Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to use extern variables.

It complains that because of using numberWithInt I am not passing a contants as the value of my variable

So I removed the const and it's complaining that an extern variable must be a constant, so what is the solutions here?

I DO NOT WANT TO USE INT

.h
extern NSNumber const *MoveID;

.m
NSNumber const *MoveID = [NSNumber numberWithInt:1];
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can try to do the following:

.h

extern NSNumber *MoveID;

.m

NSNumber *MoveID;
@implementation MYGreatClass
+ (void) initialize {
    static bool done = FALSE;
    if(!done){ // This method will be called again if you subclass the class and don't define a initialize method for the subclass
        MoveID = [[NSNumber numberWithInt:1] retain];
        done = TRUE;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
5  
Note that the value of MoveID isn't gonna be set until something somewhere touches the MYGreatClass class. You could use a +load method if that is a problem. –  bbum Dec 5 '10 at 18:54

EDIT: I just realized that I totally missed the question and was going on about why the error was occurring, oops. I'll leave the first part of my answer here though because Jacob Relkin quotes it in his answer.


Because [NSNumber numberWithInt:1] is not a compile-time constant value, you cannot set an NSNumber created with it to a const variable.

There appears to be a radar about extern NSNumber consts, which seem to be unsupported in Objective-C. I guess you can use a preprocessor macro to create NSNumbers from constant ints or floats as described in this article. It's not nearly the same as what you intend but it seems to be pretty close.

share|improve this answer

As @BoltClock said, you cannot set a non-constant value to be of const type.

What you could do is this:

extern NSNumber *MoveID;

And...

NSNumber *MoveID;
@implementation SomeClass 
static BOOL loaded = NO;
+ (void) initialize {
   if(!loaded) {
      MoveID = [[NSNumber alloc] initWithInt:1];
      loaded = YES;
   }
}
//blah blah blah

@end
share|improve this answer

Just for completeness, the modern method is do do it as:

in .h

extern NSNumber *MoveID;

in .m

NSNumber *MoveID;

...

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];

    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        MoveID = @1;
    });

    ...
}

dispatch_once() will only ever run once so the initialiser is not duplicated, and it is thread safe. Also, pushing down initialisation code lower down in the view lifecycle.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.