Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I have a model as follows:

class Property < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_and_belongs_to_many :property_values
end

What I would like to do is to extend any value returned by a find on the property_values extension with a module that is determined by an attribute of the Property object. I've attempted something like this:

class Property < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_and_belongs_to_many :property_values, :extend => PropertyUtil::Extensible

  def enrich(to_extend)
    modules.split(/\s*,\s*/).each do |mod|
      to_extend.extend(Properties.const_get(mod.to_sym))
    end
  end
end

module PropertyUtil
  module Extensible
    def self.extended(mod)
      mod.module_eval do
        alias old_find find
      end
   end

    def find(*args)
      old_find(*args).map{|prop| proxy_owner.enrich(prop)}
    end
  end
end

Where all modules that may be selected are defined in the Properties module. In attempting to run with this code, though, there are a couple of problems; first, to my surprise, none of the dynamic finders (property_values.find_by_name, etc.) appear to delegate to find; second, something with how I've done the aliasing leads to a stack overflow when I try to run the find directly.

Is there a way to do what I'm attempting? What method can I alias and override such that all results returned by the association extension, irrespective of how they are retrieved, are extended with the appropriate modules?

Thanks, Kris

share|improve this question
    
There's after_find and after_initialize callbacks that you can define, but it's not really recommended because it causes a big performance hit. – jemminger Mar 19 '11 at 3:13

I never tried to do this but you may want to try the following (I just changed how the aliases are done):

class Property < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_and_belongs_to_many :property_values, :extend => PropertyUtil::Extensible

  def enrich(to_extend)
    modules.split(/\s*,\s*/).each do |mod|
      to_extend.extend(Properties.const_get(mod.to_sym))
    end
  end
end

module PropertyUtil
  module Extensible
    def self.extended(mod)
      mod.module_eval do
        alias_method :old_find, :find
        alias_method :find, :new_find
      end
   end

    def new_find(*args)
      old_find(*args).map{|prop| proxy_owner.enrich(prop)}
    end
  end
end

If it does not work here is another idea you may wanna try:

class Value < ActiveRecord::Base
  self.abstract_class = true

end


class ExtendedValue < Value

end

class ExtendedValue2 < Value

end


class Property < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_and_belongs_to_many :property_values, :class_name => 'ExtendedValue'
  has_and_belongs_to_many :property_values_extended, :class_name => 'ExtendedValue'
  has_and_belongs_to_many :property_values_extended2, :class_name => 'ExtendedValue2'


end

The idea is to have one hatbm association per "type" (if you can group your extensions that way) and use the one you want at a given time, if you can do what you want that way I am also pretty sure it will have a smaller impact performance than patching every returned object after activerecord returned them.

I am kinda curious at what you are trying to achieve with this :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your response! The goal is to provide a more flexible sort of single-table inheritance, where a number of different modules can compose to provide behavior and data semantics for property values without having to modify the database to accommodate new types. In my implementation, there is a single text property, value_str, which stores a JSON document; the various modules, when composed, define both the structure of the document and how to process its data. Users can mix and match the available modules in any desired combination. – Kris Nuttycombe Mar 24 '11 at 3:56
    
Did you have a look to composed_of ? It may also be a part of a solution to your problem. – Schmurfy Mar 27 '11 at 11:47
    
composed_of is close, but it's part of the class definition and doesn't look like it gives you the opportunity to resolve the module names after the record has been retrieved from the database. – Kris Nuttycombe Apr 5 '11 at 15:41

It is much easier to simply use classes to change the functionality. You can have classes of PropertyValues with the appropriate behavior and use either STI (Single Table Inheritance) to instantiate the appropriate instance or you can over-ride the 'instantiate' ActiveRecord class method to set the class using the #becomes instance method:

class PropertyValue < AR:Base
  def self.instantiate(record)
    property_value = super
    case property_value.sub # criteria for sub_class
      when 'type1' then property_value.becomes(Type1)
      when 'type2' then property_value.becomes(Type2)
    end
   end
end 

class Type1 < PropertyValue
  def some_method
    # do Type1 behavior
  end
end

class Type2 < PropertyValue
  def some_method
    # do Type2 behavior
  end
end

I have found that using classes and inheritance provides much cleaner, simpler code and is easier to test.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, this doesn't satisfy my use case - I have 15 different modules, of which any number may be composed to specify the behavior and data structure of a property value. It's not sensible to build classes for the cartesian product of these combinations. – Kris Nuttycombe Apr 5 '11 at 15:38
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I ended up using an after_find call on the value class to resolve this problem. This is a pretty suboptimal solution, because it means that the module information ends up needing to be duplicated between the property referent and the value, but it's workable, if less than exactly performant. The performance hit ended up being large enough that I had to cache a bunch of data in the database with the results of computations over large numbers of properties, but this turned out not to be all bad, in that it simplified the process for extraction of report data considerably.

In the end, here are some bits of what I ended up with:

module Properties::NamedModules
  def modules
    (module_names || '').split(/\s*,\s*/).map do |mod_name|
      Property.const_get(mod_name.demodulize.to_sym)
    end
  end
end

module Properties::ModularProperty
  def value_structure
    modules.inject([]){|m, mod| m + mod.value_structure}.uniq
  end
end

module Properties::Polymorphic
  include NamedModules, ModularProperty

  def morph
    modules.each {|mod| self.extend(mod) unless self.kind_of?(mod)}
  end 
end 

class Property < ActiveRecord::Base
  include Properties::NamedModules, Properties::ModularProperty

  has_and_belongs_to_many :property_values, :join_table => 'property_value_selection' 

  def create_value(name, value_data = {})
    property_values.create( 
      :name => name,
      :module_names => module_names,
      :value_str => JSON.generate(value_data) 
    )
  end
end

class PropertyValue < ActiveRecord::Base
  include Properties::Polymorphic
  has_and_belongs_to_many :properties, :join_table => 'property_value_selection'
  after_find :morph
end
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.