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I have base class Class1 and a derived class2. I create two instances of class2 but defined as class1. My problem is I can't do a generic compare between this objects. Here are an example:

    public class Class1
    {
        public int Property1 = 0;
    }

    public class Class2 :  Class1
    {
        public int Property2 = 0;

        public static bool operator ==(Class2 c1, Class2 c2)
        {
            return c1.Property2 == c2.Property2;
        }

        public static bool operator !=(Class2 c1, Class2 c2)
        {
            return c1.Property2 != c2.Property2;
        }
    }

    public class Class3 :  Class1
    {
        public int Property3 = 0;
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Class1 obj1 = new Class2();
        Class1 obj2 = new Class2();

        if (obj1 == obj2)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Yes !!! The two objects are equal!");
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("The two objects are not equal.");
        }
    }

if I change the line:

if (obj1 == obj2)

for:

if ((Class2)obj1 == (Class2)obj2)

all is right, but if obj1 and obj2 are Class3 I get error

How can I resolve it ?

Thank you

Crandel

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Are you attempting to do a value based comparer since c# prvoide standard reference == automatically. –  rerun Dec 5 '10 at 17:02
1  
Do you mean overloaded or overridden? Overrated means something else. What error are you getting? –  Oded Dec 5 '10 at 17:02
    
far as I understand static methods are overloaded and not overridden. Maybe I expect an overridden result :S. I don't try it really, but I suppose a cast error –  Crandel Dec 5 '10 at 17:29
    
You are trying to achieve polymorphism (i.e. choosing the right "==" implementation based on the run-time-type of obj1 and obj2), but as operators are static in C#, they cannot be virtual. –  Frank Dec 5 '10 at 18:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Add your operator overloads to all the classes, in your example add it to Class1 as well to get it to work

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I want to define the operator in all derived class to can compare his own properties. Class2 can compare Property1 and Property2. Class3 can compare Property1 and Property3. But you're right I need to do it at base class –  Crandel Dec 5 '10 at 17:09

In my opinion it is a bad idea to overload the == and != operators at all, since there default semantic with reference types is to compare references rather than values. I'd rather override bool Equals(System.Object) and int GetHashCode() and use Equals for value comparison - IMHO makes the code more readable by virtue of reducing ambiguity.

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I know, but I don't want to compare reference type. Some times I have two instances of the same object and I need to detect when there are the same or not. –  Crandel Dec 5 '10 at 17:20
1  
MSDN recommends: "When a type is immutable, meaning the data contained in the instance cannot be changed, overloading operator == to compare value equality instead of reference equality can be useful because, as immutable objects, they can be considered the same as long as they have the same value. Overriding operator == in non-immutable types is not recommended." –  Cody Gray Dec 5 '10 at 17:21
    
I agree, maybe my problem is when I create the second object instead to detect if the object already exist. –  Crandel Dec 5 '10 at 17:36
    
@Crandel: In your example you do compare reference types - defining a type with the "class" keyword makes it a reference type by definition, as opposed to the "struct" keyword which defines a value type. @Cody Gray: Agreed, makes sense when the types are immutable. Doesn't apply to Crandel's example, though. –  chris Dec 5 '10 at 22:56

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