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How do I create a new object in javascript based on a variable type-string (containing the name of the object)?

Now I have: (with more tools coming the list will get longer...)

function getTool(name){
  switch(name){
    case "SelectTool":
      return new SelectTool();
      break;
    case "LineTool":
      return new LineTool();
      break;
    case "BlurTool":
      return new BlurTool();
      break;
    case "PointerTool":
    default:
      return new PointerTool();
      break;
  }
}

And defined my tools like:

PointerTool.prototype = new Tool;
PointerTool.prototype.constructor = PointerTool;
function PointerTool(){
  this.name = "PointerTool";
}
PointerTool.prototype.click = function(x, y){
  info("You clicked at: "+x+", "+y);
}

I would like to get ride of the (growing) switch statement, it seems 'wrong'.

share|improve this question
    
Hypothetically, eval could do it ... –  Šime Vidas Dec 5 '10 at 19:30
2  
@Šime Vidas, but practically, eval should be avoided at all costs :D –  Gabi Purcaru Dec 5 '10 at 19:32
    
@Gabi, I agree that eval() is not the correct solution here, but I'm curious why you assert that "eval should be avoided at all costs". It is a non-deprecated feature of the language, with appropriate (and inappropriate) uses -- just like every other feature. –  Lee Dec 5 '10 at 19:46
    
@Šime: I'll ask Jeff to add downvotes on comments! :-P –  Marcel Korpel Dec 5 '10 at 19:47
1  
Sometimes eval is the only answer, and that is when it should be used. If these objects were defined within an anonymous self executing function, they could not be referenced using window[constructor]. –  MooGoo Dec 5 '10 at 20:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted
function getTool(name){
  return ( typeof window[name] === 'function' ) ? 
                                    new window[name]() : {/*some default*/};
}

Assumes PointerTool constructor is defined in the global window namespace. Replace that with whatever namespace you're using.

share|improve this answer
1  
If you're using Node.js you can use the GLOBAL object to do this same thing. –  Robin Duckett Dec 5 '10 at 19:35
    
I'll go with this solution for now, totaly forgot that everything is a function, thus also the global window object/functions/namespace :) –  Dribbel Dec 5 '10 at 21:09
    
@Dribbel - Sounds good. I only used window because I wasn't certain of the namespace. I'd recommend defining them in some other namespace if you are using window. The same technique can be used, but if getTool isn't doing anything else, you could eliminate that function call. –  user113716 Dec 5 '10 at 21:53

You should consider rethinking your approach. It would be better to have something like a Tools object, which would have the tools as properties, like

Tools = {"SelectTool": SelectTool /* etc */}`.

This way, you could access the tools both as new Tools.SelectTool and new Tools[var_with_tool_name].

share|improve this answer
    
This looks more complicated to me than Patrick's approach. –  Marcel Korpel Dec 5 '10 at 19:33
2  
Yes, but it works even if the tools are in different namespaces. –  Gabi Purcaru Dec 5 '10 at 19:34

In your example, you're declaring PointerTool as a function in the global scope. Assuming your javascript is running the browser, the "global scope" is actually the same as the window object. That means that if you have a constructor:

function PointerTool() {
   ...
}

that's the same as this:

window.PointerTool = function() {
   ...
}

So now, in your getTool function, you can access your constructor functions like this:

function getTool(name){
    return new window[name]();
}

A more "future proof" way to do this would be to do define your own namespace object, in which you'll place all your various tool constructors. Something like this ("myproject" would be the short name of your project or system):

var myproject = { tools: {} };

// Pointer Tool Constructor
myproject.tools.PointerTool = function() {
   ...
}

// Line Tool Constructor
myproject.tools.LineTool = function() {
   ...
}

// and so on

Then your getTool function would look like this:

function getTool(name){
    return new myproject.tools[name]();
}

This approach keeps your stuff isolated from whatever other stuff happens to be defined in the global/window scope.

share|improve this answer
    
No, function PointerToolwindow.PointerTool = function: the first is a function declaration, the second a function expression. kangax.github.com/nfe/#expr-vs-decl –  Marcel Korpel Dec 5 '10 at 19:43
    
True, but in the context of this question, it is equal enough. That is, you can reference PointerTool by using window.PointerTool, which is the point of this answer. –  MooGoo Dec 5 '10 at 20:02

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