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I understand at a low level what static (compile time) and dynamic (runtime) bindings are.

I understand to some extent why it's important to know that (e.g., the fact that generics are resolved statically helps explain what you can and cannot do, etc).

What I don't understand is why the choices were made one way or another - e.g., Java uses static binding for overloaded methods, and dynamic binding for overridden ones. Why is that? Is it a design choice, is it something that is obvious and unavoidable for people that understand the deep functioning of Java, or is it something one needs to learn (rather than understand)?

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The question is, how can the compiler know which method to call during compile time, in the case of overriding. You must understand this,

List list = list.getAList();
list.add(whatever);

Now, suppose getAList() method can return any of the several List implementations based on some criteria. Thereby, how can a compiler know, that what implementation is returned? and which add() method to call. As you can see, this can only be decided on runtime. Whereas, in overloading its not the case and everything is clear on compile time. I hope you understand the thing now.

[Edited]

Bringing the discussion going on in the comments to the actual answer.

It can't be known until runtime. Understand it this way, the instantiation of a particular class is dependent on the argument provided by user. Now tell me how the compiler will know which argument user will pass, and apparently what class to instantiate. Or easier still, answer this question that how the compiler will know whether the flow will be passed to if block or else block? Or why do you think we have checked and runtime exceptions? Take the case of divide-by-zero; for example n/m, where m becomes 0 as result of some calculation. In this case, its obvious that the compiler wouldn't be able to say that there would be a ArithmeticException because m is not known right away. As all these information are not available at compile time, thus compiler, similarly, doesn't know which method will override which.

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Fine, but why is it that the JVM can know, but not the compiler? –  JDelage Dec 6 '10 at 15:50
    
@JDelage: Because it can't be known until runtime. Suppose it this way, the instantiation of a particular class is dependent on the argument provided by user. Now tell me how the compiler will know which argument user will pass, and apparently what class to instantiate. Or easier still, answer this question that how the compiler will know whether the flow will be passed to if block or else block? Or why do you think we have checked and runtime exceptions? Similarly, this will not be known at compile time. Thus, we call it late binding. –  Adeel Ansari Dec 6 '10 at 17:00
    
@JDelage: More generally, the halting problem tells us that there is no general way to predict what code is going to do just by analyzing the code (and not running it). All the compiler can do is analyze the code; the JVM is responsible for running it. Thus, the compiler doesn't know which code path it will take through list.getAList(), and can't, in general, know until it's running. Once the code's running, of course, the JVM can step in and perform dynamic binding. –  Antal S-Z Dec 7 '10 at 7:38
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Dynamic binding is for when you override methods because it will need to decide at runtime which method (code) to execute based on the runtime type of the object. With an overloaded method you do not need to decide at runtime, you can figure out at compile time which is the method that will be called. This will result in faster execution.

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What I don't understand is, if I extend an object and override its methods, why can't the compiler know that (the exact type of the object and therefore the definition of its methods)? –  JDelage Dec 16 '10 at 9:42
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According to me i guess it is on obious reason... Overloading is something which complilor understand during complile time and overriding is late binding or runtime.... Understanding OOP concept may help you..

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