Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to rewrite the << operator so that it can cout values for hour (int) and temperature (double).

I think I've included all necessary sections. Thanks in advance.

struct Reading {
    int hour;
    double temperature;
    Reading(int h, double t): hour(h), temperature(t) { }
    bool operator<(const Reading &r) const;
};

========

ostream& operator<<(ostream& ost, const Reading &r)
{
    // unsure what to enter here

    return ost;
}

========

vector<Reading> get_temps()
{
// stub version                                                                 
    cout << "Please enter name of input file name: ";
    string name;
    cin >> name;
    ifstream ist(name.c_str());
    if(!ist) error("can't open input file ", name);

    vector<Reading> temps;
    int hour;
    double temperature;
    while (ist >> hour >> temperature){
        if (hour <0 || 23 <hour) error("hour out of range");
        temps.push_back( Reading(hour,temperature));
    }

}

share|improve this question
5  
Is this homework? –  Andres Jaan Tack Dec 5 '10 at 23:57
2  
What's your question? Are you asking us to write your function for you? –  Gabe Dec 6 '10 at 0:01
    
Duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/4362077/… There's no need to ask two of the same/similar question. –  muntoo Dec 6 '10 at 1:03
    
You're just duplicating your previous question: stackoverflow.com/questions/4362077/… –  chrisaycock Dec 6 '10 at 1:05
    
Does the hour matter or does larger just mean temperature? –  Loki Astari Dec 6 '10 at 5:10
show 1 more comment

7 Answers

For example like this:

bool operator <(Reading const& left, Reading const& right)
{
    return left.temperature < right.temperature;
}

And it should be a global function (or in the same namespace as Reading), not a member or Reading, it should be declared as a friend if you going to have any protected or private members. This could be done like so:

struct Reading {
    int hour;
    double temperature;
    Reading(int h, double t): hour(h), temperature(t) { }

    friend bool operator <(Reading const& left, Reading const& right);
};
share|improve this answer
    
Make sure the operator definition goes in the same namespace the struct is in, so that it can be found during argument-dependent lookup. –  Ben Voigt Dec 6 '10 at 3:52
    
Didn't think you can have a private member of a struct - wouldn't it have to be a class? In that case, yes, use friend so that the private/protected members may be accessed. –  Will Dec 6 '10 at 3:58
    
Just out of curiosity, can you expand on why you say it should not be a member function? –  Will Dec 6 '10 at 3:58
    
@Will: there is absolutely no difference between struct and class in C++, other than structs defaulting to public, and classes to private. But you can have private members in a struct just as easily as you can have public members of a class. –  jalf Dec 6 '10 at 3:59
    
@jalf: thanks. I wasn't sure; I cannot remember ever using a struct for a type that has private data. To me, that was always the function of a class, though, as you say, the two are the same, save the default visibility level of their members. –  Will Dec 6 '10 at 4:01
show 3 more comments

You probably want something like

ost << r.hour << ' ' << r.temperature;

This is pretty simple stuff though, and if it doesn't make sense you should really talk to someone or get a book.

And if it still doesn't make sense or you can't be bothered, consider choosing another hobby/career.

share|improve this answer
add comment

IIRC, you can do it one of two ways ...

// overload operator<
bool operator< ( const Reading & lhs, const Reading & rhs )
{
  return lhs.temperature < rhs.temperature;
}

or, you can add the operator to your struct ...

struct Reading {
  int hour;
  double temperature;
  Reading ( int h, double t ) : hour ( h ), temperature ( t ) { }
  bool operator< ( const Reading & other ) { return temperature < other.temperature; }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Use ost parameter like std::cout in operator<<.

share|improve this answer
add comment
r.hour()
r.temperature()

You've declared hour and temperature as member fields of Reading, not member methods. Thus they are simply r.hour and r.temperature (no ()).

share|improve this answer
add comment

As hour and temperature are variables rather than functions, just remove the trailing () from the operator<< functions.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can overload an operator like this in c++.

struct Reading {
     int hour;
     double temperature;
     Reading(int h, double t): hour(h), temperature(t) { }
     bool operator<(struct Reading &other) {
         //do your comparisons between this and other and return a value
     }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.