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I need to find the cube root of a huge(5k bits or so) number rounded upwards. How do I do that?

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Have you tried e.g. gnu.org/software/bc? Or if you need to do this w/in a particular language, what language is it? Are there specific time/space constraints? –  Josh Bleecher Snyder Dec 5 '10 at 19:18
    
i tried bc but it doesnt like non-integer(1/3) exponents –  Dani Dec 5 '10 at 19:23

2 Answers 2

If GNU bc is fine for you, this might do:

http://phodd.net/gnu-bc/bcfaq.html#bccbrt

EDIT:

It essentially boils down to:

$ bc -l
define cbrt(x) { return e(l(x)/3) }

You will need to increase the scale variable in order to have the necessary precision:

$ bc -l
bc 1.06.95
Copyright 1991-1994, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2004, 2006 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY.
For details type `warranty'.

define cbrt(x) { return e(l(x)/3) }

cbrt(10000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000)^3
9999999999999999999845725361475980907263179272258247094885777761435.\
89049462743995306310

scale=1000

cbrt(10000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000)^3
9999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999.\
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999\
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999\
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999\
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999\
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999\
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999\
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999\
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999\
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999\
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999\
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999\
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999\
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999\
99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999978254573198390239858\
069738839057154871628814670160708326688382280410

As you probably noticed, without increasing the scale variable (on my system it defaults to 20) the result has nowhere near your required precision.

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1  
This should work with any bc, not just gnu. –  R.. May 3 '11 at 13:58

Here is a straightforward iterative algorithm. Note that they make a point of calling out the special case of square roots:

A special case is the familiar square-root algorithm. By setting n = 2, the iteration rule in step 2 becomes the square root iteration rule

The same technique can be applied to cube roots: set n = 3 and iterate until you achieve the desired precision.

In the case of the specification in the comment "it needs to be rounded up to closest integer and be exact", that will only be possible for numbers that have integer or rational cube roots. That said, you can use the cited algorithm to find an answer to this level of precision by iterating until the difference between the result of one iteration and the next is less than 0.5. That is close enough to assure that future iterations won't wander far from that approximation.

Is this an exercise for a numerical analysis class? If so, I suspect this is exactly why the question was posed this way: the instructor would like you to apply the general rule to the specific problem.

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I need no precision... as I said, I need the cube root rounded up –  Dani Dec 5 '10 at 19:24
    
@Dani, "rounded up" means rounding to some level of precision. –  Bob Cross Dec 5 '10 at 19:25
1  
no precision, it needs to be rounded up to closest integer and be exact –  Dani Dec 5 '10 at 19:28

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