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It's well known that developers have to read and understand code more than write it. So one of my standard interview questions is to give the candidate 10 lines of code and ask the following:

  • Explain what the code is doing.
  • Explain any significant issues with the code.
  • Explain how to prioritise the fixes.
  • Explain how to fix the issues.

Each specific issue then becomes a more general discussion point to establish the candidate's thinking. This approach has been quite successful in establishing how well candidates find issues and find/prioritise fixes.

The C# code sample that I use for this is a bit long in the tooth now, but I will post it as my answer to this question. Can you provide your own C#/VB code sample (up to 30 lines of code) and talk about its significant issues?

Update: Added a bonus to see if there are some more good answers out there. And added my own answer.

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closed as not constructive by casperOne Dec 1 '11 at 18:53

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Bug fix prioritization come from the needs of the owner. Asking about estimating the relative effort of fixes is legitimate though. Handing someone code needing fixing and asking them what's most important is like asking your neighbor what color car you should buy. –  wallyk Dec 6 '10 at 2:20
    
@wallyk: I dunno, I would hope people be able to prioritize "bug that causes a crash 1 time in 3" and "bug that changes your terminal colour 1 time in 10". –  Anon. Dec 6 '10 at 2:23
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@wally: the type of issues I pose definitely need context, and I hope the candidate asks me for that context. But I don't allow the candidate to hand-off all prioritisation to a business owner. –  RoadWarrior Dec 6 '10 at 2:24
1  
Nice way to support an interview. The 10 lines of code may a be a tat limiting, however. Maybe that is why this "long in he tooth" example of yours needs refreshing. Current technologies and design paradigmns imply less linear, less self-contained code snippets. Most meaningful example will likely be maybe an order of 10 times longer or so. Obvioulsy you can't drown the argument in 10,000 lines of legacy code, but extending your limit may yield better anwers. –  mjv Dec 6 '10 at 2:27
1  
I must be stupid++ or blind^2 here, where is your original sample? –  FastAl Dec 20 '10 at 20:46
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5 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Here's some code for review that I've used in an interview; I tell the candidate to review it and list everything they would flag in a code review:

public int numeric(System.String Input)
{
    bool canBeConverted = false;
    try {
        int n = Convert.ToInt16(Input);
        if (n != 0) canBeConverted = true;
    } catch (System.Exception ex) { }

    int Retval = 0;
    if (canBeConverted == true)
    {
        // is a number
        Retval = 1;
    }
    else Retval = 0;

    return Retval;
}

Here's some issues I'd like the candidate to address:

  1. Method has no comments describing what it does; given the amount of time candidates spend trying to puzzle it out, this should be obvious.
  2. Convert.ToInt16 in a try/catch block is strange; catch (FormatException) would be better; int.TryParse would be best.
  3. catch (Exception) { } is wrong.
  4. if (n != 0) seems like a bug; why would "0" not be considered numeric? (This is a deliberate bug.)
  5. A better method name would be IsNumeric.
  6. Whatever brace style you prefer, at least be consistent within one method.
  7. Don't use an int for what is a bool return value.
  8. Don't use if (x == true).
  9. Stylistic: avoid unnecessary System prefix; use string not System.String; variable names should begin with lowercase; method names should begin with uppercase; avoid abbreviations in variable names; avoid unnecessary initialisation; if and else braces should be balanced.

It's not highly scientific, but I'm interested in how candidates approach it. In my opinion, the best quickly flag all the obvious inconsistent formatting choices, then review the logic & find the bugs, eventually work out what the method is doing and suggest deleting this method and using TryParse instead. Coming up with only one or two items on the list above is usually a bad sign.

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1  
The "miising comments" part is not as obvious as you think. I´ve had test with no comments at all, so I had to igure out what the code does by myself :/ –  Oliver A. Dec 18 '10 at 2:46
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If I am asked by an interviewer "Explain what the code is doing" I would not expect green code to spell it out for me. –  P.Brian.Mackey Dec 20 '10 at 16:59
    
We should probably differentiate on "levels" of the candidates. This example looks very obvious for strong candidate. –  Restuta Dec 24 '10 at 0:52
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I wouldn't necessarily expect a candidate to point to naming conventions. They may assume they are some crazy naming conventions your company uses and so ignore them. –  Garry Shutler Dec 24 '10 at 12:48
1  
The very first thing that I thought looking at that code was: "What's wrong with TryParse?" I wonder if it be a problem that I never gave you a chance to see how good I am at detecting the rest of the code's flaws. –  Cody Gray Dec 24 '10 at 14:48
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The best thing would be to use the code samples from your own project.

That will help you find out whether and how this candidate will deal with day to day problems in real life on your project. This will also help the candidate know what kind of problems and code he will have to deal with on the job.

For more insights into what and ideal interview process should be like, please read this The Guerrilla Guide to Interviewing (version 3.0) by Joel Spolsky

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1- How many instances of class B are there

 public class B
{
    B obj = null;
    public B()
    {
        obj = new B();
    }
}

2- what is wrong with the following code?

 public class B
{
    public virtual void DoWork()
    {
    }

    public B()
    {
        DoWork();
    }

}

public class C:B
{
    public override void DoWork()
    {
    }


}

public class D : C
{
    public override void DoWork()
    {
    }


}

Somewhere in the main method ?

