_id | dewey_number |         title          
----+-----------+--------------+------------------------
  1 |         1 |          600 | Refactoring
  2 |         1 |          600 | Refactoring
  3 |         1 |          600 | Analysis Patterns
  4 |         2 |          600 | TAOCP vol. 1
  5 |         2 |          600 | TAOCP vol. 1
  6 |         2 |          600 | TAOCP vol. 2
  7 |         3 |          500 | Algebra
  8 |         3 |          500 | Undergraduate Analysis
  9 |         1 |          600 | Refactoring
 10 |         2 |          500 | Concrete Mathematics
 11 |         2 |          500 | Concrete Mathematics
 12 |         2 |          500 | Concrete Mathematics

And here is the result of the above query:

 author_last_name | dewey_number | numoccurrences 
------------------+--------------+----------------
 Fowler           |          600 |              4
 Knuth            |          600 |              3
 Knuth            |          500 |              3
 Lang             |          500 |              2
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Ok, probably a nested query is overkill, but now I'm sure it works. Tony Andrews' comment on the author_id column applies here too. –  Federico A. Ramponi Jan 12 '09 at 17:07
    
By the way, why are you searching for duplicates based on author's name and Dewey code? Duplicates (multiple copies of the same book, I guess) should be based also on the book's title... –  Federico A. Ramponi Jan 12 '09 at 17:20
    
I updated the code, but it returns 0 results. As for the use case question, I simply created a dummy scenario -- I'm not actually working on detecting duplicate books. –  Huuuze Jan 12 '09 at 17:25
    
"I updated the code, but it returns 0 results." I executed this code in psql with two tables like yours and it returned the expected data. Check your data. Let me work out the details, then I'll update my post. –  Federico A. Ramponi Jan 12 '09 at 17:28
    
OK, I found part of the problem on my end -- a couple fields were missing DD numbers. Unfortunately, the query doesn't yield the desired result -- it only displays the name of a single author with books that have duplicated DD numbers. –  Huuuze Jan 12 '09 at 17:36

You probably want this

SELECT dewey_number, author_last_name,
 COUNT(dewey_number) AS NumOccurrences
FROM book
GROUP BY dewey_number,author_last_name
HAVING ( COUNT(dewey_number) > 1 )
share|improve this answer
1  
"author_last_name" is not in the "book" table. The "book" table and "author" table are connected by a FKed "author_id" in the "book" table. –  Huuuze Jan 12 '09 at 16:27
SELECT dewey_number, author_last_name,
       COUNT(dewey_number) AS NumOccurrences
FROM book
JOIN author USING (author_id)
GROUP BY dewey_number,author_last_name
HAVING COUNT(dewey_number) > 1

If book.author_id can be null then change the join to:

LEFT OUTER JOIN author USING (author_id)

If the author_id column has a different name in each table then you can't use USING, use ON instead:

JOIN author ON author.id = book.author_id

or

LEFT OUTER JOIN author ON author.id = book.author_id
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No luck on this one. It returns 0 results. –  Huuuze Jan 12 '09 at 16:37
    
Do both tables have a column AUTHOR_ID as you stated? My USING syntax assumes that. If not change to "JOIN author ON author.xxx = book.yyy". If the query returns 0 rows (without error) that suggests that there the authors table is empty? –  Tony Andrews Jan 12 '09 at 16:45
    
I think we're getting closer. I did neglect to mention that it's "author.id" and "book.author_id", so good call on USING vs ON. I updated accordingly, but Postgresql didn't like the bracketed "[LEFT JOIN]". After removing the brackets, it yields 0 results. –  Huuuze Jan 12 '09 at 17:00
    
And, no, neither "id" field can be null. –  Huuuze Jan 12 '09 at 17:03
1  
Sorry, the brackets around LEFT OUTER were my way of saying that these keywords were optional –  Tony Andrews Jan 12 '09 at 17:52

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