Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
<div>
   <p>
      <a></a>
   </p>
</div>

In the code above, for jQuery, we can use $('div p a') to get the <a> element, but in javascript, how can we do get <a> element like $('div p a')?

Updated 2
If I have many <a> element and I don't know the index of the specific <a> element, I just know this specific <a> element is under <div id="some">, how can I get the <a> element by javascript?

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you want to use jQuery? Just learning? –  Sasha Chedygov Dec 6 '10 at 3:10
    
jQuery not works on some page and I can't find the reason, so I am trying to get the <a> element by javascript –  Charles Yeung Dec 6 '10 at 3:35
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you can get the div then get the a tag within it JSFiddle example

HTML

<div>
   <p>
       <a></a>
   </p>
</div>
<div id="some">
    <a href="#">my a tag</a>
</div>

JavaScript

var elems = document.getElementById('some').getElementsByTagName('a');
alert(elems[0].innerHTML);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I get the idea. –  Charles Yeung Dec 6 '10 at 4:53
add comment

If you have some more info, like the IDs of the elements, you can use document.getElementById('id'). Otherwise, you can traverse the DOM tree, see this:

You can also use xpath:

For xpath, take a look at this tutorial (examples part of the tutorial, actually):

In your example, the xpath should be: //div/p/a, which will select all such element trees, if there are more then one.

share|improve this answer
    
But does XPath work natively without additional libraries? –  Robin Orheden Dec 6 '10 at 2:59
    
It works natively, though you need to consider different browsers - the w3schools example is cross-browser compatible, you can check for more details there. Btw, why don't you use jQuery? That's why it was made for anyway... –  icyrock.com Dec 6 '10 at 3:01
    
please see updated 2 –  Charles Yeung Dec 6 '10 at 3:36
    
As per the first link I posted, you can use parentNode to get the parent of the found a element. You can check if it has nodeType of div and, if so, use getAttribute('id') to check whether it's equal to some (see this: java2s.com/Code/JavaScriptReference/Javascript-Methods/…). If not, recursively go up. I would, however, strongly recommend looking into why jQuery doesn't work instead - I think this is just avoiding the issue, not solving it. –  icyrock.com Dec 6 '10 at 3:39
add comment

See method ’document.getElementsByTagName’

http://www.w3schools.com/Dom/met_document_getelementsbytagname.asp

Using this method. You would first iterate all divs, and on those divs get all paragraphs, and then the same thing for the anchors.

share|improve this answer
    
plaese see updated 2 –  Charles Yeung Dec 6 '10 at 3:35
add comment

jQuery is Javascript; I think you meant standard Javascript DOM functions. Also, it is better to use jQuery for this: find out what is wrong, instead of trying to reinvent the wheel. One thing will lead to another. It will be better in the long run to have a concrete library like jQuery backing you. If you really need to use CSS3 selectors like this, use the Sizzle library. Sizzle was created by the jQuery group for this purpose. (I am not associated with jQuery or Sizzle except for being a satisfied user).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.