  D d= new D();

3- For creation of a object , reference type must have a public constructor or default constructor and this is also a known fact that string is a reference type.

so if iam having a Employee class and i want to access its instance level methods so ineed to create a object of Employee as following

 Employee e = new Employee();

But for string class ,i don't have to write following code

  String str = new String(); 

instead i can directly use string variable , can you apply this technique to the Employee class so that whenever iwrote the statement

 Employee e;

it will return a valid initilized object? Is it possible in C#?

4- Why method overloading is not possible with ref and out parameter?

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1  
Try to give the classes descriptive names. It's unneccesarly difficult to try to understand code with nonsense names, and being able to do that is not one of the skills that you are looking for. –  Guffa Dec 24 '10 at 13:37
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Bradley,

I find your test not good enough for an experienced developer interview. If you are after juniors, it may help. You can ask different types of questions depending on the projects you deal with;

For example if you are into web projects, giving a connection leaked code would be better. I'd stick with a code that includes a DataReader that isn't closed (connection is closed when reader is closed). You may even close the reader but not the connection and ask for what is wrong with the code, I'm sure %99 will answer that the connection isn't yet closed :)

Ask the candidate what he'd do if he saw the error:

Error - Timeout expired. The timeout period elapsed prior to obtaining a connection from the pool. This may have occurred because all pooled connections were in use and max pool size was reached.

Correct result should be, I'll look for a connection leak, if I can't find one, check the connection settings for the sql server, monitor the sql server...

And so on.

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2  
Yuk. What if he wrote great code, never got connection leaks and never saw the error? Should not be an arbitrary secret thing. Nasty thing is, most hires are Juniors. Most programmers that look awsome on paper would flounder that test. I am guessing 1 in 4 would nail it. And those would be as good as you can hope without paying huge salaries. In which case you can afford more lenthy testing. –  FastAl Dec 20 '10 at 20:44
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Just because a guy can answer "trivia" doesn't mean he can write and debug code like a champion. When I interview people I pay close attention to the individual. Look at their resume, ask open ended questions that encourage bi-directional communication. This is the only way to truly delve into a person's skills. Look for what they do know, not what they do not. If you give a programming test, allow them to take it home. Finally, give them the freedom to write code. Great programmers write code in different ways, which may be different and possibly better than boxing them up with the academic. –  P.Brian.Mackey Dec 20 '10 at 22:40
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Finally, just because you put this particular error at the front of your mind, doesn't mean everybody has. There's plenty of error's that I have fixed that I would not recall in an interview where there's no google, no visual studio, or other familiar productivity tools I depend on to speed and trigger my memory. –  P.Brian.Mackey Dec 20 '10 at 22:43
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This C# 2.0 code, the context of which is deliberately left ambiguous in the hope that the candidate will ask questions, is designed to see if the candidate can jump over a fairly low hurdle. Hopefully the resulting discussion leads to some insights into what's important to the candidate. The domain is line-of-business apps in an investment bank.

public class DodgyCode
{
    public event EventHandler LoginCorrect;

    public DodgyCode()
    {
    }

    public bool IsLoginCorrect(string userFolder, string userId, string userPassword)
    {
        if (File.Exists(Path.Combine(userFolder, userId)))
        {
            try
            {
                StreamReader fileReader = File.OpenText(Path.Combine(userFolder, userId));
                string filePassword = fileReader.ReadLine();
                fileReader.Close();
                if (filePassword == userPassword)
                {
                    this.LoginCorrect(this, EventArgs.Empty);
                    return true;
                }
                else
                {
                    return false;
                }
            }
            catch (System.Exception exc)
            {
                this.LogException(exc);
                throw;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    private void LogException(System.Exception exc)
    {
        // Blah blah
    }
}
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3  
Just my opinion, but this code is so far from my own style that most of these questions wouldnt even cross my mind within a few minutes time. If I took it home and scrutinized it, I could def. see some of these issues, but I don't commonly use delegates/Events in my normal programming patterns, that's definitly a style thing. Thread safety is not a typical concern of mine either as most apps I build are not multi-threaded. I've looked several times and have difficulty figuring out how the filepassword object is correctly populated, I just find this code difficult to read without a debugger. –  P.Brian.Mackey Dec 21 '10 at 14:54
    
@Brian: that's fair enough, because my domain is line-of-business software in an investment bank, where multi-threading, events, delegates, security, etc are all important aspects. Your domain is clearly different. Can you give a code sample that you might use? –  RoadWarrior Dec 21 '10 at 15:06
2  
I agree that this is way different from anything I'd ever write, but for different reasons that P.Brian. I look at this and the first thing that jumps out at me is "A bank app is building a path to a file based on entered information (the username no less) in order to locate a file with a password in it for a comparison? Dear god this is so jacked up I don't want to work here." –  Chris Lively Dec 21 '10 at 21:20
    
@Chris: it's UserId, not the user name. Also, this code sample is completely artificial and designed to provoke discussion, not to resemble real life. –  RoadWarrior Dec 21 '10 at 23:45
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Glad to hear it's artificial and that definitely promotes discussion. I've worked with a few banks and have seen enough bad security practices that I wouldn't doubt for a minute at least one of them is doing something like this. –  Chris Lively Dec 22 '10 at 16:45
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